Angelspit has been pouring out industrial and electro goodness for the past ten years, promoting an open mind and body as well as an overall positive message for outcasts around the world. Angelspit is continuing their unique brand of dark electronics with their seventh studio album BLACK DOG BITE. Combining 90s cyberpunk sounds with destructive lyrics with a dark, humorous twist, BLACK DOG BITE is shaping up to be one of their best albums to date. We got an interview with founder of Angelspit ZOOG VON ROCK, so sit back and learn all about the new album plus some! 


Hello there Zoog and welcome to Brutal Resonance! I can't believe this is the first time we've had you on the site for a chat. Either way, you have a brand new album Black Dog Bite coming out in a couple of days. How do you get in the weeks before release? Are you nervous, excited, a little bit of both or just completely chill?

Zoog:  Thank you! I am both nervous and excited leading into the release. It's a little nerve wracking because It's REALLY scary putting yourself out there, but I have come to learn that you have nothing to lose. People will either love it, hate it or be indifferent...but that's all part of the thrill! Increasingly it is more important that I complete an album to the highest standard I can achieve, then released it.

I've been reading up on the album via the press releases you've sent out, and I've gotta say that you are giving this album heaps of praise. Do you think that Black Dog Bite is your best album yet, or would you consider it equal to some of your other releases?

Zoog:  Funny you should say this, as I never thought of it as self-praise - I am just really happy with it and I know some people will like it too. It's solid. It's brutal. It ROCKS! I think it's one of the best albums, plus it definitely sounds different. I try and make each album sound different - Black Dog Bite is dirty cyberpunk.

You have more albums, singles and EPs out that I can count, and this time around you're going for a nineties cyberpunk sound. What did you do differently on this album to achieve that? Take us through the thought process you have when you make a song in the cyberpunk vein.

Zoog:  There is a lot of ground in this album that I have not covered before - it's always fun to try something different. The beats are simple and driving. The bass lines are more rhythmic and syncopated plus the choice of bass sounds are something new for me. I used the traditional fat analog synth bass, but also experimented with slap bass and sharp twangy digital synths. I wrote several bass lines on different instruments, then cut them up and mixed between each instrument. It gives a jerky, spatters feel. The drums are lo-fi samples of early digital drum machines. Lo-fi 80s samplers were extensively used. I also sampled a lot of metallic clangs and scrapes which were slashed, bled and looped to create something new. The lyrics are political. I also touch on relationships - which is something I've never done before. The vocals are sung, not screamed, then heavily processed. Finally I applied layers of crunchy distortion. Pounding beats. Distorted angry music. Fuck yeah, fists in the air!

Were there any other mediums that you looked to for inspiration for “Black Dog Bite”? Any works of science fiction in movies, books, or video games to garner creative output?

Lyrically, I address depression - many of us have to deal with it. Churchill referred to his depression as the "Black Dog", hence the album title. Besides a large diet funk music, one band that inspired me was Scritti Politti. Their bass lines are very interesting - they'll cut a bass line between different instruments to give a chatty, stuttering 80s pop sound. I did something similar to this but used harsh instruments playing evil bass lines. My biggest influence has always been Angelspit supporters. We talk about politics, relationships and music at shows and online. Our conversations get weaved into the lyrics. I listen to their thoughts on music and often incorporate them into the music. Their opinions and experience matters to me. 

This album chimes in with personal lyrics and sarcasm covering topics such as political chaos, consumerism, social media, and a bunch of other topics. How did you reflect that in the lyrics? Did you write specific songs to deal with each subject matter separately, or did you cover more than one topic per song?

Zoog:  Each song covers a different topic, but they are all related - as many of our society's problems share common roots. I mentioned using conversations with supporters in my lyrics. I have found many people are concerned about similar things - hence there is a common theme in Angelspit's lyrics. I try and write lyrics with humor in them, even when covering serious subject matter. A situation can be funny if you look at it from a different angle....and when you look at in that new you might find a solution. If you want to read the lyrics, you can watch the lyric videos for the songs on Youtube.


