Antipodes Classical, Minimal Ozymandias A more low key release I can't think of, Ozymandias have snuck another one out and seem quite content to have no one notice. Oh, but someone did. This is the eighth solo album which Mr. Christophe Terrettaz has completed since the birth of his project in 1996. I have followed him each and every step of the way, I suspect I'm the only fan he has in the United States, what his work is comprised of is this: a piano. That's it. There are no vocals, no choruses, no hooks. If you play this instrument (as I sometimes do) then you'll know his style isn't as simplistic as it sounds. I have wondered for years now precisely how he manages to keep each individual piece he composes straight in his head because they all incorporate incredible dynamics and intricate progressions. Listening to his debut, Isolement, those many years ago, I struggled in vain to keep up with his pacing. You won't find any lazy production crutches in what he does, no overpowering sustains nor does he hide behind walls of reverb. When he comes out of your speakers all you get is purity of tone and the personality of the composer shining through. Supposing you prefer more bombast, perhaps you like it bright and stately. He does that as well, with a minimum of fuss and precisely chosen notes. In the past he's had themes to his work, and Antipodes is no exception. How often have you ever gotten a geography lesson mixed into what you listen to? I'll answer that, rarely. But it is more than just the definition of this word which Ozymandias are gently playing with, I suspect he's drawing parallels between the nature of our locations in their physical sense and the vast gulfs of differences this world of ours is so expert at delineating. Look to your left, look to your right, walk around outside long enough and this pattern of fragmentation will become abundantly clear. It happens everyday but we're too absorbed in ourselves to notice how happily, almost giddily, we push others away. It is said that one cannot pass through one's life unaffected by the influences of others but we still try, as mentioned before when I reviewed ANBB's album: our goal is to be an island unto ourselves. I should not overlook the main facet which underlines and defines what he does: romanticism. Ozymandias are a purely gorgeous escape from the dreary, mundane business of everyday life. To hear his music is to be swept up to a splendid vista and then abandoned; be mindful of your surroundings, its a long way back down if you should fall. In the silent moments where your eyes levelly meet those of the one you love, music such as this becomes the underpinning; the electrified emotional resonance you feel when she holds your hand and says nothing. No words could ever encapsulate these kinds of sentiments properly but this is the arena of human interaction my favorite pianist operates within. Perhaps he doesn't see what he does as having such importance, you could count his live appearances on one hand, but I do. It may sound like just random instrumental mutterings to most but for as long as I've listened to Ozymandias he has never let me down. Yes, at times his tunes are dark and somewhat perplexing but I have the utmost respect for the tenacity and longevity of his project. If he were to just stop, who would take his place, can you think of ANYONE working in the modern age who does what he does. Sit down at a piano sometime and try it for yourself, chose your options from the three pedals beneath your feet and then attempt to play through your own thoughts as the ivories dance upon your fingers. The dexterity alone that this man possesses is lethal, his hands caress the keys and suavely coax out these majestic compositions. As hard as I try to summon up the nerve to focus all my creativity cataloging Antipodes, I know I'm coming up short. I suppose that's the point, the hidden agenda as it were that has been unwinding for nearly fifteen years now as I sit alone and seek to encapsulate how these records have affected me. I'll continue with my efforts just as surely as he will with his, the difference being that his legacy will assuredly be remembered even if so few know of him. Ozymandias have been a quiet companion I have long kept to myself and I hope he won't mind me introducing a few others to his elegant sound. 450
Brutal Resonance

Ozymandias - Antipodes

8.0
"Great"
N/A
Electroracle
Released 2012 by Terrettaz Records
A more low key release I can't think of, Ozymandias have snuck another one out and seem quite content to have no one notice. Oh, but someone did. This is the eighth solo album which Mr. Christophe Terrettaz has completed since the birth of his project in 1996. I have followed him each and every step of the way, I suspect I'm the only fan he has in the United States, what his work is comprised of is this: a piano. That's it. There are no vocals, no choruses, no hooks. If you play this instrument (as I sometimes do) then you'll know his style isn't as simplistic as it sounds. I have wondered for years now precisely how he manages to keep each individual piece he composes straight in his head because they all incorporate incredible dynamics and intricate progressions. Listening to his debut, Isolement, those many years ago, I struggled in vain to keep up with his pacing. You won't find any lazy production crutches in what he does, no overpowering sustains nor does he hide behind walls of reverb. When he comes out of your speakers all you get is purity of tone and the personality of the composer shining through.

Supposing you prefer more bombast, perhaps you like it bright and stately. He does that as well, with a minimum of fuss and precisely chosen notes. In the past he's had themes to his work, and Antipodes is no exception. How often have you ever gotten a geography lesson mixed into what you listen to? I'll answer that, rarely. But it is more than just the definition of this word which Ozymandias are gently playing with, I suspect he's drawing parallels between the nature of our locations in their physical sense and the vast gulfs of differences this world of ours is so expert at delineating. Look to your left, look to your right, walk around outside long enough and this pattern of fragmentation will become abundantly clear. It happens everyday but we're too absorbed in ourselves to notice how happily, almost giddily, we push others away. It is said that one cannot pass through one's life unaffected by the influences of others but we still try, as mentioned before when I reviewed ANBB's album: our goal is to be an island unto ourselves.

I should not overlook the main facet which underlines and defines what he does: romanticism. Ozymandias are a purely gorgeous escape from the dreary, mundane business of everyday life. To hear his music is to be swept up to a splendid vista and then abandoned; be mindful of your surroundings, its a long way back down if you should fall. In the silent moments where your eyes levelly meet those of the one you love, music such as this becomes the underpinning; the electrified emotional resonance you feel when she holds your hand and says nothing. No words could ever encapsulate these kinds of sentiments properly but this is the arena of human interaction my favorite pianist operates within. Perhaps he doesn't see what he does as having such importance, you could count his live appearances on one hand, but I do. It may sound like just random instrumental mutterings to most but for as long as I've listened to Ozymandias he has never let me down.

Yes, at times his tunes are dark and somewhat perplexing but I have the utmost respect for the tenacity and longevity of his project. If he were to just stop, who would take his place, can you think of ANYONE working in the modern age who does what he does. Sit down at a piano sometime and try it for yourself, chose your options from the three pedals beneath your feet and then attempt to play through your own thoughts as the ivories dance upon your fingers. The dexterity alone that this man possesses is lethal, his hands caress the keys and suavely coax out these majestic compositions. As hard as I try to summon up the nerve to focus all my creativity cataloging Antipodes, I know I'm coming up short. I suppose that's the point, the hidden agenda as it were that has been unwinding for nearly fifteen years now as I sit alone and seek to encapsulate how these records have affected me. I'll continue with my efforts just as surely as he will with his, the difference being that his legacy will assuredly be remembered even if so few know of him. Ozymandias have been a quiet companion I have long kept to myself and I hope he won't mind me introducing a few others to his elegant sound.
Apr 14 2012

Peter Marks

info@brutalresonance.com
Writer and contributor on Brutal Resonance

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