Bad Friday Industrial, Industrial Techno Muta-scuM As far as history goes, Muta-scuM is limited in that regard. The little information out about the project has them listed under industrial, noise, breakbeat, and techno. Muta-scuM was found in 2006 between Adam Styles and Paul Squires. The pair split shortly after a single was written, leaving Styles as the solo member of the project. Five years of experimental electronics were released culminating in their 2011 album "The Prayers Of Atheists". After a few singles in 2012, Styles put the project on an indefinite hiatus. 2020 sees Muta-scuM return with a double titled "Bad Friday". Described with a single quote on their Bandcamp page which reads, "When He chooses to die for us it is not our place to challenge God," I am hear to share my thoughts on it. Bad Friday (single) by Muta-scuM'Bad Friday' is the title track of the album and I would be lying if I said it was not messy. Punchy rhythmic electronics pulse and vibrate throughout the song with many misplaced samples and noises. The higher pitched synthetic notes built behind the music also became an irritant on subsequent listens. There is a talent behind the noise, nonetheless; there is a structure behind the raucous and with further refinement and perhaps less stuffing, it would have been more enjoyable. This is exemplified on the following song 'Magnificat v2'. What we're given is a thematic song with hymns a la Church choir groups and wonderful, crunchy rhythmic noise. The metallic clangs and playful experiments towards the third-quarter of the song gave it some deviation as well.So, of the two songs available on the double 'Magnificat v2' is far the superior, and I almost wish it were the title track rather than 'Bad Friday'. While 'Bad Friday' is not terrible, it pales in comparison to what Muta-scuM is capable of as displayed on 'Magnificat v2'. If Muta-scuM continues their return on the path of 'Magnificat v2', I am more than sure we'll be seeing great things from the project. But for a short, eight-year-in-the-making return, "Bad Friday" is not a bad place to begin. The double is available on Bandcamp as a name-your-price digital download and will be a welcome home to those who enjoy rhythmic noise, industrial, and crunchy beats. This review was commissioned through our Ko-fi page. Feel free to check it out for review, interview, and premiere opportunities.  350
Brutal Resonance

Muta-scuM - Bad Friday

6.5
"Alright"
Released off label 2021
As far as history goes, Muta-scuM is limited in that regard. The little information out about the project has them listed under industrial, noise, breakbeat, and techno. Muta-scuM was found in 2006 between Adam Styles and Paul Squires. The pair split shortly after a single was written, leaving Styles as the solo member of the project. Five years of experimental electronics were released culminating in their 2011 album "The Prayers Of Atheists". After a few singles in 2012, Styles put the project on an indefinite hiatus. 2020 sees Muta-scuM return with a double titled "Bad Friday". Described with a single quote on their Bandcamp page which reads, "When He chooses to die for us it is not our place to challenge God," I am hear to share my thoughts on it. 



'Bad Friday' is the title track of the album and I would be lying if I said it was not messy. Punchy rhythmic electronics pulse and vibrate throughout the song with many misplaced samples and noises. The higher pitched synthetic notes built behind the music also became an irritant on subsequent listens. There is a talent behind the noise, nonetheless; there is a structure behind the raucous and with further refinement and perhaps less stuffing, it would have been more enjoyable. This is exemplified on the following song 'Magnificat v2'. What we're given is a thematic song with hymns a la Church choir groups and wonderful, crunchy rhythmic noise. The metallic clangs and playful experiments towards the third-quarter of the song gave it some deviation as well.

So, of the two songs available on the double 'Magnificat v2' is far the superior, and I almost wish it were the title track rather than 'Bad Friday'. While 'Bad Friday' is not terrible, it pales in comparison to what Muta-scuM is capable of as displayed on 'Magnificat v2'. If Muta-scuM continues their return on the path of 'Magnificat v2', I am more than sure we'll be seeing great things from the project. But for a short, eight-year-in-the-making return, "Bad Friday" is not a bad place to begin. The double is available on Bandcamp as a name-your-price digital download and will be a welcome home to those who enjoy rhythmic noise, industrial, and crunchy beats. 

This review was commissioned through our Ko-fi page. Feel free to check it out for review, interview, and premiere opportunities. 
Jan 24 2021

Off label

Official release released by the artist themselves without the backing of a label.

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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