Fragile Gods - The Future Never Came
Industrial, Electropop Frantz Frederick is a man who is not shy about where his love lies: Cabaret Voltaire, Nitzer Ebb, and various other EBM and industrial pioneers with light your mind as you listen to his music. Almost sounding as if it belongs on a cassette in another time period, Frederick makes music under the moniker Fragile Gods. Simply, flowing EBM tunes with minimal synths and a unique vocal set that isn't quite sung but monotone will put you back in the 80s. 

Fragile God's most notable strong point is his delineation from the common EBM stomp. Everyone anymore wants growling vocals with an emphasis on bass crushing beats. While a couple of artists are able to pull this off with style, there are a million other clones that completely fail. FG is a beast from an old era grooving his way into the new age. 

'City of the Dead' delivers on everything I stated above about his music; minimal synths are involved and a beautiful rhythm is played out. His voice is touched digitally only slightly. It's completely understandable, and in an age where complete distortion to the point you cannot understand a singer is almost mainstream, his technique is quite lovely. Do not just go off this thinking that there's nothing more than a standard EBM beat and lyrics strolling through the song; there are various other electronic elements that will play with your head. 


'All Systems Burn' has a bit more of the electropop influence on it if only because the track has a bit more of a pop to it. I liked how a sample of a simple laugh - the kind that goes "Hahahaha" - was sample bended throughout the song, equalized with the beat, and used as an instrument itself. It was odd, but quite well done. 

The title song, 'The Future Never Came' comes along with an electro feel to it. EBM beats take second place to a blend of intricate trickles of digital goodies along with synths that make a gorgeous backdrop. Lastly, a trippy song by the name of 'The Digital Divide' leads us off the EP. If you can think of quirky sci-fi elements mixed with FG's output then you will have a pretty good idea as to what this final track sounds like. 

Again, Fragile Gods is a pleasant surprise I've come across, and I would not be surprised if he soon enough began making strides forward in the scene. I know for sure - or at least would hope - that fans of older EBM and industrial would have love for Frederick's work under Fragile Gods. And maybe, just maybe, younger crowds will find heart for "The Future That Never Came". 
4
Brutal Resonance

Fragile Gods - The Future Never Came

7.5
"Good"
N/A
Electroracle
Spotify
Released off label 2015
Frantz Frederick is a man who is not shy about where his love lies: Cabaret Voltaire, Nitzer Ebb, and various other EBM and industrial pioneers with light your mind as you listen to his music. Almost sounding as if it belongs on a cassette in another time period, Frederick makes music under the moniker Fragile Gods. Simply, flowing EBM tunes with minimal synths and a unique vocal set that isn't quite sung but monotone will put you back in the 80s. 

Fragile God's most notable strong point is his delineation from the common EBM stomp. Everyone anymore wants growling vocals with an emphasis on bass crushing beats. While a couple of artists are able to pull this off with style, there are a million other clones that completely fail. FG is a beast from an old era grooving his way into the new age. 

'City of the Dead' delivers on everything I stated above about his music; minimal synths are involved and a beautiful rhythm is played out. His voice is touched digitally only slightly. It's completely understandable, and in an age where complete distortion to the point you cannot understand a singer is almost mainstream, his technique is quite lovely. Do not just go off this thinking that there's nothing more than a standard EBM beat and lyrics strolling through the song; there are various other electronic elements that will play with your head. 


'All Systems Burn' has a bit more of the electropop influence on it if only because the track has a bit more of a pop to it. I liked how a sample of a simple laugh - the kind that goes "Hahahaha" - was sample bended throughout the song, equalized with the beat, and used as an instrument itself. It was odd, but quite well done. 

The title song, 'The Future Never Came' comes along with an electro feel to it. EBM beats take second place to a blend of intricate trickles of digital goodies along with synths that make a gorgeous backdrop. Lastly, a trippy song by the name of 'The Digital Divide' leads us off the EP. If you can think of quirky sci-fi elements mixed with FG's output then you will have a pretty good idea as to what this final track sounds like. 

Again, Fragile Gods is a pleasant surprise I've come across, and I would not be surprised if he soon enough began making strides forward in the scene. I know for sure - or at least would hope - that fans of older EBM and industrial would have love for Frederick's work under Fragile Gods. And maybe, just maybe, younger crowds will find heart for "The Future That Never Came". 
Jan 17 2016

Off label

Official relesae released by the artist themselves without the backing of a label.

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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Started in spring 2009, Brutal Resonance quickly grew from a Swedish based netzine into an established International zine of the highest standard.

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