Some years have passed since I made an interview with you guys (for Neurozine.com). What has happen since then?
- "The world has spun a great number of rotations since then, many moons have passed and many kats have been out late at nights, chasing their inner dreams to become one of the very few selected kats who gets to mjau at the moon. In our case (besides being out late at nights), this also means we have been deeply submerged in the studio, chaining our souls into the time consuming craft of making this album, or, one could also simply say... its been a while..."

The obvious question now would be, why did the album take so long?
- "We decided to take the time needed to make the album, mostly because we wanted to find the perfect sound for the album overall. As we see it, the difference between a really super kickass monster album, and a good album, is time. Time to sit down, re-arrange and edit all those little things to make it sound perfect. Time to make sure each and every track is all that it can be, as maxed out as possible. Time to listen to the tracks after 3 months, just to check it they really are as good as when we first made them. So time is very important to us. We are firm believers in the idea of putting vast amounts of time and effort into what we do."

Your debut album is kind of wicked; the sound is brutal but rhythmic, making you want to shake the booty as they say. What is the driving force behind it?
- "For us the mission was clear from very early on; to make one of the best noise albums ever, to have people on the dance floor blow as many fuses in the brain as humanly possible, and yes, it does have that brutal, raw naked feeling, as this was one priority that we set up for the album. Rhythmic noise in combination with some techno, add a bit of industry and you got the 'Skrammelpop' album."

So, I remember you guys once told me that you want people to move when they hear your music, and listening to 'Skrammelpop' I know it's pretty impossible to not move, or at least want to move. What do you think is people's first impression of the album?
- "We had the idea that every tracks we make should be reaching out to people in one way or another, grabbing them and start the process in their brains that says "Go! Go! Move!". Naturally we hope to get people to release their own crazy versions of Fred Astaire dance moves on the dance floors. You know, either if people go absolute berserk on the dance floor, or simply stand in the bar and just nodding their head, both ways are equally great and shows that we made an impact on that persons life, if only for a short period of time. The berserkers on the dance floor will hopefully be going into a state of non awareness, totally into that here and now kind of feeling where everything else gone. The music then becomes all. And on the other side, the head poppers in the bar are perhaps not even aware of the fact that they are indeed tapping their feet and bumping up and down in the very same non aware miniature yoyo-style. In both cases, the behavior is already built into all of us, and the sublime sonic message tap into our brains and makes us move either this way or that way. It's like rocket science, but for kats. Of course this theory could be completely wrong, it could simply be that our album is just extremely awesome. In any case, we hope to make people move in one way or the other."

What's the best part and what's the worst part of the album?
- "The best part of the album is that we had the total liberty to take as much time as we wanted to produce this album. It's all thanks to Torny Gottberg at Progress Productions and we are extremely grateful to be given this long time. It's the best gift ever, time to make it the absolute best album we possibly could. The worst part of the album... well, since we had an abundance of time for this album, there is no worst part of the album. The worst parts didn't make it into becoming part of the album. They were rooted out along the way, scrapped and deleted, gone with the wind. Hasta la dista, baby. We think we ended up with a close to perfect album in every single aspect. We made the tracks into pure noise killers, got awesome mastering by Jouni Ollila, supreme eye candy pictures for both album and promotion by Magnus Eklund, all well contained by our dear teddy bear Torny Gottberg at Progress Productions. We dare say, its as perfect as it gets."

Explain Kopfer Kat!
- "We actually made a track about this very subject, its on the album and is titled "2mT". It tells you all there is to know about Kopfer Kat. Or, well... the only thing this mega track doesn't bring into the light is possibly the phenomena called dogs. However, we try to explain this peculiar creature on another track on the album, although we are not sure we understand the general concept about dogs. We gather it's an odd species what tends to go "woof" allot."

Who's the brain and who's the muscles in Kopfer Kat?
- "Whenever one of us does something, it's always in conjunction with the other. It's a form of direct symbiosis. We are so close at minds that we both think the same about almost everything. So we usually do things in the same way. This is especially true in the studio, where we both have the same overall idea about what we want from a track."

The scene then, what about it? What's it like today?
- "We don't really know about the scene today or tomorrow, as its constantly changing. We can only hope that we will influence listeners, and perhaps party promoters, to be more open minded about all kinds of music. This way the art form of music will grow, and maybe even change the scene."

Any upcoming gigs?
- "The album is just released so we haven't had any requests yet, although we hope to get a few live bookings later in autumn/winter. To keep you updated on this, all live bookings will be posted on the Kopfer Kat website."

Last question, strawberries or chocolate?
- "Yes. With distortion, lots of distortion. And kats, lots of kats."
Kopfer Kat interview
June 14, 2010
Brutal Resonance

Kopfer Kat

Jun 2010
Some years have passed since I made an interview with you guys (for Neurozine.com). What has happen since then?
- "The world has spun a great number of rotations since then, many moons have passed and many kats have been out late at nights, chasing their inner dreams to become one of the very few selected kats who gets to mjau at the moon. In our case (besides being out late at nights), this also means we have been deeply submerged in the studio, chaining our souls into the time consuming craft of making this album, or, one could also simply say... its been a while..."

