I Love My Chainsaw Industrial, Metal Powermouth Powermouth is a now defunct project which will hopefully be rebooted (the official site of the band gives me hope), as they have impressed me with this EP. They are a post apocalyptic industrial metal band that proclaims to be from the future, coming back to purge our ways and annihilate anything that they don't agree with while building an army of Garbage Vikings. If that's not enough to make an impression, than I don't know what is. They come screaming out of the gates with hyper active intentions and style that reminds me of the bandits from "Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior". Seriously, I could see these guys fitting right into that movie. From the get go, we're delivered the song that the EP was named after, which is "I Love My Chainsaw". Now, this song isn't pretty at all- lyrically wise, that is. It serves as a double entendre. On one point, you can take it for a guy who just wants to brutalize things with his chainsaw, or you could take it as a man who wants to just penetrate a woman using the analogy of a chainsaw in comparison to his penis. Penis talk aside, the song is very metal influenced more than anything, but it was very fun, quirky, and enjoyable. However, this is where the EP also lacks; the opening title was great and rough. But the rest of the release just seemed to dim down from there. The spark was lit, and the fuse was ready, but it just got put out by water. "The Great Dissection" was relatively calm in comparison to "I Love My Chainsaw", performing slower, but also demanding more use of synths and chimes, forming their industrial influences. "Firepower Superpower" is a lot more rhythmic with the vocals, and it works very well. "Fatherland" is another song on the album just focusing on guitar work and angry vocals, but still keeps up pace. "Use Your Mouth" is one of the more politically charged songs, with the lyrics proclaiming that they'll teach you how to rise up against your very own nation. It was catchy, and would be awesome to use in a time of great political reform and/or rebellion (such as in the current Gezi situation). This was one of the more inspirational songs on the album in comparison to the rest. There's also a few remixes on the album, but they don't do much for myself. However, what I do have a slight criticism for would be the themes of the album. Some of the songs are meant to be taken seriously more than not, while others are comical in a sense. It would've been nice to see Powermouth use their already great talents to charge more of a vitriolic stance against everything they claim they stand for. Nonetheless, I still find myself enjoying this EP, and have listened to "I Love My Chainsaw" a lot recently. I cannot stop with that one song for some reason or another; I suppose I just find it extremely catchy. I really do wish this project comes back to life in one form or the other; just don't get rid of the costumes and your style. It's too awesome to ditch. 450
Brutal Resonance

Powermouth - I Love My Chainsaw

8.0
"Great"
N/A
Electroracle
Spotify
Released 2012 by Vendetta Music
Powermouth is a now defunct project which will hopefully be rebooted (the official site of the band gives me hope), as they have impressed me with this EP. They are a post apocalyptic industrial metal band that proclaims to be from the future, coming back to purge our ways and annihilate anything that they don't agree with while building an army of Garbage Vikings. If that's not enough to make an impression, than I don't know what is. They come screaming out of the gates with hyper active intentions and style that reminds me of the bandits from "Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior". Seriously, I could see these guys fitting right into that movie.

From the get go, we're delivered the song that the EP was named after, which is "I Love My Chainsaw". Now, this song isn't pretty at all- lyrically wise, that is. It serves as a double entendre. On one point, you can take it for a guy who just wants to brutalize things with his chainsaw, or you could take it as a man who wants to just penetrate a woman using the analogy of a chainsaw in comparison to his penis.

Penis talk aside, the song is very metal influenced more than anything, but it was very fun, quirky, and enjoyable. However, this is where the EP also lacks; the opening title was great and rough. But the rest of the release just seemed to dim down from there. The spark was lit, and the fuse was ready, but it just got put out by water.

"The Great Dissection" was relatively calm in comparison to "I Love My Chainsaw", performing slower, but also demanding more use of synths and chimes, forming their industrial influences. "Firepower Superpower" is a lot more rhythmic with the vocals, and it works very well. "Fatherland" is another song on the album just focusing on guitar work and angry vocals, but still keeps up pace.

"Use Your Mouth" is one of the more politically charged songs, with the lyrics proclaiming that they'll teach you how to rise up against your very own nation. It was catchy, and would be awesome to use in a time of great political reform and/or rebellion (such as in the current Gezi situation). This was one of the more inspirational songs on the album in comparison to the rest.

There's also a few remixes on the album, but they don't do much for myself. However, what I do have a slight criticism for would be the themes of the album. Some of the songs are meant to be taken seriously more than not, while others are comical in a sense. It would've been nice to see Powermouth use their already great talents to charge more of a vitriolic stance against everything they claim they stand for.

Nonetheless, I still find myself enjoying this EP, and have listened to "I Love My Chainsaw" a lot recently. I cannot stop with that one song for some reason or another; I suppose I just find it extremely catchy. I really do wish this project comes back to life in one form or the other; just don't get rid of the costumes and your style. It's too awesome to ditch. Jun 06 2013

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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