What's Left Unsaid Industrial, Goth Sister Sarin Goth, industrial, and synthwave-influenced project Sister Sarin got its start in November of 2019 when Hemlock Wargrave was on tour drumming for Steven Archer's solo project Stoneburner. Keeping alive the DIY tradition of the industrial scene, Wargrave used their laptop, cheap earbuds, and an inverter to keep their laptop alive. That alongside the creation of the project's first single 'Tripwire' (which made its debut on "What's Left Unsaid") was how Sister Sarin got its start. The name came from mashing Skinny Puppy's song 'VX Gas Attack' alongside the general moodiness and feel of The Sisters of Mercy. The goth and industrial hybrid, though now not as noticeable as it once was on the Electronic Saviors' exclusive song 'Do Not Stand At My Grave and Weep', helped shape Sister Sarin into the project that it currently stands to be. In either case, Sister Sarin has two EPs, two singles, and one double to their name as of this date with "What's Left Unsaid" being the focus. Starting off with the cover art for the single is a must; a painting of a person with long, straggled dark hair gazes endlessly at the void. Piercing blue eyes drew my attention at first while the needle next to the character's left shoulder created questions of addiction and substance abuse. Over this, like a silhouette or as if we're looking at this character through a window, are what appears to be tree branches. I'm not sure what the themes of the album are, but I assume that some can be taken from this image alone. As always, and I do like to state this with every review, talking about the cover art never effects the outcome of the score. It's just fun for me to explore.What's Left Unsaid by Sister SarinI found myself a bit polarized when it came to the EP "What's Left Unsaid". The five-track release begins off in wonderful fashion with 'Lost Tape'. As if it were the introduction to some cosmic, cinematic journey, ominous synths a la John Carpenter begin off the song before a steadier, more hopeful tone takes place. It is simply a fascinating synth-work worthy of praise; if I were judging this song alone, I would rate it high. 'Tripwire' begins with a quote from Twin Peaks' character Dale Cooper stating, "Harry, I have no idea where this will lead us, but I have a definite feeling it will be a place both wonderful and strange." And, I can't praise this song enough. It's an emotional ballad that made me well up inside during the one-minute and forty-second soft instrumental prose that preceded an industrial-tinged drop. It is like a series of bewilderment was transformed into a calamity of understanding; one that I was unsure was happy or sad. The final song on the album 'Lament' is another gorgeous work. It's a timeless piece centered around piano keys. Again, the sense of mystery and discovery is effortlessly intertwined in the otherworldly music that I sat through. Between 'Lament', 'Lost Tape', and 'Tripwire', I sat through three of the most beautiful pieces I listened to in 2020. However I may praise the three previous songs, I was relatively upset with 'Right Where It Belongs' and 'Nerve Agents'. 'Right Where It Belongs' contains a very raw sound with static meshes patchworked in. Piano work plays through but nothing ever really seems to fit with one another. It sounds like each piece of music in this song is attempting to do something different without coinciding with one another and turns into a mess. I wasn't a huge fan of the vocals on this song either as they simply were unappealing and just contributed to the overall wreck of 'Right Where It Belongs'. This brings me to 'Nerve Agents'. In comparison to 'Lost Tape', 'Tripwire', and Lament', this song fits in thematically. It has an electro-industrial influence (as stated above, Sister Sarin is inspired by Skinny Puppy) and the rhythm and beats are well implemented. However, it sounds so raw and unproduced in comparison to the previous songs. It feels as if it is a demo rather than a finished product. It's not terrible, but I don't think the quality of this song matches the flawless talent shown on the other trio of songs. So, while the EP is polarizing and I do have my complaints, I can't help but recommend Sister Sarin's debut EP to everyone I come across. Yes, 'Right Where It Belongs' is completely skippable to me and 'Nerve Agents' isn't my favorite track out of the bunch, but what 'Lost Tape', 'Tripwire', and 'Lament' do makes up for the negative feedback. The future of Sister Sarin is looking bright, as well. They have signed to Wolfcore Records and have subsequently released a single piano concerto 'Feuer und Leidenschaft'; a rougher, industrial double "As The Sky Falls", and a cover of Siouxsie and the Banshees' 'Softly'. The project has welcomed in Alex Jude (writer, vocalist, multi-instrumentalist) as part of the lineup and a tour is planned for 2022. So, I'll keep my ears out for Sister Sarin's next release; they definitely have my interest. This review was commissioned through our Ko-fi page. Feel free to check it out for review, interview, and premiere opportunities.  450
Brutal Resonance

