Detour to Nowhere Industrial, Dark Ambient World of Metal and Rust World of Metal and Rust has seen the light of day previously on the site, however, in the prior examination of Songs For Prisoners, I found that most of the songs became quite stale after a minute or so of listening to them. And, released in January with much better titles and seeming to still aspire to a certain level of creative abandonment, this man is back with Detour to Nowhere. Exhibition of Deformity starts us off with a slow and other worldly sound; it belongs in a horror movie and I will stick with that. Though, already, I can see how an interesting sound just turns into fruitless repetition as this song moved on. Quite quickly, the second song and title track seemed to fix that right up. With a nice punch with some noise and a piano playing above a nice little bell-like sound and ambience, the first two minutes of Detour to Nowhere was great. It faded away after a time and went into some decent dark ambient territory. What I didn't like about it was the fact that the dark ambient tone would play, and then stop, and then loop back around to where it began. It was annoying and a bit painful to listen to. However, the effects over it helped push that worry out of my head. Tortured Echoes of the Mind also played with the effect of stop, loop, back to where it began. And I did not like that at all; it was much too apparent that a looping effect was in place, and even though the noises above it were nice, this trick did not work twice. Mental Labyrinth continued that whole looping trend and just really bugged me in every sense of the word. This was not a song worth listening to. Asphalt Serenade had the same problem once more, and you really just shouldn't bother your time on this one. As I progress further into this album, it's as if the songs have a great starting point to them, something that can really wet your lips. However, due to this process of repetition, the songs have no bulk to them, no progression, nothing to really make you want to move forward.Everything repeats. The rest of the songs hold up to this standard, and to go through each and every single one of them would be pointless, as I would say the same thing over and over again. Loop. Repeat. Loop. Repeat. It's quite a bother to go through this entire album. And, you know, even when the songs themselves change up, say from noisey to dark ambient, they still manage to repeat in two different, three minute sections. And, the real sad thing is that the noises presented within the songs aren't half bad at all; in fact, I caught myself enjoying them a few times. But, hearing them on end for two to three minutes at a time is just a pain. If the artist really wants to move forward, then he'll scrap this method of song making for one that's more unique, creative, and not quite as boring as this. 150
Brutal Resonance

World of Metal and Rust - Detour to Nowhere

2.5
"Worthless"
N/A
Electroracle
Released off label 2014
World of Metal and Rust has seen the light of day previously on the site, however, in the prior examination of Songs For Prisoners, I found that most of the songs became quite stale after a minute or so of listening to them. And, released in January with much better titles and seeming to still aspire to a certain level of creative abandonment, this man is back with Detour to Nowhere.

Exhibition of Deformity starts us off with a slow and other worldly sound; it belongs in a horror movie and I will stick with that. Though, already, I can see how an interesting sound just turns into fruitless repetition as this song moved on.

Quite quickly, the second song and title track seemed to fix that right up. With a nice punch with some noise and a piano playing above a nice little bell-like sound and ambience, the first two minutes of Detour to Nowhere was great. It faded away after a time and went into some decent dark ambient territory. What I didn't like about it was the fact that the dark ambient tone would play, and then stop, and then loop back around to where it began. It was annoying and a bit painful to listen to. However, the effects over it helped push that worry out of my head.

Tortured Echoes of the Mind also played with the effect of stop, loop, back to where it began. And I did not like that at all; it was much too apparent that a looping effect was in place, and even though the noises above it were nice, this trick did not work twice.

Mental Labyrinth continued that whole looping trend and just really bugged me in every sense of the word. This was not a song worth listening to. Asphalt Serenade had the same problem once more, and you really just shouldn't bother your time on this one.

As I progress further into this album, it's as if the songs have a great starting point to them, something that can really wet your lips. However, due to this process of repetition, the songs have no bulk to them, no progression, nothing to really make you want to move forward.Everything repeats.

The rest of the songs hold up to this standard, and to go through each and every single one of them would be pointless, as I would say the same thing over and over again. Loop. Repeat. Loop. Repeat. It's quite a bother to go through this entire album.

And, you know, even when the songs themselves change up, say from noisey to dark ambient, they still manage to repeat in two different, three minute sections. And, the real sad thing is that the noises presented within the songs aren't half bad at all; in fact, I caught myself enjoying them a few times. But, hearing them on end for two to three minutes at a time is just a pain. If the artist really wants to move forward, then he'll scrap this method of song making for one that's more unique, creative, and not quite as boring as this. Jul 03 2014

Off label

Official release released by the artist themselves without the backing of a label.

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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