The obvious question now would be, why did the album take so long?
- "We decided to take the time needed to make the album, mostly because we wanted to find the perfect sound for the album overall. As we see it, the difference between a really super kickass monster album, and a good album, is time. Time to sit down, re-arrange and edit all those little things to make it sound perfect. Time to make sure each and every track is all that it can be, as maxed out as possible. Time to listen to the tracks after 3 months, just to check it they really are as good as when we first made them. So time is very important to us. We are firm believers in the idea of putting vast amounts of time and effort into what we do."

Your debut album is kind of wicked; the sound is brutal but rhythmic, making you want to shake the booty as they say. What is the driving force behind it?
- "For us the mission was clear from very early on; to make one of the best noise albums ever, to have people on the dance floor blow as many fuses in the brain as humanly possible, and yes, it does have that brutal, raw naked feeling, as this was one priority that we set up for the album. Rhythmic noise in combination with some techno, add a bit of industry and you got the 'Skrammelpop' album."

So, I remember you guys once told me that you want people to move when they hear your music, and listening to 'Skrammelpop' I know it's pretty impossible to not move, or at least want to move. What do you think is people's first impression of the album?
- "We had the idea that every tracks we make should be reaching out to people in one way or another, grabbing them and start the process in their brains that says "Go! Go! Move!". Naturally we hope to get people to release their own crazy versions of Fred Astaire dance moves on the dance floors. You know, either if people go absolute berserk on the dance floor, or simply stand in the bar and just nodding their head, both ways are equally great and shows that we made an impact on that persons life, if only for a short period of time. The berserkers on the dance floor will hopefully be going into a state of non awareness, totally into that here and now kind of feeling where everything else gone. The music then becomes all. And on the other side, the head poppers in the bar are perhaps not even aware of the fact that they are indeed tapping their feet and bumping up and down in the very same non aware miniature yoyo-style. In both cases, the behavior is already built into all of us, and the sublime sonic message tap into our brains and makes us move either this way or that way. It's like rocket science, but for kats. Of course this theory could be completely wrong, it could simply be that our album is just extremely awesome. In any case, we hope to make people move in one way or the other."

What's the best part and what's the worst part of the album?
- "The best part of the album is that we had the total liberty to take as much time as we wanted to produce this album. It's all thanks to Torny Gottberg at Progress Productions and we are extremely grateful to be given this long time. It's the best gift ever, time to make it the absolute best album we possibly could. The worst part of the album... well, since we had an abundance of time for this album, there is no worst part of the album. The worst parts didn't make it into becoming part of the album. They were rooted out along the way, scrapped and deleted, gone with the wind. Hasta la dista, baby. We think we ended up with a close to perfect album in every single aspect. We made the tracks into pure noise killers, got awesome mastering by Jouni Ollila, supreme eye candy pictures for both album and promotion by Magnus Eklund, all well contained by our dear teddy bear Torny Gottberg at Progress Productions. We dare say, its as perfect as it gets."

Explain Kopfer Kat!
- "We actually made a track about this very subject, its on the album and is titled "2mT". It tells you all there is to know about Kopfer Kat. Or, well... the only thing this mega track doesn't bring into the light is possibly the phenomena called dogs. However, we try to explain this peculiar creature on another track on the album, although we are not sure we understand the general concept about dogs. We gather it's an odd species what tends to go "woof" allot."

Who's the brain and who's the muscles in Kopfer Kat?
- "Whenever one of us does something, it's always in conjunction with the other. It's a form of direct symbiosis. We are so close at minds that we both think the same about almost everything. So we usually do things in the same way. This is especially true in the studio, where we both have the same overall idea about what we want from a track."

The scene then, what about it? What's it like today?
- "We don't really know about the scene today or tomorrow, as its constantly changing. We can only hope that we will influence listeners, and perhaps party promoters, to be more open minded about all kinds of music. This way the art form of music will grow, and maybe even change the scene."

Any upcoming gigs?
- "The album is just released so we haven't had any requests yet, although we hope to get a few live bookings later in autumn/winter. To keep you updated on this, all live bookings will be posted on the Kopfer Kat website."

Last question, strawberries or chocolate?
- "Yes. With distortion, lots of distortion. And kats, lots of kats."
Jun 14 2010

John Wikström

info@brutalresonance.com
Writer and contributor on Brutal Resonance

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Started in spring 2009, Brutal Resonance quickly grew from a Swedish based netzine into an established International zine of the highest standard.

We cover genres like Synthpop, EBM, Industrial, Dark Ambient, Neofolk, Darkwave, Noise and all their sub- and similar genres.

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