This may be tough to answer, but what is your personal favorite song on the album and why?

Zoog:  I have three: 'GREAT BANK IN THE SKY' is a typical fast pound "bang-bang-clang-clang-fuck-you" Angelspit track. It was the second last song I wrote. I started with lyrics and a very simple drum beat. The music was built on the rhythm of the vocals. It came together quickly and was great fun to write. 'SCORPIO MACHINE' was the last song I wrote. It's dark, slow and sexy. I wanted to create something for demons if they wanted to do a strip tease. Chris Davis (HumanTwelve) is doing a video for it. I'm hyped because I love what Chris does. He also did the video for 'Sky High' and 'Ambassador'. 'BANG BANG BANG' is an instrumental and inspired by my dear friend (and band mate) Kitsu Noir (who also runs Dark Star Fusion). Kitsu has a taste for fat, glitchy dance instrumentals - so I wrote this for him. Keith Jensen (the genius behind BrainWomb ) is doing a video for it. Keith also did the videos for 'Channel Hell', 'Pretty Dead Boys' and 'New Devil'. I can't wait to see what he does - I love his work!

And with this album you are mixing in a ton of different genres. Of course, the cyberpunk aesthetic is first and foremost, but industrial, electro, punk, and who knows what else into the mix. Do you ever feel as if you're throwing too much into the album, or do you never think there's too much music for one piece?

Zoog:  A song is a living being. It has a soul, a physique, it wears clothes, and it's often armed. The most important thing is to define it's soul. Is it just or evil? What makes it angry? Does it want revenge? Next is it's body. Is it smooth or prickly? Is it muscular and strong? Large and stomping? Or maybe Petite and fast like a cat? Does it have fur? How big are its teeth? What about it's clothes? Does it like leather or does it prefer chain mail? How much of it's skin does it reveal? Can you see it's face or does it wear a mask? Finally, what weapon does it carry? Or maybe it's not a weapon, maybe it's a tool to fix something. It is powered by electricity, petrol or steam? These are the questions I ask when writing a song, because I'm going to let this creature loose in your head...and i want it too wreck the right kind of havoc. If I can see the creature, I can hear it's song - as each of these attributes suggest rhythm, style, chord progression, tonality and lyric content. It wears the clothes according to it's taste - as it uses different musical influences to express it's soul. It will dress itself with as much or as little as it sees fit. The song dictates it's own direction and style...I'm just a wardrobe assistant! This approach might sound abstract, but try it next time you have writers block - I guarantee it will help you write an amazing song.

I also saw that you have Black Dog Bite coming out on Vinyl – the first Angelspit album to be produced in the format. Did you do this out of personal want and desire, or was it more or less for the demand of vinyl with the modern audience/

Zoog:  I've wanted to do vinyl for years, but the cost was always holding me back. My friend  Jason Hall at Ruined Vibes offered to help with Black Dog Bite - he made it the coolest adventure. Jason is a vinyl enthusiast, and showed me how awesome you can make a record look. We worked together to make it something VERY special! It comes with stickers, a Japanese style obi and a zine. The zine is full of thoughts about dealing with depression.


And as of right now, what are your future plans? Do you have any live shows or tours lined up for Angelspit? Do you have any singles or remix EPs planned for the future to support Black Dog Bite?

Zoog:  I am getting all the pre-orders out. It's important that I include a signed thank you note with EVERY pre-order, as I want to personally thank every person who supported. I would love to do a remix CD, I have not done one in over two years and I am overdue for one. I am planning a tour in 2018 - I will hopefully get back to the UK and Europe.....but the big one is dealing with my US Visa status. I am an Australian living in the USA on a visa, and it sucks. (Insert massive paranoid political rant here).

This is a question out of curiosity more so for myself than anything, but what have you been listening to lately? Any new bands that you think deserve more recognition?

