The Unlearning Curve Goth, Industrial Post Death Soundtrack Post Death Soundtrack are a goth/industrial group from Calgary who released their newest album, The Unlearning Curve, about a month ago. This may be one of the more chipper offerings from the band, and indeed from goth rock in general, as Post Death Soundtrack have added elements of blues and alt rock as well as theatrical elements to their second album. While decidedly in goth territory, Post Death Soundtrack have some multi-genre tricks up their sleeves with The Unlearning Curve. Formed in 2007, Post Death Soundtrack have only had one other full-length album, 2008’s Music as Weaponry. Between then and now, however, the group have stayed marginally active and released a number of singles and even a Dead Can Dance cover. During a pseudo-hiatus, they opened for industrial legends Front Line Assembly and have been featured in a number of goth rags like Side-Line and Reflections of Darkness. Many goth and industrial fans hoped for a second album, and this year with The Unlearning Curve, they got their collective wish. Post Death Soundtrack have an interesting style. They combine classic goth and emo elements like those found in Bauhaus or Joy Division with more harmonized sounds of the early 90s like Alice In Chains. Additionally, this is a goth/industrial band who can write music, and it shows. Vocalists Ken Buck and Steve Moore have much more musicality to their voices than the average emo or goth singer. There’s nary a grumpy monotone to be found in the vocals, and this surprising element adds to the overall feel of Post Death Soundtrack’s sound and general energy. It’s, well…it’s kind of theatrical. Like the grumpiest musical ever, Post Death Soundtrack’s name is apt due to the high level of musicality and drama they bring to their sound despite their chosen genres. “That Which Is”, the first track on The Unlearning Curve, is a prime example of this unlikely mélange of styles. The track opens with typical goth subtlety and a wavering minor key in the vocals. The buildups and overall heft to the track, however, belie a classical arrangement or something from a very macabre musical theatre piece. In fact the whole track is clearly composed like a classical or musical theatre piece. One can almost block the scenes for “Post Death Soundtrack on Ice” or some such production, were one so inclined. That said, “That Which Is” is one of the more minimal-sounding tracks in the face of the rest of the album. A clear highlight on The Unlearning Curve is “Little Alice”, a very creepy and upsetting interpretation of Alice in Wonderland, as well as a social commentary on beauty. This track is legit industrial, with vocals like a better, more interesting Trent Reznor. Talk about theatrical; “Little Alice” has dueling scream vocals, a heavy industrial beat, and interludes of actual Alice dialog. This one has to be heard to be appreciated, so click the player below. “Little Alice” is an older one-off single from Post Death Soundtrack, and industrial-leaning fans should be thankful the band decided to include it on the album. It really shows the group’s diverse and compositionally strong chops. While Post Death Soundtrack are on solid goth and industrial footing, this band is diverse enough to gain fans of electronic, experimental and even classical music. At the very least, the discerning goth and industrial fan will appreciate the high level of song arrangement and theatrical nature to Post Death Soundtrack’s unique sound. Check here shortly for new songs, and enjoy The Unlearning Curve for free on the band’s Bandcamp Page.  4
Brutal Resonance

Post Death Soundtrack - The Unlearning Curve

7.5
"Good"
N/A
Electroracle
Released off label 2016
Post Death Soundtrack are a goth/industrial group from Calgary who released their newest album, The Unlearning Curve, about a month ago. This may be one of the more chipper offerings from the band, and indeed from goth rock in general, as Post Death Soundtrack have added elements of blues and alt rock as well as theatrical elements to their second album. While decidedly in goth territory, Post Death Soundtrack have some multi-genre tricks up their sleeves with The Unlearning Curve.

Formed in 2007, Post Death Soundtrack have only had one other full-length album, 2008’s Music as Weaponry. Between then and now, however, the group have stayed marginally active and released a number of singles and even a Dead Can Dance cover. During a pseudo-hiatus, they opened for industrial legends Front Line Assembly and have been featured in a number of goth rags like Side-Line and Reflections of Darkness. Many goth and industrial fans hoped for a second album, and this year with The Unlearning Curve, they got their collective wish.

Post Death Soundtrack have an interesting style. They combine classic goth and emo elements like those found in Bauhaus or Joy Division with more harmonized sounds of the early 90s like Alice In Chains. Additionally, this is a goth/industrial band who can write music, and it shows. Vocalists Ken Buck and Steve Moore have much more musicality to their voices than the average emo or goth singer. There’s nary a grumpy monotone to be found in the vocals, and this surprising element adds to the overall feel of Post Death Soundtrack’s sound and general energy. It’s, well…it’s kind of theatrical. Like the grumpiest musical ever, Post Death Soundtrack’s name is apt due to the high level of musicality and drama they bring to their sound despite their chosen genres.

“That Which Is”, the first track on The Unlearning Curve, is a prime example of this unlikely mélange of styles. The track opens with typical goth subtlety and a wavering minor key in the vocals. The buildups and overall heft to the track, however, belie a classical arrangement or something from a very macabre musical theatre piece. In fact the whole track is clearly composed like a classical or musical theatre piece. One can almost block the scenes for “Post Death Soundtrack on Ice” or some such production, were one so inclined. That said, “That Which Is” is one of the more minimal-sounding tracks in the face of the rest of the album.

A clear highlight on The Unlearning Curve is “Little Alice”, a very creepy and upsetting interpretation of Alice in Wonderland, as well as a social commentary on beauty. This track is legit industrial, with vocals like a better, more interesting Trent Reznor. Talk about theatrical; “Little Alice” has dueling scream vocals, a heavy industrial beat, and interludes of actual Alice dialog. This one has to be heard to be appreciated, so click the player below. “Little Alice” is an older one-off single from Post Death Soundtrack, and industrial-leaning fans should be thankful the band decided to include it on the album. It really shows the group’s diverse and compositionally strong chops.
While Post Death Soundtrack are on solid goth and industrial footing, this band is diverse enough to gain fans of electronic, experimental and even classical music. At the very least, the discerning goth and industrial fan will appreciate the high level of song arrangement and theatrical nature to Post Death Soundtrack’s unique sound. Check here shortly for new songs, and enjoy The Unlearning Curve for free on the band’s Bandcamp Page




Jul 30 2016

Off label

Official release released by the artist themselves without the backing of a label.

Layla Marino

info@brutalresonance.com
Writer and contributor on Brutal Resonance

Share this review

Facebook
Twitter
Google+
19
Shares

Shortly about us

Started in spring 2009, Brutal Resonance quickly grew from a Swedish based netzine into an established International zine of the highest standard.

We cover genres like Synthpop, EBM, Industrial, Dark Ambient, Neofolk, Darkwave, Noise and all their sub- and similar genres.

© Brutal Resonance 2009-2016
Designed by and developed by Head of Mímir 2016