Simulation Dark Ambient, Drone Tineidae Editor's Note: Though the artist is labeled as Tineidae, this is indeed a collaboration album between Tineidae and Drifting in Silence. Our website's coding does not allow us to input more than one artist on a release. This is something we are hoping to fix in a future update. This review was commissioned through Ko-fi. However, it bears no weight on the score or decision. All reviews are written from an unbiased standpoint. A sweeping array of digital thoughts and philosophies, of arguments and controlled discussion is the best way to describe the ever-shifting analogue soundscapes of Drifting in Silence and Tineidae’s collaborative effort “Simulation”. Welcoming the glitch with open arms, the two ambient and experimental masters embrace what so many others have attempted to craft in the past such as Vangelis, Coil, and Aphex Twin. This concept album asks the question: What if life was a simulation? What if all reality was nothing more than a simulation? From this text that I type to the thoughts in my head; what if it was all artificial? Seeking out the answers that movies such as The Matrix had asked in the past with the philosophical presence of Blade Runner coming to mind, “Simulation” is a gorgeous piece of work that could easily decorate the sandbox world of any of the Deus Ex games or be used in a meditative trance.  ‘Reality’ opens the album up with soft, sweeping synths. While the approach may feel similar to many other ambient artists, neither Tineidae nor Drifting in Silence rely on a singular synth to keep up interest. Weaving in soft lines – like ocean waves transformed into light synths – does ‘Reality’ gently glide across your ears. For a little more than three minutes does this piece put you into a trance before adding in gorgeous and lush percussion and bass elements. Not necessarily transforming it into a dance track, but giving a heavier, cinematic vibe as if you’re experiencing a climactic moment in a film. This has got to be one of the best opening tracks I’ve ever heard in an ambient album, and it’s one that keeps me coming back and back again to “Simulation”. Simulation by Drifting In Silence & Tineidae‘Sonorous’ does begin off a bit rough in the sense that what Drifting in Silence and Tineidae propose during the opening one-minute and forty-seconds is very similar to what many other ambient / experimental artists' conduct. Dense layers and a cavernous sound without much more to the structure. It’s a commonplace routine that I did not think either artist would fall into. Nonetheless, that annoyance simply fell apart as soon as the next part of the song came in. Adding in rainfall and IDM elements, I was immediately put back into a peaceful and chill groove. The elements from the beginning of the track were used as background accents but never became the sole focus of the song again aside the closing minute. And that minute did drag on for a bit too long, slowly fading the synth line to nothingness. If Drifting in Silence and Tineidae cut some time off both the beginning and end of the song, this would be as much a masterpiece as the first.‘Simulation, Pt. 1’ comes in next. Rumbling IDM and glitch elements break apart the surface of reality as sad sounding synths play in the background. It honestly reminds me of a ton of nanobots eating away at an artificial dome, revealing the truth of the world to everyone else on the outside. This song is easily transformed from another ambient piece to something that reminds me of an electro-industrial ballad. ‘Dark Matter’ is presented in similar vein of ‘Sonorous’ – a dark ambient soundscape takes control of the beginning section. However, it isn’t overextended and gives way around forty-seconds into the song to rumbling, almost industrial techno like beats. Again, Drifting in Silence and Tineidae showcase their knack of introducing hardened and glitchy industrial beats to soft felt synths. It tells a story, to me, of both hope for the future and the destruction of what one thought was real. And it’s gorgeous. Sweeping synths and the gusts of a desert gently brought me into ‘Artifact’. All the while, Drifting in Silence and Tineidae slowly bring in outside electronic trickles. It reminds me of a deserted facility lying in the middle of ancient ruins where computers and machinery still showcase the smallest signs of life. And the protagonist, whoever they may be, has reawakened the wondrous technology that lurked beneath. While ‘Inflaton’ had me interested in the beginning with the oddball synths and rumbling bass that accompanied them, the song didn’t necessarily hit the epic scope I was introduced to on previous songs. The multi-layered, dragged-out ambient synths are stereotypical of the genre and the electronics that come with it cannot compete. While it isn’t a bad song, it doesn’t stand out among the crowd either. As if exploring the boundaries of space does ‘In This Life’ transport me to the stars above. The trickle of electronic notes invite me into deep space as the synths pinging remind me of laser beams shooting through the atmosphere. Synth walls decorate the latter half of the song; they aren’t suffocating but give me extraterrestrial vibes. ‘Render in the Sky’ once again bring me back down to Earth. As if looking up from a rainy forest and into the sky can I see a tear in the fabric of the universe; of something that isn’t meant to be. Whirling electronics, the sounds of birds chirping give dazzling sounds. ‘Simulation, Pt.2’ brings in a raucous of IDM and glitchy beats once again. There’s less of a focus this time around on spatial ambiance and more on hardened industrial beats – perhaps representing the simulation’s decline and failure. It’s not until around the four-minute mark does the heated song play out with sad-sounding ambient synths that eventually lead me to the end of the song. Unfortunately, there’s not much to say about the final two songs on “Simulation”. Both ‘Nature of Existence’ and ‘Within the Abstract’ are well produced and the quality is high, but the craftsmanship is on the low end. Textures aren’t there and whatever is sound rather standard for the genre. While I can see this being used as background music for cinema or video games, as standalone pieces they are quite boring. Even with the couple of pieces I found not to my liking on “Simulation”, this is still a must-listen to album of the year if you’re even remotely interested in ambient, IDM, or glitch music. Songs such as ‘Reality’ and ‘Dark Matter’ are wonderful highlights of the album. If I were reviewing these songs on their own, I’d likely give them a nine or higher. That being said, “Simulation” is weighed down by a couple of songs that, while not terrible, aren’t up to par with that quality. And there’s quite a few of them including ‘Inflaton’, ‘Nature of Existence’, ‘Within the Abstract, and to an extent ‘Sonorous’. It’s a matter of quality and quantity, and the first three of the four aforementioned songs could have easily been on the cutting room floor. Nonetheless, when “Simulation” hits, it hits hard, and I found myself in a completely chill zone multiple times throughout the album. Seven-and-a-half out of ten.  450
Brutal Resonance

