Nahtaivel - Epicus Doomicus Electronicus
Dark Electro, Harsh EBM I just recently reviewed Nahtaivel on the site, and, being the savvy reviewer I am, I was able to get a hold of their most recent album, Epicus Doomicus Electronicus. And, what I can tell you is that I am already enjoying this one much more than their previous effort.

Galactica starts off this album, and rids the screaming vocals from the song. In turn, we're delivered a nice tribal song with wonderful drum work, ritual like chanting and electronics that adhere to the overall theme of the song. Wonderfully done.

Life:Abomination cracks back to some nice and lovely hard beats and the like, but still offers something new that the act has yet to present in the past. Also, the vocals come in as harshly distorted, which fit very well. This album has been described as displaying apocalyptic electronic music, and this track added to that label.

Green Hell offered a more toned down electronic song with vocal work that paired itself to the previous, distorted whisper screams. The song does make a louder play later on, so that was a very welcome addition.

The Void sets the first vocal set that's not as distorted as the rest. More metal inspired than before, the drum work really made a show. During the chorus, the synth work took a step up and dominated.

Endless Galaxies Part I offered a sort of epic song, one that spoke of either a long digested planetary adventure in an effort to save the galaxy, or just a personal struggle being overcome. By far, not bad at all, and very enjoyable.

Allein was the shortest song on the album just clocking in at two minutes and fifteen seconds. Nonetheless, it delivered another track with a few samples here and there and neat little effects scattered about.

Here Comes the Rain featured Luciano Cardoso, a synthpop artist whose project goes by the name of The Chanceller. With piano work aspiring throughout and the screaming vocals gone, this made for an out of place, albeit very well done song. Perhaps the most shocking and smooth going song I've heard from this act.

Endless Galaxies Part II continued from where the first part ended. Slow moving, minimal at first, the song slowly built into some more fantastic and lovely tribal like sounds near the three minute mark. The vocals hit around the four minute mark, and provided the angry angst that I always look forward to from this project.

Finally, The Twilight Zone hit as the final song. Dark ambient effects and a creepy atmosphere that would have belonged in a sci-fi horror flick really claimed the bulk of this song. It was lovely, and threw me back to a lock of older movies with bad special effects, but were so campy that I just couldn't help but enjoy them.

And, my God, this album is over. The second album that I've listened to by this gentleman is great. There is so much on here to enjoy and take pleasure in that there really is no reason why you're not attempting to get this right now. I think this is one of the most diverse albums I've listened to in quite a while. And, though sometimes albums with multiple spanning themes fail to really capture each genre's respected attributes, Nahtaivel is king at managing a plethora amount of music. And this release is a huge testimonial to that.
4
Brutal Resonance

Nahtaivel - Epicus Doomicus Electronicus

8.0
"Great"
N/A
Electroracle
Spotify
Released off label 2014
I just recently reviewed Nahtaivel on the site, and, being the savvy reviewer I am, I was able to get a hold of their most recent album, Epicus Doomicus Electronicus. And, what I can tell you is that I am already enjoying this one much more than their previous effort.

Galactica starts off this album, and rids the screaming vocals from the song. In turn, we're delivered a nice tribal song with wonderful drum work, ritual like chanting and electronics that adhere to the overall theme of the song. Wonderfully done.

Life:Abomination cracks back to some nice and lovely hard beats and the like, but still offers something new that the act has yet to present in the past. Also, the vocals come in as harshly distorted, which fit very well. This album has been described as displaying apocalyptic electronic music, and this track added to that label.

Green Hell offered a more toned down electronic song with vocal work that paired itself to the previous, distorted whisper screams. The song does make a louder play later on, so that was a very welcome addition.

The Void sets the first vocal set that's not as distorted as the rest. More metal inspired than before, the drum work really made a show. During the chorus, the synth work took a step up and dominated.

Endless Galaxies Part I offered a sort of epic song, one that spoke of either a long digested planetary adventure in an effort to save the galaxy, or just a personal struggle being overcome. By far, not bad at all, and very enjoyable.

Allein was the shortest song on the album just clocking in at two minutes and fifteen seconds. Nonetheless, it delivered another track with a few samples here and there and neat little effects scattered about.

Here Comes the Rain featured Luciano Cardoso, a synthpop artist whose project goes by the name of The Chanceller. With piano work aspiring throughout and the screaming vocals gone, this made for an out of place, albeit very well done song. Perhaps the most shocking and smooth going song I've heard from this act.

Endless Galaxies Part II continued from where the first part ended. Slow moving, minimal at first, the song slowly built into some more fantastic and lovely tribal like sounds near the three minute mark. The vocals hit around the four minute mark, and provided the angry angst that I always look forward to from this project.

Finally, The Twilight Zone hit as the final song. Dark ambient effects and a creepy atmosphere that would have belonged in a sci-fi horror flick really claimed the bulk of this song. It was lovely, and threw me back to a lock of older movies with bad special effects, but were so campy that I just couldn't help but enjoy them.

And, my God, this album is over. The second album that I've listened to by this gentleman is great. There is so much on here to enjoy and take pleasure in that there really is no reason why you're not attempting to get this right now. I think this is one of the most diverse albums I've listened to in quite a while. And, though sometimes albums with multiple spanning themes fail to really capture each genre's respected attributes, Nahtaivel is king at managing a plethora amount of music. And this release is a huge testimonial to that. Jul 04 2014

Off label

Official release released by the artist themselves without the backing of a label.

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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