Antihero Metal, Electro Zardonic Zardonic's "Antihero" can be described as nothing more than multiple shades of metal slamming together with EDM elements that fuse and form dancefloor hits that should be able to please both metal and electronic fans alike. It is really hard for me to just describe this Venezuelan DJs work as just Industrial metal, as it is just so much more complex than a major portion of that genre's standard works. Throughout the entire album, you will come across riveting guitar riffs to crushing electronic bass, with songs interchanging more influence and style from one genre or the next. 'World At War' begins off the album with a static array of war bulletins, gunfire, and general heavy atmospheric content. It helps show off where Zardonic's anger is aiming at, which is a lot of current and real world problems. 'Against All Odds' delivers some damn fine, higher pitched guitar notes and riffs. Basing more of his work on the metal side, the song still manages to provide dirty and sludge filled electronic work that plays well with the Hellish uncompromising onslaught.'For Justice' negates a lot more of the metal elements in favor of hard EDM, but guitar work still manages to steal the spotlight every now and then. Drum'n'bass plays a decent roll throughout the song, but not so much as in 'Crush It'. The song exchanges a slower beat with longer notes riddled throughout on top of speedy D'n'B. I wasn't a huge, huge fan of the vocal delivery in this song as it contradicted the metal screams brought out so far, but the music was nonetheless phenomenal.'Vigilante' shows a return to form vocally, and the kickdrum presented in the song was pretty on spot. I absolutely loved the angst and energy in the song, as it felt revolutionary in spirit and powerful. 'Override' plays a little with dubstep, but this isn't the type of shit that Skrillex would crank out and call music. This is well thought out and not all wobbles and bass. Expect 'Pure Power' to follow on exactly what the title says. An almost non-stop guitar love triangle is formed in the song, and instrumentally it is one of the most impressive tracks on the album. Getting close to the end, 'Raise Hell' just provides another well crafted amalgamation of Zardonic infused metal and electronics. Less dancey and more fit for mosh pits, this track should easily please all you metalheads out there. 'The Time Is Now' has one of the best instrumental sections on the album beginning at the 2:10 mark. This is easily attributed to the noisy polish that brings it out followed by amazing, almost tribal drumwork. An awesome guitar riff leads right out of this and straight back into the bulk of the song. As a final offering, the epilogue 'The Heroes Have Failed' offers an instumental account of everything that we just experienced on the album and more. But, the journey does not end there. An extra hidden track titled 'Highway 666' is hidden on the first disc, and majorly takes a metal stance. I would be hard pressed to even say that there is even the slightest hint of electronics on the song, and it goes to show that Zardonic can roll with the major metal bands if he so chose to do so. Disc Two offers instrumental mixes of six different songs found on disc one, as well as eight remixes from the likes of Rusty K, Counterstrike, Dub Elements, Esparta, Darksiderz, Heavygrinder, Evol Intent, The Outside Agency, and Voicians. While each and every single one of the remixes were absolutely fantastic, I would like to point out my favorite which is Darksiderz hardcore remix of 'Override'. Completely redoing the song, this artist went above and beyond to decimate the song with deep bass drops that will completely make you want to stomp all over a dancefloor. With all this said, I think that Zardonic is a very passionate, very enthusiastic man when it comes to his project. He's always pushing forward and isn't afraid to say what's on his mind no matter the case. He's sure to cater to a multiple array of music fans, and I dare say that a good majority of industrial fans such as yourselves will find his tunes more than accessible. Clashing electronics and metal seldom ever sounds so good then on "Antihero", and Zardonic should be praised for being able to fuse both his genre passions into one wholesome product.  450
Brutal Resonance

Zardonic - Antihero

8.0
"Great"
N/A
Electroracle
Spotify
Released 2015 by eOne Music
Zardonic's "Antihero" can be described as nothing more than multiple shades of metal slamming together with EDM elements that fuse and form dancefloor hits that should be able to please both metal and electronic fans alike. It is really hard for me to just describe this Venezuelan DJs work as just Industrial metal, as it is just so much more complex than a major portion of that genre's standard works. Throughout the entire album, you will come across riveting guitar riffs to crushing electronic bass, with songs interchanging more influence and style from one genre or the next. 

'World At War' begins off the album with a static array of war bulletins, gunfire, and general heavy atmospheric content. It helps show off where Zardonic's anger is aiming at, which is a lot of current and real world problems. 'Against All Odds' delivers some damn fine, higher pitched guitar notes and riffs. Basing more of his work on the metal side, the song still manages to provide dirty and sludge filled electronic work that plays well with the Hellish uncompromising onslaught.

'For Justice' negates a lot more of the metal elements in favor of hard EDM, but guitar work still manages to steal the spotlight every now and then. Drum'n'bass plays a decent roll throughout the song, but not so much as in 'Crush It'. The song exchanges a slower beat with longer notes riddled throughout on top of speedy D'n'B. I wasn't a huge, huge fan of the vocal delivery in this song as it contradicted the metal screams brought out so far, but the music was nonetheless phenomenal.

'Vigilante' shows a return to form vocally, and the kickdrum presented in the song was pretty on spot. I absolutely loved the angst and energy in the song, as it felt revolutionary in spirit and powerful. 'Override' plays a little with dubstep, but this isn't the type of shit that Skrillex would crank out and call music. This is well thought out and not all wobbles and bass. Expect 'Pure Power' to follow on exactly what the title says. An almost non-stop guitar love triangle is formed in the song, and instrumentally it is one of the most impressive tracks on the album. 

Getting close to the end, 'Raise Hell' just provides another well crafted amalgamation of Zardonic infused metal and electronics. Less dancey and more fit for mosh pits, this track should easily please all you metalheads out there. 'The Time Is Now' has one of the best instrumental sections on the album beginning at the 2:10 mark. This is easily attributed to the noisy polish that brings it out followed by amazing, almost tribal drumwork. An awesome guitar riff leads right out of this and straight back into the bulk of the song. 

As a final offering, the epilogue 'The Heroes Have Failed' offers an instumental account of everything that we just experienced on the album and more. But, the journey does not end there. An extra hidden track titled 'Highway 666' is hidden on the first disc, and majorly takes a metal stance. I would be hard pressed to even say that there is even the slightest hint of electronics on the song, and it goes to show that Zardonic can roll with the major metal bands if he so chose to do so. 

Disc Two offers instrumental mixes of six different songs found on disc one, as well as eight remixes from the likes of Rusty K, Counterstrike, Dub Elements, Esparta, Darksiderz, Heavygrinder, Evol Intent, The Outside Agency, and Voicians. While each and every single one of the remixes were absolutely fantastic, I would like to point out my favorite which is Darksiderz hardcore remix of 'Override'. Completely redoing the song, this artist went above and beyond to decimate the song with deep bass drops that will completely make you want to stomp all over a dancefloor. 

With all this said, I think that Zardonic is a very passionate, very enthusiastic man when it comes to his project. He's always pushing forward and isn't afraid to say what's on his mind no matter the case. He's sure to cater to a multiple array of music fans, and I dare say that a good majority of industrial fans such as yourselves will find his tunes more than accessible. Clashing electronics and metal seldom ever sounds so good then on "Antihero", and Zardonic should be praised for being able to fuse both his genre passions into one wholesome product.  Sep 20 2015

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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