E.P ONE Industrial Rock Of These, Hope Two years ago, this release came to be. And, two years later, I have discovered it, and therefore I have decided to write of it in my ever expanding journey to support independent music and this tiny but fluent scene. Anyway, the act I speak of goes by the name of Of these, Hope. This is a side project of a man both involved in Monomorte and The Ladder, and that well talented man would happen to be Danny Dellamorte. Though I haven't really heard much of this project of his, and haven't much paid attention to The Ladder as of these days, I fell in love with the witch house sounds of Monomorte. So, with a love for one of his other projects, I could only assume that I would enjoy the works by this persona. And I was right (Gotta love being right). Although Dellamorte doesn't really put his project in any certain genre, I suppose I could just jump in here and say that there are elements of ambient movements as well as industrial rock. Anything more you can point out for yourself. Anyway, the EP begins off with 1 x 1, a simply titled song, and one that does begin off with some slight noises and static. It's sort of ambient at first, and slowly obtains a rhythm. It sort of fades out towards the end before launching us into the next song with a quick one second silence. Golgotha introduces us to the drum work that Of these, hope can bring out along with the rock sounds that perforate the music. The vocals are soft and fit the beat pretty well, keeping on a fading effect. Before long, isolation comes along to deliver even more rock elements. In a sense, I could see this song being described as pop rock. The last song begins off with a single synth note and some faint static. Slowly, it gets louder with a light beat, and then transforms into the softest song on the album thus far. More electronic than before beyond anything, this almost seemed like it could fit within a release with Monomorte, which kind of spoiled this identity. But, that's that. Now, I did like the industrial rock accents of this album. While they weren't anything to get too worked up over, they were still decent. However, the fourth song on the album had me sort of worried that perhaps his multiple music projects would cross over in sound, rendering the different names useless. But, so long as the sound continues to maintain its own identity from his other projects, I'm sure there will be a bountiful album worth coming out in the future. 350
Brutal Resonance

Of These, Hope - E.P ONE

6.5
"Alright"
N/A
Electroracle
Released off label 2012
Two years ago, this release came to be. And, two years later, I have discovered it, and therefore I have decided to write of it in my ever expanding journey to support independent music and this tiny but fluent scene. Anyway, the act I speak of goes by the name of Of these, Hope. This is a side project of a man both involved in Monomorte and The Ladder, and that well talented man would happen to be Danny Dellamorte.

Though I haven't really heard much of this project of his, and haven't much paid attention to The Ladder as of these days, I fell in love with the witch house sounds of Monomorte. So, with a love for one of his other projects, I could only assume that I would enjoy the works by this persona. And I was right (Gotta love being right).

Although Dellamorte doesn't really put his project in any certain genre, I suppose I could just jump in here and say that there are elements of ambient movements as well as industrial rock. Anything more you can point out for yourself.

Anyway, the EP begins off with 1 x 1, a simply titled song, and one that does begin off with some slight noises and static. It's sort of ambient at first, and slowly obtains a rhythm. It sort of fades out towards the end before launching us into the next song with a quick one second silence.

Golgotha introduces us to the drum work that Of these, hope can bring out along with the rock sounds that perforate the music. The vocals are soft and fit the beat pretty well, keeping on a fading effect. Before long, isolation comes along to deliver even more rock elements. In a sense, I could see this song being described as pop rock.

The last song begins off with a single synth note and some faint static. Slowly, it gets louder with a light beat, and then transforms into the softest song on the album thus far. More electronic than before beyond anything, this almost seemed like it could fit within a release with Monomorte, which kind of spoiled this identity.

But, that's that. Now, I did like the industrial rock accents of this album. While they weren't anything to get too worked up over, they were still decent. However, the fourth song on the album had me sort of worried that perhaps his multiple music projects would cross over in sound, rendering the different names useless. But, so long as the sound continues to maintain its own identity from his other projects, I'm sure there will be a bountiful album worth coming out in the future. Jun 03 2014

Off label

Official release released by the artist themselves without the backing of a label.

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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Started in spring 2009, Brutal Resonance quickly grew from a Swedish based netzine into an established International zine of the highest standard.

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