Zoog:  I am currently listening to 70s Rock - ELO, Fleetwood Mac, Super Tramp, Abba. Their songs are well crafted and put together masterfully. I am also listening to 90s Australian Rock: Regurgitator, Spider Bait, Happy Land, Severed Heads. I love how they are aggressive and playful. This music sounds like they are individuals who are members of the same tribe. Each is different, but have similar war-paint. There is a modern trend for music within a genre to sound very similar - same sounds, same beats, same tempo, same colors, same vocal sound. I want Angelspit to be unique. I want each album to be a journey into another sonic world. New adventure, new monsters, new armor. The main artist I listen to is Bowie. His later work takes my breath away. Outside, Reality, Black Star are brilliant.

New artists to watch: May May Macabre, I am loving his brash, edgy style of glitter punk. He goes ALL OUT - it's great fun. Lorelei Dreaming, her smooth sultry vocals over dark wave future pop is a dream. I worked with her on her debut EP and it was great fun. Gasoline Invertebrate, the new band from Brian Graupner (the Gothsicles). This is hard and dirty - love it. Adventu Impar, these guys cross breed metal, breakbeat and grit.You need to hear this band. PLANET://DAMAGE, this guy is resource for cyberpunk, he has a great insight into the subject...I'm convinced he's an escaped Nexus 6. His music is true to early 90s Industrial and Cyberpunk, but with a modern edge. Repulsur, I LOVE WHAT THIS GIRL DOES! She is Rock'n'Rock in the flesh. You need to know about this band!

Lastly, I thank you for your time and wish you the best of luck with Black Dog Bite! We leave the space below free for you to insert any last words. Cheers!

Zoog:  Thank you! I want to encourage you to support you community - go to clubs, subscribe to podcasts, support the bands you like. It is very important that we strengthen our community, and introduce people into our fold. Our tribe is important - especially in this time of political unrest.
Angelspit interview
October 8, 2017
Brutal Resonance

Angelspit

Oct 2017
Angelspit has been pouring out industrial and electro goodness for the past ten years, promoting an open mind and body as well as an overall positive message for outcasts around the world. Angelspit is continuing their unique brand of dark electronics with their seventh studio album BLACK DOG BITE. Combining 90s cyberpunk sounds with destructive lyrics with a dark, humorous twist, BLACK DOG BITE is shaping up to be one of their best albums to date. We got an interview with founder of Angelspit ZOOG VON ROCK, so sit back and learn all about the new album plus some! 


Hello there Zoog and welcome to Brutal Resonance! I can't believe this is the first time we've had you on the site for a chat. Either way, you have a brand new album Black Dog Bite coming out in a couple of days. How do you get in the weeks before release? Are you nervous, excited, a little bit of both or just completely chill?

Zoog:  Thank you! I am both nervous and excited leading into the release. It's a little nerve wracking because It's REALLY scary putting yourself out there, but I have come to learn that you have nothing to lose. People will either love it, hate it or be indifferent...but that's all part of the thrill! Increasingly it is more important that I complete an album to the highest standard I can achieve, then released it.

I've been reading up on the album via the press releases you've sent out, and I've gotta say that you are giving this album heaps of praise. Do you think that Black Dog Bite is your best album yet, or would you consider it equal to some of your other releases?

Zoog:  Funny you should say this, as I never thought of it as self-praise - I am just really happy with it and I know some people will like it too. It's solid. It's brutal. It ROCKS! I think it's one of the best albums, plus it definitely sounds different. I try and make each album sound different - Black Dog Bite is dirty cyberpunk.

You have more albums, singles and EPs out that I can count, and this time around you're going for a nineties cyberpunk sound. What did you do differently on this album to achieve that? Take us through the thought process you have when you make a song in the cyberpunk vein.

