Netherworld Principle Synthpop, Futurepop Reali-tGlitch This review was commissioned through Ko-fi. However, it bears no weight on the score or decision. All reviews are written from an unbiased standpoint. If there was a song that Reali-tGlitch should have started the album “Netherworld Principle” off with, it should not have been the title track. This is a pretty horrendous track that does not show off any of the producer’s skills. His voice does not carry a tune and fails to match the beat; it sounds like a broken monologue against the bouncy electronic backbeat. The synth-based beat isn’t anything much to write home about, either. An extremely repetitive sounding track that’s not as tight in quality as it could have been with many moments sounding muddy and blended together. ‘Coat Hanger Mammoths’ somewhat amends what I heard in the previous track. Reali-tGlitch opts in for a spoken word lyrical delivery with light tones. I imagine that the effects that he placed on his vocals help hide his lack of talent, but then again so does much of the rest of the electronic scene. It’s a good choice is what I’m trying to get at; doesn’t matter what’s used to cover up so long as it sounds good within the finished product. While production still doesn’t hit top notch quality, the slowed beat and meticulously placed beats made me vibe in a far off planet. Which is what I think Reali-tGlitch is aiming for on “Netherworld Principle”. Netherworld Principle by Reali-tGlitchComing in as the third track is ‘Appetite For Apathy’. A slow crawling, synth laden beat brings us into the midst of the track. Cut-up, trance like notes lead us into the lyrics. Reali-tGlitch goes back to using his natural voice and, once again, it doesn’t sound too great. Flat, sounding bored – which I guess works with the theme of the song but doesn’t necessarily excite me as a listener. It rather made me want to switch the song off and move on. ‘Falsities’ is Reali-tGlitch’s stab at making an 80s, space-y synthpop club track. It’s a fun dive into space-disco beats, but is a bit basic. A standard four-on-the-floor beat with a few epic synths isn’t enough to stand out in the crowd, though I will admit it is a catchy song. ‘Pure Rage’ comes in the middle of the album. Despite the title of the song, the rhythm is rather melancholic with a rapid lyrical delivery. I was kinda impressed around the one-minute and thirty-seven second mark where Reali-tGlitch shows off his rap skills. Spitting lyrics in rhythm with slight digital effects, it wasn’t bad. Not the best, but probably better than what I’ve heard on the rest of the album so far. ‘Heathen Tastes’ I couldn’t get into at all; I feel as if this is an unfinished product with a demo like beat. Next. ‘ I think that ‘Ghost Town’ is Reali-tGlitch at his best – musically speaking, not vocally. I feel as if the product is deep, fulfilling. It’s not overstuffed with too many beats that Reali-tGlitch isn’t able to control. It’s a simple premise with a slow beat, and some 8-bit influences that got me bobbing my head. I felt much the same for ‘Glitched On The Inside’, though to a lesser degree. They’re both very clean songs that show less is sometimes more. ‘Kill Your Demons’ is the last track on the album. Reali-tGlitch gives a last stand – again, his voice isn’t appealing. But the beat isn’t terrible, warping from bouncy club beats to atmospheric stop and go moments. Nothing revolutionary or breaking, but enough to make me appreciate the song. While I wouldn’t say that “Netherworld Principle” was difficult to get through, I could say that it was boring at times, sloppy at others, and promising all in the same bout. Reali-tGlitch knows how to make a song, that’s for sure, but there’s not a song on here that I would rate higher than a 6 on its own. One of the major issues that stems from this album is Reali-tGlitch’s voice; most of the time Reali-tGlitch can’t flow with his own song, and either sounds bored or out of tune. There are sparse moments where he does show he can do it, but even then it’s bordering mediocrity. Reali-tGlitch is on the right path, but he needs to learn more, and potentially find a vocalist for his project. Five out of ten.  350
Brutal Resonance

Reali-tGlitch - Netherworld Principle

5.0
"Mediocre"
Released off label 2022
This review was commissioned through Ko-fi. However, it bears no weight on the score or decision. All reviews are written from an unbiased standpoint. 

If there was a song that Reali-tGlitch should have started the album “Netherworld Principle” off with, it should not have been the title track. This is a pretty horrendous track that does not show off any of the producer’s skills. His voice does not carry a tune and fails to match the beat; it sounds like a broken monologue against the bouncy electronic backbeat. The synth-based beat isn’t anything much to write home about, either. An extremely repetitive sounding track that’s not as tight in quality as it could have been with many moments sounding muddy and blended together.

 ‘Coat Hanger Mammoths’ somewhat amends what I heard in the previous track. Reali-tGlitch opts in for a spoken word lyrical delivery with light tones. I imagine that the effects that he placed on his vocals help hide his lack of talent, but then again so does much of the rest of the electronic scene. It’s a good choice is what I’m trying to get at; doesn’t matter what’s used to cover up so long as it sounds good within the finished product. While production still doesn’t hit top notch quality, the slowed beat and meticulously placed beats made me vibe in a far off planet. Which is what I think Reali-tGlitch is aiming for on “Netherworld Principle”. 


Coming in as the third track is ‘Appetite For Apathy’. A slow crawling, synth laden beat brings us into the midst of the track. Cut-up, trance like notes lead us into the lyrics. Reali-tGlitch goes back to using his natural voice and, once again, it doesn’t sound too great. Flat, sounding bored – which I guess works with the theme of the song but doesn’t necessarily excite me as a listener. It rather made me want to switch the song off and move on. 

‘Falsities’ is Reali-tGlitch’s stab at making an 80s, space-y synthpop club track. It’s a fun dive into space-disco beats, but is a bit basic. A standard four-on-the-floor beat with a few epic synths isn’t enough to stand out in the crowd, though I will admit it is a catchy song. ‘Pure Rage’ comes in the middle of the album. Despite the title of the song, the rhythm is rather melancholic with a rapid lyrical delivery. I was kinda impressed around the one-minute and thirty-seven second mark where Reali-tGlitch shows off his rap skills. Spitting lyrics in rhythm with slight digital effects, it wasn’t bad. Not the best, but probably better than what I’ve heard on the rest of the album so far. ‘Heathen Tastes’ I couldn’t get into at all; I feel as if this is an unfinished product with a demo like beat. Next. ‘

 I think that ‘Ghost Town’ is Reali-tGlitch at his best – musically speaking, not vocally. I feel as if the product is deep, fulfilling. It’s not overstuffed with too many beats that Reali-tGlitch isn’t able to control. It’s a simple premise with a slow beat, and some 8-bit influences that got me bobbing my head. I felt much the same for ‘Glitched On The Inside’, though to a lesser degree. They’re both very clean songs that show less is sometimes more. ‘Kill Your Demons’ is the last track on the album. Reali-tGlitch gives a last stand – again, his voice isn’t appealing. But the beat isn’t terrible, warping from bouncy club beats to atmospheric stop and go moments. Nothing revolutionary or breaking, but enough to make me appreciate the song. 

While I wouldn’t say that “Netherworld Principle” was difficult to get through, I could say that it was boring at times, sloppy at others, and promising all in the same bout. Reali-tGlitch knows how to make a song, that’s for sure, but there’s not a song on here that I would rate higher than a 6 on its own. One of the major issues that stems from this album is Reali-tGlitch’s voice; most of the time Reali-tGlitch can’t flow with his own song, and either sounds bored or out of tune. There are sparse moments where he does show he can do it, but even then it’s bordering mediocrity. Reali-tGlitch is on the right path, but he needs to learn more, and potentially find a vocalist for his project. Five out of ten. 
Oct 02 2022

Off label

Official release released by the artist themselves without the backing of a label.

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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