Demons Minimal, Darkwave Neon Lies With all of the intriguing and satisfying musical releases over the last few months, it could be easy to overlook something and completely miss it or be late to the party. Fortunately for me I was neither, as I have been actively following Neon Lies since the first release back in 2016. I was no doubt psyched to play the album when it arrived a few months back. Now that I have had some time to absorb everything Demons has to offer, I can truly say this is the best work to date. One of several reasons why Neon Lies resonates with me is their ability to successfully integrate modern technology into a sound that has roots in the proto-punk, minimal electronics and darkwave genres. There is a creative balance amongst the different influences that yield something more unique in a world where millions of artists are trying to make a niche, yet blend into the herd, not because it's not appealing but rather sounds too similar to everything else. Neon Lies finds some separation with their noticeable vocal style that is like a distant call carried by the winds. This has become one of several charms Neon Lies unveils with each subsequent release. The motif of the previous releases seeped its way into Demons with a noticeable menagerie new and familiar sounds woven into the fabrics of each song by the eldritch architects that wielded their skills to build out this great eleven-headed demon over the course of thirty seven minutes. The album could be seen as Neon Lies' version of an alternate variety of Hellraiser's most recent version of the Lament Configuration. Each turn of the box unlocks different experiences from Lament, Lore, Lauderant, Liminal, Lazarus and Leviathon. Each track from Demons reflects a different experience or a different demon if you will. As I figuratively twisted and turned the puzzle box, I commenced with the inaugural listen of the new album. I felt I was immediately pulled into the web of Demons right from the onset. The ritualistic and repetitive arrangement of "Hate" reminded me an 80's drama as the main character recklessly abandons all hope and fizzles out quietly as the credits start to roll and the music peters out. "Strange Place", shifts to a much more upbeat groove with a throbbing bassline paired with the high pitched drumming that really stands out as a testament to the thought put into each layer. As mentioned above, as the album progresses, each track explores another demon that dwells inside. Metaphorically speaking of course. Whether it's love ("Lovers"), death ("Teen"), war ("Kiev"), hate ("Hate") or anything else, the music creates an outlet or even some sort of coping mechanism for this crazy thing called life. It's almost as if I can will the vibe of each track to fit into some remote event I have experienced in my own life. From heartbreak to feeling overrun, this is certainly something we have all experienced. The moods created in each of the songs shift. This probably reflects what the artist was basing the experience on. "Overrun" stands out as a poignant reminder to the speed of life, harnessing an 80's minimal wave feel consistent throughout "Overrun as well as every other track. There is rapid-fire drum piece that originally bothered me, but after a few listens it seemed make the point that life can get out of control and the world can come crumbling down fast. "Brokenhearted" stands out with a powerful bassline to open the gate to let out the ghostly sounds that breathe grief into an already broken heart. The swirling synths darken the tone to an all out dirge into the melancholy, while the arrangement in "Lovers" is breath-taking and a bit uplifting. Uplifting is generally not a response Neon Lies may generate from their audience from a musical perspective, however the music brings on a sense positivity for some reason. It's definitely a bit out of place from my vantage point seeing each track as a demon to overcome. Each and every  composition has something delightfully dark and fresh to offer. The overall style within the music and the vocals remain constant throughout, however the attention to detail reveals many creative aspects that could be overlooked after the first go around. Whether its any of the previously mentioned tracks or the closing instrumental "2073", Demons will surprise you, it will intrigue and pique your darkest curiosities. The intricate sonic surgeries and precision cuts flesh out and give form each of the eleven demons that pull us into the world decorated in all of the allegory needed to start your journey with the new Neon Lies album.Fortunately you do not need to be a hardcore explorer into the further regions of experience to find demons. Demons can be found here in physical form and of course the ghostly digital form. Dig it!!!! 450
Brutal Resonance

Neon Lies - Demons

8.5
"Great"
Released 2024 by Wave Tension Records
With all of the intriguing and satisfying musical releases over the last few months, it could be easy to overlook something and completely miss it or be late to the party. Fortunately for me I was neither, as I have been actively following Neon Lies since the first release back in 2016. I was no doubt psyched to play the album when it arrived a few months back. Now that I have had some time to absorb everything Demons has to offer, I can truly say this is the best work to date.

