Proteque - Demons Will Bring Us Together
Dark Ambient, Drone What we have here is another Proteque release, one which still stays within this solo project's dark ambient/drone domain while delving into something a bit more than what we're used to. Still clinging onto the analogue sounds from the tapes he sometimes records on while adding in drums makes for an interesting combination, but, it does not always hold up for the best.

And, when I say that, I mean it. The album is a twist on the dark ambient and drone nature of this project, but it doesn't hold well together in every case. The second song, Mainstream Beauty, comes off pretty well. We're given a solid minute of light material, the drums ever so slightly coming into the foreground. And then we're hit with drums for the rest of the song, minus a few slow parts, for a good ten minutes. And it really doesn't do the song much justice; I'd have to say that this is one occasion where I wish the song was shorter rather than longer.

I suppose the first song on the album was decent in length, but, even then, the drums sounded exactly the same on the second track, which made replay for both of these songs almost null and void. The third track, Lake Of Assumptions, did well in fixing the problems I found within the first two songs. It made out for a very synth based, and very sad sounding ambient soundtrack piece. It was very inspiring, and very peaceful. I took pleasure in listening to every minute of this song.

And, even the next song made beautiful and depressing, yet revelation-like sounds that came out very well. A Certain Kind Of Song almost sounds like the type you'd hear at a royal wedding ceremony as two lovers finally are able to hold and embrace one another for the world to see. It was a joy. The ending of the song, as the drone sounds mix in with the synths, is sheer ecstasy building up through your body.

And the final, almost hidden track (as it's not available on the BandCamp page, nor is it listed as a track) continues the trend of making drone sounds mix with the synths in an extremely, dream like fantasy fashion. It almost seemed like the end of the previous track was continued on into full length with this one. It was another glorious piece.

Now, if I could say how much I enjoyed the last three songs, I would say that they are simply beautiful and awe inspiring to me. However, what spoils this album would have to be the first two tracks which I find to be very, very boring. It's a good thing that they were at the beginning, and not the end. Because it's always the conclusion of an album that counts; it will leave the listener off with something to remember you by, and that's how I feel about this album. Despite it having its weak points, I am truly glad to say I discovered the light in this work. Take a look at it, if only for half the playlist.
4
Brutal Resonance

Proteque - Demons Will Bring Us Together

7.0
"Good"
N/A
Electroracle
Spotify
Released off label 2013
What we have here is another Proteque release, one which still stays within this solo project's dark ambient/drone domain while delving into something a bit more than what we're used to. Still clinging onto the analogue sounds from the tapes he sometimes records on while adding in drums makes for an interesting combination, but, it does not always hold up for the best.

And, when I say that, I mean it. The album is a twist on the dark ambient and drone nature of this project, but it doesn't hold well together in every case. The second song, Mainstream Beauty, comes off pretty well. We're given a solid minute of light material, the drums ever so slightly coming into the foreground. And then we're hit with drums for the rest of the song, minus a few slow parts, for a good ten minutes. And it really doesn't do the song much justice; I'd have to say that this is one occasion where I wish the song was shorter rather than longer.

I suppose the first song on the album was decent in length, but, even then, the drums sounded exactly the same on the second track, which made replay for both of these songs almost null and void. The third track, Lake Of Assumptions, did well in fixing the problems I found within the first two songs. It made out for a very synth based, and very sad sounding ambient soundtrack piece. It was very inspiring, and very peaceful. I took pleasure in listening to every minute of this song.

And, even the next song made beautiful and depressing, yet revelation-like sounds that came out very well. A Certain Kind Of Song almost sounds like the type you'd hear at a royal wedding ceremony as two lovers finally are able to hold and embrace one another for the world to see. It was a joy. The ending of the song, as the drone sounds mix in with the synths, is sheer ecstasy building up through your body.

And the final, almost hidden track (as it's not available on the BandCamp page, nor is it listed as a track) continues the trend of making drone sounds mix with the synths in an extremely, dream like fantasy fashion. It almost seemed like the end of the previous track was continued on into full length with this one. It was another glorious piece.

Now, if I could say how much I enjoyed the last three songs, I would say that they are simply beautiful and awe inspiring to me. However, what spoils this album would have to be the first two tracks which I find to be very, very boring. It's a good thing that they were at the beginning, and not the end. Because it's always the conclusion of an album that counts; it will leave the listener off with something to remember you by, and that's how I feel about this album. Despite it having its weak points, I am truly glad to say I discovered the light in this work. Take a look at it, if only for half the playlist. Mar 04 2014

Off label

Official relesae released by the artist themselves without the backing of a label.

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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Started in spring 2009, Brutal Resonance quickly grew from a Swedish based netzine into an established International zine of the highest standard.

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