Nahtaivel - Pon Farr
Dark Electro, Harsh EBM Released back in December of 2013, Nahtaivel returned after 2011's movie inspired Midnight Sessions. While I am not all too familiar with this act, I have heard that the man behind the music, Fernando Nahtaivel, boasts himself as a serial killer in the project, creating a sort of persona that developed from years of work within black metal bands. And, well, that second personality drifted into this dark electro act, and we have all the more love for this psychotic bastard for doing so.

To me, the sounds present within this album still reek of death, spreading out a filth in the air that will remind you of horror films, slashing and dashing, and your most obsessed over killers found world wide. Hate kicks off the album with a very creepy intro sample from the Living Doll episode of The Twilight Zone that reads, "My name is Talky Tina and I think I could even hate you." What this man is able to do well is that he's able to shift the song into different directions without completely alienating it or your attention. There are even two different sets of vocal chords in this one song from the same person, and they, along with the music, change around the two minute mark. Great work.

Amok Time continues along with a simplistic beat, EBM in nature, and more linear than the previous song. The vocals stay pretty clean. It's around the Two and a half minute mark that an additional synth comes in to add more pleasure to the overall experience.

The third track, Little Pleasures of Life gets darker than the previous track, but still gives off that horror-esque vibe through all the electronic sounds that pulse through. I feel that every step I take through this album, something's lurking around the corner waiting to get me.

The Invention of Lying breaks off into a very sci-fi like sound; cyber punk fans will find something to enjoy in the utopia-like sounds of a forgotten era presented. The robotic vocals serve well within the song, and this song is one to take with love.

Be Productive grabs attention with the noise inspired intro with some tender drum work. This is a song that definitely is inspired by the man's metal background, substituting the earlier vocals with growls and anger focused lyrics, but manages to maintain and industrial sound nonetheless. It's interesting how the ending leaves off on an ambient outro with a final breath to put the song to rest.

A slower paced and long intro showed its face with The Wild Flower - The Fly lasting for a good two minutes before the main beat presented itself. Though I felt the vocals sounded a bit standard in comparison to what the rest of the album showcased so far, the song was enjoyable nonetheless.

A faster paced song with a steady beat and whispering vocals creeped in with Ex Nihilo. The song sort of explodes towards the end at the four and a half minute mark, and again at the five and a half minute mark, offering good variation.

An eight minute song came in next in the form of The Short Story of Asami, The Gravure Idol. Though the only information I was able to dig up on the title was of photobook being sold out of Japan, the song itself was different and weird. Considering it seemed to have a story behind it, I was hoping that the lyrics were just a bit more understandable. But, at least the music was good.

And, finally, at number nine comes Chirstie's Dream. There's a bit of a minimal approach to this song at first, but that gradually changes as more instruments are added in. This is the only instrumental on the album, and after getting through a lot of tracks that sounded evil, this one was able to break the pace by throwing a bit more of a lighter song my way. That is until the song ends with a quote from the same episode of The Twilight Zone mentioned above. This time, the sample reads: "I told you you'd be sorry. Christie. Christie. Wake up Christie..."

However, I am not sorry for getting through this album by far. Constantly throwing different paced, different themed works at me really made me want to explore this album even more than I already did. Not everything is the best sounding song I've ever heard, but it still managed to impress me unlike some albums haven't in the past. I know that there is a recent 2014 release by these guys, and I shall be looking forward to listening to it soon.
4
Brutal Resonance

Nahtaivel - Pon Farr

Released back in December of 2013, Nahtaivel returned after 2011's movie inspired Midnight Sessions. While I am not all too familiar with this act, I have heard that the man behind the music, Fernando Nahtaivel, boasts himself as a serial killer in the project, creating a sort of persona that developed from years of work within black metal bands. And, well, that second personality drifted into this dark electro act, and we have all the more love for this psychotic bastard for doing so.

To me, the sounds present within this album still reek of death, spreading out a filth in the air that will remind you of horror films, slashing and dashing, and your most obsessed over killers found world wide. Hate kicks off the album with a very creepy intro sample from the Living Doll episode of The Twilight Zone that reads, "My name is Talky Tina and I think I could even hate you." What this man is able to do well is that he's able to shift the song into different directions without completely alienating it or your attention. There are even two different sets of vocal chords in this one song from the same person, and they, along with the music, change around the two minute mark. Great work.

Amok Time continues along with a simplistic beat, EBM in nature, and more linear than the previous song. The vocals stay pretty clean. It's around the Two and a half minute mark that an additional synth comes in to add more pleasure to the overall experience.

The third track, Little Pleasures of Life gets darker than the previous track, but still gives off that horror-esque vibe through all the electronic sounds that pulse through. I feel that every step I take through this album, something's lurking around the corner waiting to get me.

The Invention of Lying breaks off into a very sci-fi like sound; cyber punk fans will find something to enjoy in the utopia-like sounds of a forgotten era presented. The robotic vocals serve well within the song, and this song is one to take with love.

Be Productive grabs attention with the noise inspired intro with some tender drum work. This is a song that definitely is inspired by the man's metal background, substituting the earlier vocals with growls and anger focused lyrics, but manages to maintain and industrial sound nonetheless. It's interesting how the ending leaves off on an ambient outro with a final breath to put the song to rest.

A slower paced and long intro showed its face with The Wild Flower - The Fly lasting for a good two minutes before the main beat presented itself. Though I felt the vocals sounded a bit standard in comparison to what the rest of the album showcased so far, the song was enjoyable nonetheless.

A faster paced song with a steady beat and whispering vocals creeped in with Ex Nihilo. The song sort of explodes towards the end at the four and a half minute mark, and again at the five and a half minute mark, offering good variation.

An eight minute song came in next in the form of The Short Story of Asami, The Gravure Idol. Though the only information I was able to dig up on the title was of photobook being sold out of Japan, the song itself was different and weird. Considering it seemed to have a story behind it, I was hoping that the lyrics were just a bit more understandable. But, at least the music was good.

And, finally, at number nine comes Chirstie's Dream. There's a bit of a minimal approach to this song at first, but that gradually changes as more instruments are added in. This is the only instrumental on the album, and after getting through a lot of tracks that sounded evil, this one was able to break the pace by throwing a bit more of a lighter song my way. That is until the song ends with a quote from the same episode of The Twilight Zone mentioned above. This time, the sample reads: "I told you you'd be sorry. Christie. Christie. Wake up Christie..."

However, I am not sorry for getting through this album by far. Constantly throwing different paced, different themed works at me really made me want to explore this album even more than I already did. Not everything is the best sounding song I've ever heard, but it still managed to impress me unlike some albums haven't in the past. I know that there is a recent 2014 release by these guys, and I shall be looking forward to listening to it soon. Jun 24 2014

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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Started in spring 2009, Brutal Resonance quickly grew from a Swedish based netzine into an established International zine of the highest standard.

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