Zoog:  There is a lot of ground in this album that I have not covered before - it's always fun to try something different. The beats are simple and driving. The bass lines are more rhythmic and syncopated plus the choice of bass sounds are something new for me. I used the traditional fat analog synth bass, but also experimented with slap bass and sharp twangy digital synths. I wrote several bass lines on different instruments, then cut them up and mixed between each instrument. It gives a jerky, spatters feel. The drums are lo-fi samples of early digital drum machines. Lo-fi 80s samplers were extensively used. I also sampled a lot of metallic clangs and scrapes which were slashed, bled and looped to create something new. The lyrics are political. I also touch on relationships - which is something I've never done before. The vocals are sung, not screamed, then heavily processed. Finally I applied layers of crunchy distortion. Pounding beats. Distorted angry music. Fuck yeah, fists in the air!

Were there any other mediums that you looked to for inspiration for “Black Dog Bite”? Any works of science fiction in movies, books, or video games to garner creative output?

Lyrically, I address depression - many of us have to deal with it. Churchill referred to his depression as the "Black Dog", hence the album title. Besides a large diet funk music, one band that inspired me was Scritti Politti. Their bass lines are very interesting - they'll cut a bass line between different instruments to give a chatty, stuttering 80s pop sound. I did something similar to this but used harsh instruments playing evil bass lines. My biggest influence has always been Angelspit supporters. We talk about politics, relationships and music at shows and online. Our conversations get weaved into the lyrics. I listen to their thoughts on music and often incorporate them into the music. Their opinions and experience matters to me. 

This album chimes in with personal lyrics and sarcasm covering topics such as political chaos, consumerism, social media, and a bunch of other topics. How did you reflect that in the lyrics? Did you write specific songs to deal with each subject matter separately, or did you cover more than one topic per song?

Zoog:  Each song covers a different topic, but they are all related - as many of our society's problems share common roots. I mentioned using conversations with supporters in my lyrics. I have found many people are concerned about similar things - hence there is a common theme in Angelspit's lyrics. I try and write lyrics with humor in them, even when covering serious subject matter. A situation can be funny if you look at it from a different angle....and when you look at in that new you might find a solution. If you want to read the lyrics, you can watch the lyric videos for the songs on Youtube.


This may be tough to answer, but what is your personal favorite song on the album and why?

Zoog:  I have three: 'GREAT BANK IN THE SKY' is a typical fast pound "bang-bang-clang-clang-fuck-you" Angelspit track. It was the second last song I wrote. I started with lyrics and a very simple drum beat. The music was built on the rhythm of the vocals. It came together quickly and was great fun to write. 'SCORPIO MACHINE' was the last song I wrote. It's dark, slow and sexy. I wanted to create something for demons if they wanted to do a strip tease. Chris Davis (HumanTwelve) is doing a video for it. I'm hyped because I love what Chris does. He also did the video for 'Sky High' and 'Ambassador'. 'BANG BANG BANG' is an instrumental and inspired by my dear friend (and band mate) Kitsu Noir (who also runs Dark Star Fusion). Kitsu has a taste for fat, glitchy dance instrumentals - so I wrote this for him. Keith Jensen (the genius behind BrainWomb ) is doing a video for it. Keith also did the videos for 'Channel Hell', 'Pretty Dead Boys' and 'New Devil'. I can't wait to see what he does - I love his work!

And with this album you are mixing in a ton of different genres. Of course, the cyberpunk aesthetic is first and foremost, but industrial, electro, punk, and who knows what else into the mix. Do you ever feel as if you're throwing too much into the album, or do you never think there's too much music for one piece?

