Hexennacht Neo-Classic Momy Fortuna Momy Fortuna is a quartet of witchy individuals combining the efforts of neo-classical music, darkwave, electronic violins, and more to create a "cult-wave" project. Inspired by horror film tracks, the project was founded by Brandy Bones. The name of the band is taken from the witch in the book The Last Unicorn. After Momy Fortuna's first single featuring Justin Hagberg of 3 Inches of Blood, Bones began to look for members to join her little cult. She found Emily Bach (electric violin), Bina Mendozza (drums), and Kat Bastow (keyboardist and vocalist). Touching the likes of black metal, 70's occultism, horror, and so much more, Momy Fortuna has been teasing their debut album for the better part of 2021 with the singles 'Hexennacht', 'Suspiria', and 'Be Rather' part of the fun. Now the time has come for Momy Fortuna to unleash their spellbinding debut album "Hexennacht". Let's get right into it. Hexennacht by Momy Fortuna'Be Rather' starts off the album. Immediately, the bass guitar in the song brings about occult vibes thanks to wicked strumming. Howling occurs in the background from Bones and I feel as if this is a perfect introductory song to the group. It makes me feel as if I am lost in the woods and, in the distance, I see but a faint light from a fire. As I get closer, this song is playing, and as I stumble into the middle of this makeshift campfire I find myself in the (hopefully) good graces of four witches. In the middle of their ritual, I can only hope to not be thrown in the cauldron. Perhaps my imagination went a little wild when describing the song, but I can't help it; it make my mind wander. Also present on the track are amazing black metal like cries, though not as raw as you might expect from something within the genre.Heavy breathing begins off 'L'Oubliette' before I was sent into the thick of this French song. There are blasts between epic segments of cursed strings, drums, and general spookiness and quieter moments where Bones' vocals and Bach's turn on the violin shine. 'Natas Liah' sounds like a song that would be played in the middle of an Addams Family ball; it's a well-crafted orchestra of danceable darkwave goodness filled with multi-layered chants. I absolutely adore the title track on the album, 'Hexennacht'. It's a slow gothrock ballad that is quite bluntly hypnotic and perfect. The keys and drums slamming down at the same time in the beginning of the song catch my immediate attention, as Bones' voice paints a siren-like calling. The violin soothes the soul as the drums tick menacingly along to the beat. The bass guitar is used to grand effect, culminating with the other instruments for the best song on the album. 'Hexennacht' is also able to transition from set-piece to set-piece throughout its five-minute duration with ease. Throughout the week I spent with it, not once did I bore of it and I constantly found myself impatiently awaiting its arrival on the album. Following 'Hexannacht' comes 'Sleeping Man'. Whispers telling me to go to sleep (I absolutely won't) and frenetic violin brings me into deeper gothrock territory. Momy Fortuna then walks on thin ice by covering Goblin's theme song for Suspiria. It's dangerous covering such a venerated song, however, Momy Fortuna does more than just a tribute to the track. It's a glorious reimagining that takes the original spooky theme into the modern age. If this were released only a few years prior to 2021, it should have been included in the remake of Suspiria. Now, there are two tracks on the album that I was not very fond of, those being 'Apollockalypse' and 'Hail Satan'. My complaint for both of these songs remains kind of consistent; there's not much of a song so much as it is experimental segments pieced together. While 'Apollockalypse' tends to stand tall mixing neoclassical elements with black metal styled vocals, the first half of the song is too wild to really appreciate. It's not until the second half where the track becomes palatable to my ear. And, as much as I love worshipping our dark lord from down under, 'Hail Satan' is just the reversed version of 'Natas Liah'. It does pay homage to the age old myth of, "If you play that record backwards it talks of Satan." But, I would have much rather that have been an Easter Egg than anything else. Because, as it stands, reversed the song doesn't sound that great. Despite my dislike for the previous two songs, there's an undeniable charm that's applied to "Hexennacht". To me, "Hexennacht" stands out as more than just music; it's a thematic art piece and a labor of love from the four women behind the project. The elements of horror, suspense, occultism, and generally dark music are masterfully crafted. Whenever I spun this album throughout the week, I found myself awaiting for it with anticipation amongst the other albums in rotation. I hope this album gets released on vinyl with the liner notes included, as I believe that the full experience can only be acquired through those. Easily an eight-and-a-half out of ten and one of the highlights of my year so far. This review was commissioned through our Ko-fi page. 450
Brutal Resonance

