Ubre Blanca - The Sadist
Soundtrack, Synthwave Ah, it is getting close to that time of year again when spooky delights and furious frights are bound to be everywhere and anywhere. The kids will line up behind doors, knocking, waiting, wanting their treats to come in full swing. On the other side, the local teens will be out trying to get their drink on, partying, and having a sinful time. All the while, a sinister, vengeful being with be right behind them, waiting for them to isolate themselves in their over egotistical, child-like egos. And, when they do, the slasher will gut them and wreak havoc on both them and their small, little town. This is the exact feeling I get as I get through Ubre Blanca's "The Sadist". 

Newcomers to the Giallo Disco Records' family, Ubre Blanca is the love child of Joel Stone and Andy Brown, both of whom have been involved in projects such as Shitdisco, Divorce, and Remember Remember. Like most other artists on Giallo, Ubre Blanca surrounds themselves with a veil of 80s horror soundtracks, influenced by legendary scores from classic horror films. The horror synthwave crossovers with soundtrack design, as if "The Sadist" has been written for a film not yet thought of. 

I am one to believe that there is a story behind the soundtrack, as mystical as it is fascinating. The lead and title track comes across first, documenting The Sadist's first kill. A lone teen will be the catalyst for his killing spree, shaking the town who may think this will be a one time incident, but as he continues, nothing will stop him. A sooth chill lasts for the first seven minutes, and as the camera pans to a blood soaked moon, a credit sequence rolls out in strict, gore drenched text.

As an investigation unfolds by the dead teen's friends, it leads them to the killing grounds of 'The Quarry'. A speedy tune makes you know that the group is panicked but also aren't leaving until they find something. That something, be it an old newspaper, perhaps even left behind by the Sadist on purpose, will lead them to their next discovery, and death.  As the song ends, a quietness erupts as the friends come across their first revelation. 

'Fear Of God' documents the next kill as the Sadist plucks apart the friends one by one, leading them to argue amongst themselves and turn on one another. It is at this point that they wonder if they should be fearing the murderer, or each other. But, as they continue, they close in on the Sadist's lair. Upon arriving there, they find him or her standing in a retired sanctuary, one for a death cult, where a religious hymn plays out of thin air. 'Saeta' is that mournful but hopeful tune that whispers into their ears. 

Lastly, the friends discover the plot for this being was not to kill for fun or pleasure, but to summon a beast worse than anything mankind has ever seen before. 'Invocation' plays as the final fight happens. Against insurmountable odds and a Holy, but rugged electronic beat, the teens lose a member, but ultimately defeat this entity once and for all. A hopeful, guitar and drum rigged segment closes out the film, but not before we see a whisper of life from the so called dead Sadist as the cops and townsfolk come to see whether or not this was an elaborate hoax or something more. 

This entire idea that I have in my head may just be speculation, but I'll be damned if I can't like an album that inspires so much creativity in my brain. "The Sadist" has made me want to write a film just because it sounds so good, and I may just work on that tonight. Who knows, maybe I'll become one of the next great horror directors alongside Carpenter and Craven, though that is by far a goal that is near impossible to reach. Either way, Ubre Blanca is a completely welcome addition to the Giallo roster, and I would love to hear what they can crank out next. 
4
Brutal Resonance

Ubre Blanca - The Sadist

Ah, it is getting close to that time of year again when spooky delights and furious frights are bound to be everywhere and anywhere. The kids will line up behind doors, knocking, waiting, wanting their treats to come in full swing. On the other side, the local teens will be out trying to get their drink on, partying, and having a sinful time. All the while, a sinister, vengeful being with be right behind them, waiting for them to isolate themselves in their over egotistical, child-like egos. And, when they do, the slasher will gut them and wreak havoc on both them and their small, little town. This is the exact feeling I get as I get through Ubre Blanca's "The Sadist". 

Newcomers to the Giallo Disco Records' family, Ubre Blanca is the love child of Joel Stone and Andy Brown, both of whom have been involved in projects such as Shitdisco, Divorce, and Remember Remember. Like most other artists on Giallo, Ubre Blanca surrounds themselves with a veil of 80s horror soundtracks, influenced by legendary scores from classic horror films. The horror synthwave crossovers with soundtrack design, as if "The Sadist" has been written for a film not yet thought of. 

I am one to believe that there is a story behind the soundtrack, as mystical as it is fascinating. The lead and title track comes across first, documenting The Sadist's first kill. A lone teen will be the catalyst for his killing spree, shaking the town who may think this will be a one time incident, but as he continues, nothing will stop him. A sooth chill lasts for the first seven minutes, and as the camera pans to a blood soaked moon, a credit sequence rolls out in strict, gore drenched text.

As an investigation unfolds by the dead teen's friends, it leads them to the killing grounds of 'The Quarry'. A speedy tune makes you know that the group is panicked but also aren't leaving until they find something. That something, be it an old newspaper, perhaps even left behind by the Sadist on purpose, will lead them to their next discovery, and death.  As the song ends, a quietness erupts as the friends come across their first revelation. 

'Fear Of God' documents the next kill as the Sadist plucks apart the friends one by one, leading them to argue amongst themselves and turn on one another. It is at this point that they wonder if they should be fearing the murderer, or each other. But, as they continue, they close in on the Sadist's lair. Upon arriving there, they find him or her standing in a retired sanctuary, one for a death cult, where a religious hymn plays out of thin air. 'Saeta' is that mournful but hopeful tune that whispers into their ears. 

Lastly, the friends discover the plot for this being was not to kill for fun or pleasure, but to summon a beast worse than anything mankind has ever seen before. 'Invocation' plays as the final fight happens. Against insurmountable odds and a Holy, but rugged electronic beat, the teens lose a member, but ultimately defeat this entity once and for all. A hopeful, guitar and drum rigged segment closes out the film, but not before we see a whisper of life from the so called dead Sadist as the cops and townsfolk come to see whether or not this was an elaborate hoax or something more. 

This entire idea that I have in my head may just be speculation, but I'll be damned if I can't like an album that inspires so much creativity in my brain. "The Sadist" has made me want to write a film just because it sounds so good, and I may just work on that tonight. Who knows, maybe I'll become one of the next great horror directors alongside Carpenter and Craven, though that is by far a goal that is near impossible to reach. Either way, Ubre Blanca is a completely welcome addition to the Giallo roster, and I would love to hear what they can crank out next. 
Sep 17 2015

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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