Spit in the Eye Industrial Hip-Hop, Synth-punk Pyramid Mission This review was commissioned. However, it bears no weight on the score or decision. All reviews are written from an unbiased standpoint. Pyramid Mission is an Australian duo attempting to fuse industrial, punk, hip-hop, synths, and so much more into their repertoire. And, judging by the score above you can see that while they have a good start, they’ve got a long way to go in their journey. It’s not terrible for a debut album, but there’s a lot of issues I have with “Spit in the Eye” from lack of cohesion, shoddy vox, to a quantity versus quality situation. The good news is that the production is decent and most of the beats are well thought out, as crazy as they can become.  The album starts off with ‘TowerDOWN’ which has a wicked beat. As described above, their industrial hip-hop enthusiasm shines through as the duo takes traditional hip-hop beats and completely murders them with glitchy effects, cut-and-paste techniques, and more of a synthpunk driven attitude. The vocals range from flowing rap beats to screaming. The lyrical delivery when their vocals are clean isn’t the best, partially due to the vocals being buried in the beat. Hardly understandable to say the very least. That being said, when they’re screaming their head off does everything come together a brilliant fusion. ‘CHURCH” brings in a bit of noise influence as some kind of static feedback or something akin to a tape loop noise is added in as a filter over the music. There’s rapid fire electronic keys underneath it all, with cleaner percussion layered atop. The vocals go for more of a spoken word rhythm this time, but again they’re hard to hear over the music, rendering them useless. ‘Picture of You with the Colour Inverted’ is something I couldn’t get into. While the vocals match the bass punches within the song, the rest of the samples and everything else about it don’t. It’s a mess and not one I want to find myself wandering through again. There is a moment around the one-minute and twenty-second mark where things go quiet and they use minimal electronics to create a dope solo moment, but other than that I’m staying far away from this song. On ‘HEX’ they try to sing. Even if the voice is all digitally distorted, they tried to sing. And it was awful. This is an immediate pass. The beat itself is pretty good, though, a huge amalgamation of various electronic genres, sometimes almost passing into something you’d find in a DDR video game, but regardless I found it to be terrible. ‘[descend x disappear]’ is a rather disappointing track. Something supposed to be moody and straight out of a dark ambient template. It doesn’t fit the theme of the album and comes out of left field and simply didn’t work. ‘HELLCLAP’ is a pretty brutal song that I really appreciated. Aggressive lyrics more shouted than anything with an intentionally dragging beat that allows each and every single beat to be slammed into my veins. The song really ends around the two-minute and twelve-second mark, but Pyramid Mission keeps the song going with a sort of lo-fi mix that sounds as if you’re standing outside of a club with the door shut. And all you hear is a muffled beat and some screams. I think they should have ended the song early and cut that section out. Around this time in the album is where I started to check out mainly because I feel as if most of the tricks that Pyramid Mission had been pulling were being doubled down on. In another word, they were running out of steam and were failing to create something new and unique that kept my attention. ‘The Haze of Aquarius’ is a combination of the intermission track from earlier, low-tone vocals, and some singing; ‘1000 Pound Deadlift’ is more big beats and shouts; ‘Dancing with the Void’ is similar aside with a bit of a focus on drum’n’bass; ‘[blue flame candle]’ is ‘[descend x disappear]’ part two, and ‘PYRAMID’ seems to be a mission statement for the band. Now, throughout the review I mainly talked about lyrical delivery, and the next point I have I wanted to save up until now as I didn’t want to repeat myself on each and every single song. But their clean vocals are rather horrendous. Sure, they can rhyme one word to another in a seamless fashion, but it’s not something I want to hear on a daily basis. They almost sound nasally when they’re singing clean and it’s rather annoying. Their shouting is decent, sometimes overblown in the mix, but decent. And, look, I know they’re not trying to sound like angels, but I know they’ve put in enough effort to try not to sound like trash. But they still do. One of the songs where they don’t sound like complete ass is ‘Dysfunction (Legitimate Psychiatric Emergency)’. On this one they don’t try to hold a note, nor do they even attempt to sing, they just go crazy in a combination of industrial, punk, hip-hop, and more. Like something I could expect off a Tony Hawk soundtrack. So, the question is how do they improve? Well, for one, I would either get rid of the singing entirely, use guest vocalists, OR taking some vocal lessons because, as I stated above, their singing is horrendous. Keep the shouting, keep the anger, keep the attitude, but the singing has got to either be fixed upon or improved. The experimental nature of the album works to their advantage at times, and at others it bogs down the experience due to a chaotic mess in what should otherwise be a solid industrial hip-hop beat. The mix can be improved on some songs, where the music and bass is far outpowering the rhymes and lyrics that Pyramid Mission is seeking to push. If you have something important to address let the audience hear you. Lastly, cut songs so the album doesn’t feel like it’s doubling itself. ‘[descend x disappear] and ‘[blue flame candle]’ have no place on here, and one or two songs could have been shaved from the tracklist to make each song stand out a bit more. I don’t walk away from this album or group with malice, but disappointment in what otherwise could have been a pretty awesome debut.   350
Brutal Resonance

Pyramid Mission - Spit in the Eye

6.0
"Alright"
Released 2024 by Off Label
This review was commissioned. However, it bears no weight on the score or decision. All reviews are written from an unbiased standpoint. 

