Corrosive Audio TBM, Rhythmic Noise Terrorkode The delay between the debut EP 'Whores & Motherfuckers' from this Colombian duo, and 'Sew My Eyes' was lengthy and frustrating. Admittedly, I had written off Terrorkode as being a typical act with little activity and potential. Then 'Sew My Eyes' hit, which happened to feature Javi from Terrolokaust. The track itself is astutely unusual in sound, and is quite frankly demented. It works so well, and with Javi's distinctive vocals starting off the EP with the battle cry of "SEWWWWW MYYY EYEEESSS", one thing was clear : Terrorkode had finally landed. With a digipak that is designed to look like a video game; featuring over a dozen clever little quirks and ideas, including an 'achievement unlocked' notification in the panel, various references to the song titles and label where the usual certification would be, and a credit sheet that looks like Street Fighter II, Terrorkode has hit the market where it is most relevant, and it's immensely original. The album opens with 'Pain' - one of the best tracks the act have put out to date, and it rivals Soman, S.A.M, Modulate, and anyone else from that vein of Industrial. 'Motherfuckers', re-released from the earlier EP, is as addictive as Skyrim, and only narrowly beat the latter to the fight for my time this evening. Sampling runs through this release like Oxygen in the lungs, and with almost no error, it is subtle and appropriate. 'Forward and Rewind' starts with one of my favourite samples in recent releases, and I cannot stop myself thinking that this digipak would go so well with any Xbox 360 gamer. Sacro and Neural have considered both visual and audio aesthetic as a means of promotion, and although most serious acts make this distinction, I'm yet to see anyone doing what these two are doing - when I unwrapped the digipak, I just loved everything I read, and couldn't wait to spin the disc. There are three other main stand outs to this CD - 'Kubrick was Here' - a track which breaks the taboo of sampling Full Metal Jacket, and actually gets away with it. 'War' is one of a very small number of tracks to feature vocals, and the guest vocals are uncredited (and will remain so), however the performer in question is deeply important to the Dark Electro scene, and has a vocal style that is very, very identifiable. What finally makes this release so amazing is the inclusion of two hidden, cryptically revealed 'secret tracks'. There's a total of 18 tracks here if you include 'Napalm' and 'Ultimate Fighting Unit'. I won't reveal how to find them, but there's some serious mastery here, as most of you will never hear them unless you own the digipak, AND a Hi-Fi. They are invisible to every form of CD player, and can only be found by 'playing the game', details of which are in the digipak. Finally, the remixes literally re-do some of the tracks, and it's always fun to watch an expert play a game and best it. So we have something new, innovative, heavy, stompy, and carries enough weight to perform a fatality on piracy. Score is self-explanatory. You just lost the game. 450
Brutal Resonance

Terrorkode - Corrosive Audio

8.5
"Great"
N/A
Electroracle
Spotify
Released 2011 by DWA
The delay between the debut EP 'Whores & Motherfuckers' from this Colombian duo, and 'Sew My Eyes' was lengthy and frustrating. Admittedly, I had written off Terrorkode as being a typical act with little activity and potential.

Then 'Sew My Eyes' hit, which happened to feature Javi from Terrolokaust. The track itself is astutely unusual in sound, and is quite frankly demented. It works so well, and with Javi's distinctive vocals starting off the EP with the battle cry of "SEWWWWW MYYY EYEEESSS", one thing was clear :
Terrorkode had finally landed.

With a digipak that is designed to look like a video game; featuring over a dozen clever little quirks and ideas, including an 'achievement unlocked' notification in the panel, various references to the song titles and label where the usual certification would be, and a credit sheet that looks like Street Fighter II, Terrorkode has hit the market where it is most relevant, and it's immensely original.

The album opens with 'Pain' - one of the best tracks the act have put out to date, and it rivals Soman, S.A.M, Modulate, and anyone else from that vein of Industrial.
'Motherfuckers', re-released from the earlier EP, is as addictive as Skyrim, and only narrowly beat the latter to the fight for my time this evening. Sampling runs through this release like Oxygen in the lungs, and with almost no error, it is subtle and appropriate.

'Forward and Rewind' starts with one of my favourite samples in recent releases, and I cannot stop myself thinking that this digipak would go so well with any Xbox 360 gamer. Sacro and Neural have considered both visual and audio aesthetic as a means of promotion, and although most serious acts make this distinction, I'm yet to see anyone doing what these two are doing - when I unwrapped the digipak, I just loved everything I read, and couldn't wait to spin the disc.

There are three other main stand outs to this CD - 'Kubrick was Here' - a track which breaks the taboo of sampling Full Metal Jacket, and actually gets away with it.
'War' is one of a very small number of tracks to feature vocals, and the guest vocals are uncredited (and will remain so), however the performer in question is deeply important to the Dark Electro scene, and has a vocal style that is very, very identifiable.

What finally makes this release so amazing is the inclusion of two hidden, cryptically revealed 'secret tracks'. There's a total of 18 tracks here if you include 'Napalm' and 'Ultimate Fighting Unit'. I won't reveal how to find them, but there's some serious mastery here, as most of you will never hear them unless you own the digipak, AND a Hi-Fi.
They are invisible to every form of CD player, and can only be found by 'playing the game', details of which are in the digipak.

Finally, the remixes literally re-do some of the tracks, and it's always fun to watch an expert play a game and best it.
So we have something new, innovative, heavy, stompy, and carries enough weight to perform a fatality on piracy.

Score is self-explanatory.
You just lost the game.
Nov 16 2011

Nick Quarm

info@brutalresonance.com
Writer and contributor on Brutal Resonance

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