Zoog:  A song is a living being. It has a soul, a physique, it wears clothes, and it's often armed. The most important thing is to define it's soul. Is it just or evil? What makes it angry? Does it want revenge? Next is it's body. Is it smooth or prickly? Is it muscular and strong? Large and stomping? Or maybe Petite and fast like a cat? Does it have fur? How big are its teeth? What about it's clothes? Does it like leather or does it prefer chain mail? How much of it's skin does it reveal? Can you see it's face or does it wear a mask? Finally, what weapon does it carry? Or maybe it's not a weapon, maybe it's a tool to fix something. It is powered by electricity, petrol or steam? These are the questions I ask when writing a song, because I'm going to let this creature loose in your head...and i want it too wreck the right kind of havoc. If I can see the creature, I can hear it's song - as each of these attributes suggest rhythm, style, chord progression, tonality and lyric content. It wears the clothes according to it's taste - as it uses different musical influences to express it's soul. It will dress itself with as much or as little as it sees fit. The song dictates it's own direction and style...I'm just a wardrobe assistant! This approach might sound abstract, but try it next time you have writers block - I guarantee it will help you write an amazing song.

I also saw that you have Black Dog Bite coming out on Vinyl – the first Angelspit album to be produced in the format. Did you do this out of personal want and desire, or was it more or less for the demand of vinyl with the modern audience/

Zoog:  I've wanted to do vinyl for years, but the cost was always holding me back. My friend  Jason Hall at Ruined Vibes offered to help with Black Dog Bite - he made it the coolest adventure. Jason is a vinyl enthusiast, and showed me how awesome you can make a record look. We worked together to make it something VERY special! It comes with stickers, a Japanese style obi and a zine. The zine is full of thoughts about dealing with depression.


And as of right now, what are your future plans? Do you have any live shows or tours lined up for Angelspit? Do you have any singles or remix EPs planned for the future to support Black Dog Bite?

Zoog:  I am getting all the pre-orders out. It's important that I include a signed thank you note with EVERY pre-order, as I want to personally thank every person who supported. I would love to do a remix CD, I have not done one in over two years and I am overdue for one. I am planning a tour in 2018 - I will hopefully get back to the UK and Europe.....but the big one is dealing with my US Visa status. I am an Australian living in the USA on a visa, and it sucks. (Insert massive paranoid political rant here).

This is a question out of curiosity more so for myself than anything, but what have you been listening to lately? Any new bands that you think deserve more recognition?

Zoog:  I am currently listening to 70s Rock - ELO, Fleetwood Mac, Super Tramp, Abba. Their songs are well crafted and put together masterfully. I am also listening to 90s Australian Rock: Regurgitator, Spider Bait, Happy Land, Severed Heads. I love how they are aggressive and playful. This music sounds like they are individuals who are members of the same tribe. Each is different, but have similar war-paint. There is a modern trend for music within a genre to sound very similar - same sounds, same beats, same tempo, same colors, same vocal sound. I want Angelspit to be unique. I want each album to be a journey into another sonic world. New adventure, new monsters, new armor. The main artist I listen to is Bowie. His later work takes my breath away. Outside, Reality, Black Star are brilliant.

New artists to watch: May May Macabre, I am loving his brash, edgy style of glitter punk. He goes ALL OUT - it's great fun. Lorelei Dreaming, her smooth sultry vocals over dark wave future pop is a dream. I worked with her on her debut EP and it was great fun. Gasoline Invertebrate, the new band from Brian Graupner (the Gothsicles). This is hard and dirty - love it. Adventu Impar, these guys cross breed metal, breakbeat and grit.You need to hear this band. PLANET://DAMAGE, this guy is resource for cyberpunk, he has a great insight into the subject...I'm convinced he's an escaped Nexus 6. His music is true to early 90s Industrial and Cyberpunk, but with a modern edge. Repulsur, I LOVE WHAT THIS GIRL DOES! She is Rock'n'Rock in the flesh. You need to know about this band!

Lastly, I thank you for your time and wish you the best of luck with Black Dog Bite! We leave the space below free for you to insert any last words. Cheers!

Zoog:  Thank you! I want to encourage you to support you community - go to clubs, subscribe to podcasts, support the bands you like. It is very important that we strengthen our community, and introduce people into our fold. Our tribe is important - especially in this time of political unrest.
Oct 08 2017
Mankind often is too blind to see reality.
Suicide Commando, Jan 01 2004

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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