Faith In The Void Electro-Industrial, Dark Electro PAIL A magnificent new chapter in the saga of Spain's Pail. While other bands remove their spines and devolve into their own flavor of pop music, Pail continue to innovate and evolve their sound beautifully. In the span of time since 2004's "Towards Nowhere", Manix Salazar has been keeping a low profile; I can see why when I listen to 'Faith in the Void'. All of his energies and resolve are sealed onto this disc, it is a staggering achievement of electronic purity he has composed. That it was mixed and mastered by the famed Greg Reely does not hurt, not one iota. This is a very clear sounding record and it is precise in ways others would be wise to sit up and take notice of. Exquisite design on the case and glossy insert also, no expense has been spared, I should slow down and provide a bit of background... it's hell getting old. Pail debuted in 1998 with the varied and engaging album 'Epidemic'. This one introduced many out there to a broader sound in the underground which has, over the last ten years, become a chart-chasing drama fest full of basement dwelling internet junkies who care more about what they look like than the actual music they purport to "produce". Manix doesn't scream his head off over the sultry synthetics nor are his lyrics fixated on passive aggressive "anger". He has plenty to say, but isn't going to beat you over the head with mindless repetition. That's something Pail do splendidly: they incorporate all manners of styles and sounds, bending and twisting them to fit their own imagination. And yet, there's another facet to the band: this is delirious, almost feverish creativity on display. Primarily, 'Faith in the Void' keeps the pulse rate high but for all the beats I'm never wondering why the songs don't end after the first chorus, I am giddily turning the volume up as high as my speakers can take. Play it loud, play it repeatedly but most importantly, play it for others. People have no idea what they're missing by not being fans of this guy: he only appears every few years and each time you're crossing your fingers hoping there will be more. For me, this one expands his section in my collection and I'm mighty mighty pleased about that, never a dull moment with what Salazar creates. His designs are what you'll come back to time and time again, three albums spread over thirteen years which only have the name of the band in common. This doesn't sound like what you've heard before, it is a finely honed diamond etching out sonic equations all over the inside of your head. People may wonder, why the 'techno' tag prefacing this review... because just like many artists in that field, Pail won't stay put and they won't do what anyone expects. Doubt me? Check out the vinyl-only EP Manix did in 2001, "Bei Finsterdem Tagasanbruch" and you will see just how far afield this Spanish outfit run from the safety of complacency. Enjoy the guitars on the track "Silence", and let the beauty of this song drown the world's sorrow in a few heartbeats. I haven't heard Pail do this sort of moody meditation before but my word, it sounds as though they've always had this ability but only now choose to transmit. Radio silence broken, the code is cracked and somewhere in the midst of all this pain and misery of life, light still comes in... one raises their eyes in determination to just get on with it. Ignoring the betrayals, shaking off the broken promises. We will endure, no matter how cold and cruel it gets out there amongst humanity. The tempo picks up and it's a fiery blur of programming fused to rhythmic perfection. Bloody hell, does this thing pack a wallop, the sheer compositional arc and remarkable complexity ought to send electrical shocks up and down your spine as it has done mine. Always the hallmark of an excellent electro outing: the hairs on my neck are standing up even though it's brutally hot in here. More, more I say. Give us more! 550
Brutal Resonance

PAIL - Faith In The Void

A magnificent new chapter in the saga of Spain's Pail. While other bands remove their spines and devolve into their own flavor of pop music, Pail continue to innovate and evolve their sound beautifully. In the span of time since 2004's "Towards Nowhere", Manix Salazar has been keeping a low profile; I can see why when I listen to 'Faith in the Void'. All of his energies and resolve are sealed onto this disc, it is a staggering achievement of electronic purity he has composed. That it was mixed and mastered by the famed Greg Reely does not hurt, not one iota. This is a very clear sounding record and it is precise in ways others would be wise to sit up and take notice of. Exquisite design on the case and glossy insert also, no expense has been spared, I should slow down and provide a bit of background... it's hell getting old.

Pail debuted in 1998 with the varied and engaging album 'Epidemic'. This one introduced many out there to a broader sound in the underground which has, over the last ten years, become a chart-chasing drama fest full of basement dwelling internet junkies who care more about what they look like than the actual music they purport to "produce". Manix doesn't scream his head off over the sultry synthetics nor are his lyrics fixated on passive aggressive "anger". He has plenty to say, but isn't going to beat you over the head with mindless repetition. That's something Pail do splendidly: they incorporate all manners of styles and sounds, bending and twisting them to fit their own imagination. And yet, there's another facet to the band: this is delirious, almost feverish creativity on display. Primarily, 'Faith in the Void' keeps the pulse rate high but for all the beats I'm never wondering why the songs don't end after the first chorus, I am giddily turning the volume up as high as my speakers can take.

Play it loud, play it repeatedly but most importantly, play it for others. People have no idea what they're missing by not being fans of this guy: he only appears every few years and each time you're crossing your fingers hoping there will be more. For me, this one expands his section in my collection and I'm mighty mighty pleased about that, never a dull moment with what Salazar creates. His designs are what you'll come back to time and time again, three albums spread over thirteen years which only have the name of the band in common. This doesn't sound like what you've heard before, it is a finely honed diamond etching out sonic equations all over the inside of your head. People may wonder, why the 'techno' tag prefacing this review... because just like many artists in that field, Pail won't stay put and they won't do what anyone expects. Doubt me? Check out the vinyl-only EP Manix did in 2001, "Bei Finsterdem Tagasanbruch" and you will see just how far afield this Spanish outfit run from the safety of complacency.

Enjoy the guitars on the track "Silence", and let the beauty of this song drown the world's sorrow in a few heartbeats. I haven't heard Pail do this sort of moody meditation before but my word, it sounds as though they've always had this ability but only now choose to transmit. Radio silence broken, the code is cracked and somewhere in the midst of all this pain and misery of life, light still comes in... one raises their eyes in determination to just get on with it. Ignoring the betrayals, shaking off the broken promises. We will endure, no matter how cold and cruel it gets out there amongst humanity. The tempo picks up and it's a fiery blur of programming fused to rhythmic perfection.

Bloody hell, does this thing pack a wallop, the sheer compositional arc and remarkable complexity ought to send electrical shocks up and down your spine as it has done mine. Always the hallmark of an excellent electro outing: the hairs on my neck are standing up even though it's brutally hot in here. More, more I say. Give us more!
May 21 2011

Peter Marks

info@brutalresonance.com
Writer and contributor on Brutal Resonance

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