Momy Fortuna - Hexennacht

8.5
"Great"
Released off label 2021
Momy Fortuna is a quartet of witchy individuals combining the efforts of neo-classical music, darkwave, electronic violins, and more to create a "cult-wave" project. Inspired by horror film tracks, the project was founded by Brandy Bones. The name of the band is taken from the witch in the book The Last Unicorn. After Momy Fortuna's first single featuring Justin Hagberg of 3 Inches of Blood, Bones began to look for members to join her little cult. She found Emily Bach (electric violin), Bina Mendozza (drums), and Kat Bastow (keyboardist and vocalist). Touching the likes of black metal, 70's occultism, horror, and so much more, Momy Fortuna has been teasing their debut album for the better part of 2021 with the singles 'Hexennacht', 'Suspiria', and 'Be Rather' part of the fun. 

Now the time has come for Momy Fortuna to unleash their spellbinding debut album "Hexennacht". Let's get right into it. 



'Be Rather' starts off the album. Immediately, the bass guitar in the song brings about occult vibes thanks to wicked strumming. Howling occurs in the background from Bones and I feel as if this is a perfect introductory song to the group. It makes me feel as if I am lost in the woods and, in the distance, I see but a faint light from a fire. As I get closer, this song is playing, and as I stumble into the middle of this makeshift campfire I find myself in the (hopefully) good graces of four witches. In the middle of their ritual, I can only hope to not be thrown in the cauldron. Perhaps my imagination went a little wild when describing the song, but I can't help it; it make my mind wander. Also present on the track are amazing black metal like cries, though not as raw as you might expect from something within the genre.

Heavy breathing begins off 'L'Oubliette' before I was sent into the thick of this French song. There are blasts between epic segments of cursed strings, drums, and general spookiness and quieter moments where Bones' vocals and Bach's turn on the violin shine. 'Natas Liah' sounds like a song that would be played in the middle of an Addams Family ball; it's a well-crafted orchestra of danceable darkwave goodness filled with multi-layered chants. 

I absolutely adore the title track on the album, 'Hexennacht'. It's a slow gothrock ballad that is quite bluntly hypnotic and perfect. The keys and drums slamming down at the same time in the beginning of the song catch my immediate attention, as Bones' voice paints a siren-like calling. The violin soothes the soul as the drums tick menacingly along to the beat. The bass guitar is used to grand effect, culminating with the other instruments for the best song on the album. 'Hexennacht' is also able to transition from set-piece to set-piece throughout its five-minute duration with ease. Throughout the week I spent with it, not once did I bore of it and I constantly found myself impatiently awaiting its arrival on the album. 

Following 'Hexannacht' comes 'Sleeping Man'. Whispers telling me to go to sleep (I absolutely won't) and frenetic violin brings me into deeper gothrock territory. Momy Fortuna then walks on thin ice by covering Goblin's theme song for Suspiria. It's dangerous covering such a venerated song, however, Momy Fortuna does more than just a tribute to the track. It's a glorious reimagining that takes the original spooky theme into the modern age. If this were released only a few years prior to 2021, it should have been included in the remake of Suspiria


Now, there are two tracks on the album that I was not very fond of, those being 'Apollockalypse' and 'Hail Satan'. My complaint for both of these songs remains kind of consistent; there's not much of a song so much as it is experimental segments pieced together. While 'Apollockalypse' tends to stand tall mixing neoclassical elements with black metal styled vocals, the first half of the song is too wild to really appreciate. It's not until the second half where the track becomes palatable to my ear. And, as much as I love worshipping our dark lord from down under, 'Hail Satan' is just the reversed version of 'Natas Liah'. It does pay homage to the age old myth of, "If you play that record backwards it talks of Satan." But, I would have much rather that have been an Easter Egg than anything else. Because, as it stands, reversed the song doesn't sound that great. 

Despite my dislike for the previous two songs, there's an undeniable charm that's applied to "Hexennacht". To me, "Hexennacht" stands out as more than just music; it's a thematic art piece and a labor of love from the four women behind the project. The elements of horror, suspense, occultism, and generally dark music are masterfully crafted. Whenever I spun this album throughout the week, I found myself awaiting for it with anticipation amongst the other albums in rotation. I hope this album gets released on vinyl with the liner notes included, as I believe that the full experience can only be acquired through those. Easily an eight-and-a-half out of ten and one of the highlights of my year so far. 

This review was commissioned through our Ko-fi page.
Jun 13 2021

Off label

Official release released by the artist themselves without the backing of a label.

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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