Virgae Experimental, Industrial Genitor Lvminis First of all a comment about the design, the CD is a mini CD, the one kind that you put in the small tray in the CD player. The case, if you can call it that is in the shape of a congratulations card, you know the ones that folded in the middle. Anyway, it's an interesting way of creating a record and it definitely catches your attention. With two releases behind him Magnus Engwall isn't a newcomer in the scene. He describes his music as a different world view that is focused on being of myth. The music itself is a combination of traditional instrument (digitally processed or sampled) and string instruments, but also alternative sound sources. I think this was an interesting sound experience because the music is always changing, progressive. It's a composition with many faces that's been coloured by the different elements in the music. Everything from the darker bass sounds that makes the spine of the music to the brighter tones and sounds that makes the melodies feels right and well done. It's hard to find a favourite among these two tracks, it's more like I like the whole composition as one unit. Really great. This review was written 2004 and initially published on Neurozine.com 550
Brutal Resonance

Genitor Lvminis - Virgae

9.0
"Amazing"
N/A
Electroracle
Released 2004 by Stateart
First of all a comment about the design, the CD is a mini CD, the one kind that you put in the small tray in the CD player. The case, if you can call it that is in the shape of a congratulations card, you know the ones that folded in the middle. Anyway, it's an interesting way of creating a record and it definitely catches your attention.

With two releases behind him Magnus Engwall isn't a newcomer in the scene. He describes his music as a different world view that is focused on being of myth. The music itself is a combination of traditional instrument (digitally processed or sampled) and string instruments, but also alternative sound sources. I think this was an interesting sound experience because the music is always changing, progressive. It's a composition with many faces that's been coloured by the different elements in the music. Everything from the darker bass sounds that makes the spine of the music to the brighter tones and sounds that makes the melodies feels right and well done.

It's hard to find a favourite among these two tracks, it's more like I like the whole composition as one unit. Really great.

This review was written 2004 and initially published on Neurozine.com
Jan 01 2004

John Wikström

info@brutalresonance.com
Writer and contributor on Brutal Resonance

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