Tineidae - Simulation

7.5
"Good"
Released 2022 by Labile Records Inc.
Editor's Note: Though the artist is labeled as Tineidae, this is indeed a collaboration album between Tineidae and Drifting in Silence. Our website's coding does not allow us to input more than one artist on a release. This is something we are hoping to fix in a future update. 

This review was commissioned through Ko-fi. However, it bears no weight on the score or decision. All reviews are written from an unbiased standpoint. 

A sweeping array of digital thoughts and philosophies, of arguments and controlled discussion is the best way to describe the ever-shifting analogue soundscapes of Drifting in Silence and Tineidae’s collaborative effort “Simulation”. Welcoming the glitch with open arms, the two ambient and experimental masters embrace what so many others have attempted to craft in the past such as Vangelis, Coil, and Aphex Twin. This concept album asks the question: What if life was a simulation? What if all reality was nothing more than a simulation? From this text that I type to the thoughts in my head; what if it was all artificial? Seeking out the answers that movies such as The Matrix had asked in the past with the philosophical presence of Blade Runner coming to mind, “Simulation” is a gorgeous piece of work that could easily decorate the sandbox world of any of the Deus Ex games or be used in a meditative trance. 

 ‘Reality’ opens the album up with soft, sweeping synths. While the approach may feel similar to many other ambient artists, neither Tineidae nor Drifting in Silence rely on a singular synth to keep up interest. Weaving in soft lines – like ocean waves transformed into light synths – does ‘Reality’ gently glide across your ears. For a little more than three minutes does this piece put you into a trance before adding in gorgeous and lush percussion and bass elements. Not necessarily transforming it into a dance track, but giving a heavier, cinematic vibe as if you’re experiencing a climactic moment in a film. This has got to be one of the best opening tracks I’ve ever heard in an ambient album, and it’s one that keeps me coming back and back again to “Simulation”. 


