Revelate Dark Electro, Harsh EBM Sin D.N.A Almost a year on from the debut E.P, 'Afterlife', Texan duo SIN D.N.A (Or Sin DNA if you like) are out to prove that they're not one hit wonders, or more importantly, not likely to suffer 'second release' syndrome. 'Afterlife' rewrote the genre, with its disciplined synth, crisp production, and arguably harshest vocals out there - it's a personal favourite, and everything on it is performed with finesse and ability. To release a full length a year later is risky, but if I know Sin DNA, it's a risk worth taking. 'Revelate' interestingly, was the name of an earlier planned album, way before the group were a glimmer in DWA's eye. For reasons unknown, it never happened, but I recall hearing five tracks from it on Myspace - those five (Dying World, Doomsday Requiem, Broken Fate, Time Passed, Machine Devil) are on here - radically different, heavily rewritten, but possessing the same original skeleton. It's moments like this that really imprint on the evolution of a band, and believe me when I say that Sin DNA have turned from a glowing ember into a powerful ball of burning Thermite. "Dying World" is the first track on the debut full-length - I'm going out on a limb and saying that it's more refined than 'Afterlife' was - it's deeply involved, there's a lot more in the mix, and the ambient sounds that play in the background reflect the songs theme - something I always look for in music. Mario's brutal vocals have gone from being distorted and oddly coherent to even more distorted and coherent - I don't quite know how he does it, but as 'Harsh EBM' bands go, Sin DNA are one of the harshest, yet everything seems more melodic and comprehensible. Following it is "Reverence In Punishment" - the typically softer, slower-to-quicken track. It's a favourite among the catalogue, with great melodies, and importantly, the track has the right breakdowns, bridges and changes to really enforce the vocals. I find when vocals are performed in a manner that's difficult for newcomers to warm to, the background synth has to really work overtime - this ones doing 24 hours a day. After the halfway point, it breaks down to a melodic, trance like section (a common theme on this record) which could be Futurepop, if it wasn't infused with so many darker influences. "Hate is the Law" and 'Conquest and Defeat' are firm favourites already, the former being the most remixed track on here, and most entertaining for the dancefloor. There's also the worthy 'Up Evil' - probably the most violent sounding track on here, with an unusually addictive intro. My second favourite track on 'Revelate', and one I urge you all to at least check out via the dwa-digital bandcamp page. Excluding the older tracks that I mentioned earlier (all of which sit closer to 'Afterlife' then they do 'Revelate' (but each being truly excellent), there's the more traditional "Son Of Perdition" which utilizes some of the most melodic programming on the disc, "Thorns For Misery" which launches into an insane breakdown around 2:30, before finally getting in a seriously face-melting bass drop, before returning to normal, and "Become Chaos" which seems to be more of a demand than an invitation. The album closes with Die Sektor and Mexican Act Kriminal Minds remixing "Hate is the Law". "Up Evil" gets a remix by Detroit Diesel but I strongly prefer the offerings either side of it. Sin DNA have firmly cemented their own sound and feel within the genre, and it's as cold and hateful as anything else in Harsh EBM. The difference is that these are one of those acts you only get one of in every 200 that are spawned. Cherish, embrace and enjoy every second these guys are in business. I've never heard anything like it, at least not this early in. 550
Brutal Resonance

Sin D.N.A - Revelate

Almost a year on from the debut E.P, 'Afterlife', Texan duo SIN D.N.A (Or Sin DNA if you like) are out to prove that they're not one hit wonders, or more importantly, not likely to suffer 'second release' syndrome.

'Afterlife' rewrote the genre, with its disciplined synth, crisp production, and arguably harshest vocals out there - it's a personal favourite, and everything on it is performed with finesse and ability. To release a full length a year later is risky, but if I know Sin DNA, it's a risk worth taking.

'Revelate' interestingly, was the name of an earlier planned album, way before the group were a glimmer in DWA's eye. For reasons unknown, it never happened, but I recall hearing five tracks from it on Myspace - those five (Dying World, Doomsday Requiem, Broken Fate, Time Passed, Machine Devil) are on here - radically different, heavily rewritten, but possessing the same original skeleton. It's moments like this that really imprint on the evolution of a band, and believe me when I say that Sin DNA have turned from a glowing ember into a powerful ball of burning Thermite.

"Dying World" is the first track on the debut full-length - I'm going out on a limb and saying that it's more refined than 'Afterlife' was - it's deeply involved, there's a lot more in the mix, and the ambient sounds that play in the background reflect the songs theme - something I always look for in music. Mario's brutal vocals have gone from being distorted and oddly coherent to even more distorted and coherent - I don't quite know how he does it, but as 'Harsh EBM' bands go, Sin DNA are one of the harshest, yet everything seems more melodic and comprehensible.

Following it is "Reverence In Punishment" - the typically softer, slower-to-quicken track. It's a favourite among the catalogue, with great melodies, and importantly, the track has the right breakdowns, bridges and changes to really enforce the vocals. I find when vocals are performed in a manner that's difficult for newcomers to warm to, the background synth has to really work overtime - this ones doing 24 hours a day. After the halfway point, it breaks down to a melodic, trance like section (a common theme on this record) which could be Futurepop, if it wasn't infused with so many darker influences.

"Hate is the Law" and 'Conquest and Defeat' are firm favourites already, the former being the most remixed track on here, and most entertaining for the dancefloor.

There's also the worthy 'Up Evil' - probably the most violent sounding track on here, with an unusually addictive intro. My second favourite track on 'Revelate', and one I urge you all to at least check out via the dwa-digital bandcamp page.

Excluding the older tracks that I mentioned earlier (all of which sit closer to 'Afterlife' then they do 'Revelate' (but each being truly excellent), there's the more traditional "Son Of Perdition" which utilizes some of the most melodic programming on the disc, "Thorns For Misery" which launches into an insane breakdown around 2:30, before finally getting in a seriously face-melting bass drop, before returning to normal, and "Become Chaos" which seems to be more of a demand than an invitation.

The album closes with Die Sektor and Mexican Act Kriminal Minds remixing "Hate is the Law". "Up Evil" gets a remix by Detroit Diesel but I strongly prefer the offerings either side of it.

Sin DNA have firmly cemented their own sound and feel within the genre, and it's as cold and hateful as anything else in Harsh EBM. The difference is that these are one of those acts you only get one of in every 200 that are spawned. Cherish, embrace and enjoy every second these guys are in business. I've never heard anything like it, at least not this early in. Jul 04 2012

Nick Quarm

info@brutalresonance.com
Writer and contributor on Brutal Resonance

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