One of several reasons why Neon Lies resonates with me is their ability to successfully integrate modern technology into a sound that has roots in the proto-punk, minimal electronics and darkwave genres. There is a creative balance amongst the different influences that yield something more unique in a world where millions of artists are trying to make a niche, yet blend into the herd, not because it's not appealing but rather sounds too similar to everything else. Neon Lies finds some separation with their noticeable vocal style that is like a distant call carried by the winds. This has become one of several charms Neon Lies unveils with each subsequent release.


The motif of the previous releases seeped its way into Demons with a noticeable menagerie new and familiar sounds woven into the fabrics of each song by the eldritch architects that wielded their skills to build out this great eleven-headed demon over the course of thirty seven minutes. The album could be seen as Neon Lies' version of an alternate variety of Hellraiser's most recent version of the Lament Configuration. Each turn of the box unlocks different experiences from Lament, Lore, Lauderant, Liminal, Lazarus and Leviathon. Each track from Demons reflects a different experience or a different demon if you will. As I figuratively twisted and turned the puzzle box, I commenced with the inaugural listen of the new album. I felt I was immediately pulled into the web of Demons right from the onset. The ritualistic and repetitive arrangement of "Hate" reminded me an 80's drama as the main character recklessly abandons all hope and fizzles out quietly as the credits start to roll and the music peters out. "Strange Place", shifts to a much more upbeat groove with a throbbing bassline paired with the high pitched drumming that really stands out as a testament to the thought put into each layer. As mentioned above, as the album progresses, each track explores another demon that dwells inside. Metaphorically speaking of course. Whether it's love ("Lovers"), death ("Teen"), war ("Kiev"), hate ("Hate") or anything else, the music creates an outlet or even some sort of coping mechanism for this crazy thing called life. It's almost as if I can will the vibe of each track to fit into some remote event I have experienced in my own life. From heartbreak to feeling overrun, this is certainly something we have all experienced. The moods created in each of the songs shift. This probably reflects what the artist was basing the experience on. "Overrun" stands out as a poignant reminder to the speed of life, harnessing an 80's minimal wave feel consistent throughout "Overrun as well as every other track. There is rapid-fire drum piece that originally bothered me, but after a few listens it seemed make the point that life can get out of control and the world can come crumbling down fast. "Brokenhearted" stands out with a powerful bassline to open the gate to let out the ghostly sounds that breathe grief into an already broken heart. The swirling synths darken the tone to an all out dirge into the melancholy, while the arrangement in "Lovers" is breath-taking and a bit uplifting. Uplifting is generally not a response Neon Lies may generate from their audience from a musical perspective, however the music brings on a sense positivity for some reason. It's definitely a bit out of place from my vantage point seeing each track as a demon to overcome.


Each and every  composition has something delightfully dark and fresh to offer. The overall style within the music and the vocals remain constant throughout, however the attention to detail reveals many creative aspects that could be overlooked after the first go around. Whether its any of the previously mentioned tracks or the closing instrumental "2073", Demons will surprise you, it will intrigue and pique your darkest curiosities. The intricate sonic surgeries and precision cuts flesh out and give form each of the eleven demons that pull us into the world decorated in all of the allegory needed to start your journey with the new Neon Lies album.

Fortunately you do not need to be a hardcore explorer into the further regions of experience to find demons. Demons can be found here in physical form and of course the ghostly digital form. Dig it!!!!



May 22 2024

Luke Jacobs

info@brutalresonance.com
Part time contributor since 2012 with over 150 contributions with reviews, interviews and news articles.

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