Sister Sarin - What's Left Unsaid

7.0
"Good"
Released off label 2020
Goth, industrial, and synthwave-influenced project Sister Sarin got its start in November of 2019 when Hemlock Wargrave was on tour drumming for Steven Archer's solo project Stoneburner. Keeping alive the DIY tradition of the industrial scene, Wargrave used their laptop, cheap earbuds, and an inverter to keep their laptop alive. That alongside the creation of the project's first single 'Tripwire' (which made its debut on "What's Left Unsaid") was how Sister Sarin got its start. The name came from mashing Skinny Puppy's song 'VX Gas Attack' alongside the general moodiness and feel of The Sisters of Mercy. The goth and industrial hybrid, though now not as noticeable as it once was on the Electronic Saviors' exclusive song 'Do Not Stand At My Grave and Weep', helped shape Sister Sarin into the project that it currently stands to be. 

In either case, Sister Sarin has two EPs, two singles, and one double to their name as of this date with "What's Left Unsaid" being the focus. Starting off with the cover art for the single is a must; a painting of a person with long, straggled dark hair gazes endlessly at the void. Piercing blue eyes drew my attention at first while the needle next to the character's left shoulder created questions of addiction and substance abuse. Over this, like a silhouette or as if we're looking at this character through a window, are what appears to be tree branches. I'm not sure what the themes of the album are, but I assume that some can be taken from this image alone. As always, and I do like to state this with every review, talking about the cover art never effects the outcome of the score. It's just fun for me to explore.



I found myself a bit polarized when it came to the EP "What's Left Unsaid". The five-track release begins off in wonderful fashion with 'Lost Tape'. As if it were the introduction to some cosmic, cinematic journey, ominous synths a la John Carpenter begin off the song before a steadier, more hopeful tone takes place. It is simply a fascinating synth-work worthy of praise; if I were judging this song alone, I would rate it high.

'Tripwire' begins with a quote from Twin Peaks' character Dale Cooper stating, "Harry, I have no idea where this will lead us, but I have a definite feeling it will be a place both wonderful and strange." And, I can't praise this song enough. It's an emotional ballad that made me well up inside during the one-minute and forty-second soft instrumental prose that preceded an industrial-tinged drop. It is like a series of bewilderment was transformed into a calamity of understanding; one that I was unsure was happy or sad. 

The final song on the album 'Lament' is another gorgeous work. It's a timeless piece centered around piano keys. Again, the sense of mystery and discovery is effortlessly intertwined in the otherworldly music that I sat through. Between 'Lament', 'Lost Tape', and 'Tripwire', I sat through three of the most beautiful pieces I listened to in 2020. 

However I may praise the three previous songs, I was relatively upset with 'Right Where It Belongs' and 'Nerve Agents'. 'Right Where It Belongs' contains a very raw sound with static meshes patchworked in. Piano work plays through but nothing ever really seems to fit with one another. It sounds like each piece of music in this song is attempting to do something different without coinciding with one another and turns into a mess. I wasn't a huge fan of the vocals on this song either as they simply were unappealing and just contributed to the overall wreck of 'Right Where It Belongs'. 

This brings me to 'Nerve Agents'. In comparison to 'Lost Tape', 'Tripwire', and Lament', this song fits in thematically. It has an electro-industrial influence (as stated above, Sister Sarin is inspired by Skinny Puppy) and the rhythm and beats are well implemented. However, it sounds so raw and unproduced in comparison to the previous songs. It feels as if it is a demo rather than a finished product. It's not terrible, but I don't think the quality of this song matches the flawless talent shown on the other trio of songs. 

So, while the EP is polarizing and I do have my complaints, I can't help but recommend Sister Sarin's debut EP to everyone I come across. Yes, 'Right Where It Belongs' is completely skippable to me and 'Nerve Agents' isn't my favorite track out of the bunch, but what 'Lost Tape', 'Tripwire', and 'Lament' do makes up for the negative feedback. 

The future of Sister Sarin is looking bright, as well. They have signed to Wolfcore Records and have subsequently released a single piano concerto 'Feuer und Leidenschaft'; a rougher, industrial double "As The Sky Falls", and a cover of Siouxsie and the Banshees' 'Softly'. The project has welcomed in Alex Jude (writer, vocalist, multi-instrumentalist) as part of the lineup and a tour is planned for 2022. So, I'll keep my ears out for Sister Sarin's next release; they definitely have my interest. 

This review was commissioned through our Ko-fi page. Feel free to check it out for review, interview, and premiere opportunities. 
Dec 27 2020

Off label

Official release released by the artist themselves without the backing of a label.

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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