‘Sonorous’ does begin off a bit rough in the sense that what Drifting in Silence and Tineidae propose during the opening one-minute and forty-seconds is very similar to what many other ambient / experimental artists' conduct. Dense layers and a cavernous sound without much more to the structure. It’s a commonplace routine that I did not think either artist would fall into. Nonetheless, that annoyance simply fell apart as soon as the next part of the song came in. Adding in rainfall and IDM elements, I was immediately put back into a peaceful and chill groove. The elements from the beginning of the track were used as background accents but never became the sole focus of the song again aside the closing minute. And that minute did drag on for a bit too long, slowly fading the synth line to nothingness. If Drifting in Silence and Tineidae cut some time off both the beginning and end of the song, this would be as much a masterpiece as the first.

‘Simulation, Pt. 1’ comes in next. Rumbling IDM and glitch elements break apart the surface of reality as sad sounding synths play in the background. It honestly reminds me of a ton of nanobots eating away at an artificial dome, revealing the truth of the world to everyone else on the outside. This song is easily transformed from another ambient piece to something that reminds me of an electro-industrial ballad. ‘Dark Matter’ is presented in similar vein of ‘Sonorous’ – a dark ambient soundscape takes control of the beginning section. However, it isn’t overextended and gives way around forty-seconds into the song to rumbling, almost industrial techno like beats. Again, Drifting in Silence and Tineidae showcase their knack of introducing hardened and glitchy industrial beats to soft felt synths. It tells a story, to me, of both hope for the future and the destruction of what one thought was real. And it’s gorgeous. 

Sweeping synths and the gusts of a desert gently brought me into ‘Artifact’. All the while, Drifting in Silence and Tineidae slowly bring in outside electronic trickles. It reminds me of a deserted facility lying in the middle of ancient ruins where computers and machinery still showcase the smallest signs of life. And the protagonist, whoever they may be, has reawakened the wondrous technology that lurked beneath. While ‘Inflaton’ had me interested in the beginning with the oddball synths and rumbling bass that accompanied them, the song didn’t necessarily hit the epic scope I was introduced to on previous songs. The multi-layered, dragged-out ambient synths are stereotypical of the genre and the electronics that come with it cannot compete. While it isn’t a bad song, it doesn’t stand out among the crowd either. 

As if exploring the boundaries of space does ‘In This Life’ transport me to the stars above. The trickle of electronic notes invite me into deep space as the synths pinging remind me of laser beams shooting through the atmosphere. Synth walls decorate the latter half of the song; they aren’t suffocating but give me extraterrestrial vibes. ‘Render in the Sky’ once again bring me back down to Earth. As if looking up from a rainy forest and into the sky can I see a tear in the fabric of the universe; of something that isn’t meant to be. Whirling electronics, the sounds of birds chirping give dazzling sounds. 

‘Simulation, Pt.2’ brings in a raucous of IDM and glitchy beats once again. There’s less of a focus this time around on spatial ambiance and more on hardened industrial beats – perhaps representing the simulation’s decline and failure. It’s not until around the four-minute mark does the heated song play out with sad-sounding ambient synths that eventually lead me to the end of the song. Unfortunately, there’s not much to say about the final two songs on “Simulation”. Both ‘Nature of Existence’ and ‘Within the Abstract’ are well produced and the quality is high, but the craftsmanship is on the low end. Textures aren’t there and whatever is sound rather standard for the genre. While I can see this being used as background music for cinema or video games, as standalone pieces they are quite boring. 

Even with the couple of pieces I found not to my liking on “Simulation”, this is still a must-listen to album of the year if you’re even remotely interested in ambient, IDM, or glitch music. Songs such as ‘Reality’ and ‘Dark Matter’ are wonderful highlights of the album. If I were reviewing these songs on their own, I’d likely give them a nine or higher. That being said, “Simulation” is weighed down by a couple of songs that, while not terrible, aren’t up to par with that quality. And there’s quite a few of them including ‘Inflaton’, ‘Nature of Existence’, ‘Within the Abstract, and to an extent ‘Sonorous’. It’s a matter of quality and quantity, and the first three of the four aforementioned songs could have easily been on the cutting room floor. Nonetheless, when “Simulation” hits, it hits hard, and I found myself in a completely chill zone multiple times throughout the album. Seven-and-a-half out of ten. 
Jul 26 2022

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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