Pyramid Mission is an Australian duo attempting to fuse industrial, punk, hip-hop, synths, and so much more into their repertoire. And, judging by the score above you can see that while they have a good start, they’ve got a long way to go in their journey. It’s not terrible for a debut album, but there’s a lot of issues I have with “Spit in the Eye” from lack of cohesion, shoddy vox, to a quantity versus quality situation. The good news is that the production is decent and most of the beats are well thought out, as crazy as they can become.  

The album starts off with ‘TowerDOWN’ which has a wicked beat. As described above, their industrial hip-hop enthusiasm shines through as the duo takes traditional hip-hop beats and completely murders them with glitchy effects, cut-and-paste techniques, and more of a synthpunk driven attitude. The vocals range from flowing rap beats to screaming. The lyrical delivery when their vocals are clean isn’t the best, partially due to the vocals being buried in the beat. Hardly understandable to say the very least. That being said, when they’re screaming their head off does everything come together a brilliant fusion. 


‘CHURCH” brings in a bit of noise influence as some kind of static feedback or something akin to a tape loop noise is added in as a filter over the music. There’s rapid fire electronic keys underneath it all, with cleaner percussion layered atop. The vocals go for more of a spoken word rhythm this time, but again they’re hard to hear over the music, rendering them useless. 

‘Picture of You with the Colour Inverted’ is something I couldn’t get into. While the vocals match the bass punches within the song, the rest of the samples and everything else about it don’t. It’s a mess and not one I want to find myself wandering through again. There is a moment around the one-minute and twenty-second mark where things go quiet and they use minimal electronics to create a dope solo moment, but other than that I’m staying far away from this song. 

On ‘HEX’ they try to sing. Even if the voice is all digitally distorted, they tried to sing. And it was awful. This is an immediate pass. The beat itself is pretty good, though, a huge amalgamation of various electronic genres, sometimes almost passing into something you’d find in a DDR video game, but regardless I found it to be terrible. 

‘[descend x disappear]’ is a rather disappointing track. Something supposed to be moody and straight out of a dark ambient template. It doesn’t fit the theme of the album and comes out of left field and simply didn’t work. 

‘HELLCLAP’ is a pretty brutal song that I really appreciated. Aggressive lyrics more shouted than anything with an intentionally dragging beat that allows each and every single beat to be slammed into my veins. The song really ends around the two-minute and twelve-second mark, but Pyramid Mission keeps the song going with a sort of lo-fi mix that sounds as if you’re standing outside of a club with the door shut. And all you hear is a muffled beat and some screams. I think they should have ended the song early and cut that section out. 

Around this time in the album is where I started to check out mainly because I feel as if most of the tricks that Pyramid Mission had been pulling were being doubled down on. In another word, they were running out of steam and were failing to create something new and unique that kept my attention. ‘The Haze of Aquarius’ is a combination of the intermission track from earlier, low-tone vocals, and some singing; ‘1000 Pound Deadlift’ is more big beats and shouts; ‘Dancing with the Void’ is similar aside with a bit of a focus on drum’n’bass; ‘[blue flame candle]’ is ‘[descend x disappear]’ part two, and ‘PYRAMID’ seems to be a mission statement for the band. 

Now, throughout the review I mainly talked about lyrical delivery, and the next point I have I wanted to save up until now as I didn’t want to repeat myself on each and every single song. But their clean vocals are rather horrendous. Sure, they can rhyme one word to another in a seamless fashion, but it’s not something I want to hear on a daily basis. They almost sound nasally when they’re singing clean and it’s rather annoying. Their shouting is decent, sometimes overblown in the mix, but decent. And, look, I know they’re not trying to sound like angels, but I know they’ve put in enough effort to try not to sound like trash. But they still do. One of the songs where they don’t sound like complete ass is ‘Dysfunction (Legitimate Psychiatric Emergency)’. On this one they don’t try to hold a note, nor do they even attempt to sing, they just go crazy in a combination of industrial, punk, hip-hop, and more. Like something I could expect off a Tony Hawk soundtrack. 

So, the question is how do they improve? Well, for one, I would either get rid of the singing entirely, use guest vocalists, OR taking some vocal lessons because, as I stated above, their singing is horrendous. Keep the shouting, keep the anger, keep the attitude, but the singing has got to either be fixed upon or improved. The experimental nature of the album works to their advantage at times, and at others it bogs down the experience due to a chaotic mess in what should otherwise be a solid industrial hip-hop beat. The mix can be improved on some songs, where the music and bass is far outpowering the rhymes and lyrics that Pyramid Mission is seeking to push. If you have something important to address let the audience hear you. Lastly, cut songs so the album doesn’t feel like it’s doubling itself. ‘[descend x disappear] and ‘[blue flame candle]’ have no place on here, and one or two songs could have been shaved from the tracklist to make each song stand out a bit more. I don’t walk away from this album or group with malice, but disappointment in what otherwise could have been a pretty awesome debut.  
Jun 29 2024

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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