UNFLESH Minimal, Dark Electro Gazelle Twin I remember the first time I set my eyes upon the oddity that is Gazelle Twin, the Brighton based minimal, dark electro, and otherwise tasteful (some might even say tasteless) project stemmed from the constantly thinking mind of Elizabeth Bernholz. Arising in 2011 with their debut LP, The Entire City, her background in classical composition shined through, whereas beautiful music met Bernholz's one-of-a-kind fashion. She sports not more than a blue hood, blue sweats, white socks and black shoes, all the while making sure her face is always covered and never seen; it adds to the overall goal of keeping the project gender neutral but also slides in a bit of mystery, making the audience want to peel the layers presented to discover more. That's at least the effect that shuddered me; I saw her project, and I wanted to know more. 2013 saw the return of GT, with a seven track EP titled Mammal. And, this experimental release showcased a transition for Bernholz; where as her ambient works that so carried forth The Entire City to prominence, the first song on the album I Turn My Arm pushed out a down tempo rhythm with vocals filtered with digital fragrance. Although parts of the album came with clean chords, it still marked a turning point; and one where her latest album, UNFLESH would be born. Almost untraceable from its predecessors, UNFLESH was promoted by the release of two singles, the first being Belly Of The Beast which released back on the third of March in 2014. A single/video combination brought out a heavy song with a noisey, bass driven rhythm and a more aggressive vocal delivery from Bernholz. The lyrical content was often poetic, and depending on whoever was reading it, could be translated into more view than just one; however, it was with her next single/video drop that UNFLESH's true nature would be unveiled. Anti Body saw the light of day about two months after Belly of the Beast, this time coming out with two remixes and a B-side track (also getting the limited 12" blue vinyl treatment). Showcasing the song as to when she was fourteen and talking of suffering and not being heard by those around her, wanting an escape, precisely displayed the whole coming of age phenomenon and all the struggles, heartaches, and headaches that come with it. While we, now, as adults can easily go about our lives, there are always those suppressed images in the back of our minds as childhood drama; our demons, in all other words. While they may remain in the deepest, darkest pits of our conscience, they are always waiting for one trigger or another to appear so they can escape their cage and haunt you once more. These demons, as I put, are never fully rested, and as younger people, when no one will listen, at an age when everything is thrown off as either a tantrum or hormonal, that can lead to severe mental problems as the body grows older. And, with UNFLESH, Bernholz decided to face her demons that have been plaguing her ever since she was a child. I would have no doubt that when writing this album she had horrors from the past confront her once more, that much can be said, but the overall experience of having finally put to rest obstacles that have been tormenting her since she was younger delivers a very powerful message out to everyone who may listen to UNFLESH. From the beginning sonic and digital shriek found in the title track of the album, a strong presence, one that is in control, formulates and sticks through the rest of the music. This is not a person who is letting the past get the best of her; this is a capable and firm woman taking control of the wheel, and is not letting a single person tell her otherwise. Each track on the album plays with a stripped form of dark electronics and minimal synth form, focusing on vocal delivery and usually faster paced rhythms. Of course, the already talked about and very well received Anti Body and Belly of the Beast both appear on the album, and their placement is impeccable. While there is no one song that is weak on the album, there are some that stand out way more than the others, giving me goosebumps as I listen and enjoy with a wicked smile shooting across my face. Exorcise is one of those songs, which begins off with soft sounds which paves way for a sort of drum'n'bass driven song later on; the evolution within it is fantastic. The ambient and drone work that helped kick off the career of GT makes a comeback in Child, as her high pitched vocals plays in the fields of the forgotten for a short, but ever lasting duration. And, lastly, the last song I wish to point your attention to would be Human Touch; the breaths that GT utilizes becomes an instrument within itself, and, again, an evolution within the song is presented through a four minute craft. I always find that in personal works, I myself and swept up in the moment and feel the exact struggle that the artist has gone through. Whether or not it's the case of me trying to connect with the pain the musician has gone through, or if it's just that I get so caught up with the music that I just can't help but allow myself to enter their shoes for a moment is unknown to me. However, whenever this happens, I know that an emotionally shocking and mentally powerful message has just struck me right across the face, and Bernolz has managed to do that with UNFLESH. Do not let the mere appearance and themes of GT put you off; this is an album that is worth every minute and every second that you may allow yourself to put towards it. But, I do think that the term "album" just cannot explain what has been created here. No, album is not the word. This is more than that. This is an experience. A personal journey into the most private and vulnerable areas of a secluded mind. Enter this album and live through someone else's horror, but also their salvation. 550
Brutal Resonance

Gazelle Twin - UNFLESH

9.0
"Amazing"
Spotify
Released 2014 by Anti-Ghost Moon Ray
I remember the first time I set my eyes upon the oddity that is Gazelle Twin, the Brighton based minimal, dark electro, and otherwise tasteful (some might even say tasteless) project stemmed from the constantly thinking mind of Elizabeth Bernholz. Arising in 2011 with their debut LP, The Entire City, her background in classical composition shined through, whereas beautiful music met Bernholz's one-of-a-kind fashion. She sports not more than a blue hood, blue sweats, white socks and black shoes, all the while making sure her face is always covered and never seen; it adds to the overall goal of keeping the project gender neutral but also slides in a bit of mystery, making the audience want to peel the layers presented to discover more. That's at least the effect that shuddered me; I saw her project, and I wanted to know more.

2013 saw the return of GT, with a seven track EP titled Mammal. And, this experimental release showcased a transition for Bernholz; where as her ambient works that so carried forth The Entire City to prominence, the first song on the album I Turn My Arm pushed out a down tempo rhythm with vocals filtered with digital fragrance. Although parts of the album came with clean chords, it still marked a turning point; and one where her latest album, UNFLESH would be born.

Almost untraceable from its predecessors, UNFLESH was promoted by the release of two singles, the first being Belly Of The Beast which released back on the third of March in 2014. A single/video combination brought out a heavy song with a noisey, bass driven rhythm and a more aggressive vocal delivery from Bernholz. The lyrical content was often poetic, and depending on whoever was reading it, could be translated into more view than just one; however, it was with her next single/video drop that UNFLESH's true nature would be unveiled.

Anti Body saw the light of day about two months after Belly of the Beast, this time coming out with two remixes and a B-side track (also getting the limited 12" blue vinyl treatment). Showcasing the song as to when she was fourteen and talking of suffering and not being heard by those around her, wanting an escape, precisely displayed the whole coming of age phenomenon and all the struggles, heartaches, and headaches that come with it.

While we, now, as adults can easily go about our lives, there are always those suppressed images in the back of our minds as childhood drama; our demons, in all other words. While they may remain in the deepest, darkest pits of our conscience, they are always waiting for one trigger or another to appear so they can escape their cage and haunt you once more. These demons, as I put, are never fully rested, and as younger people, when no one will listen, at an age when everything is thrown off as either a tantrum or hormonal, that can lead to severe mental problems as the body grows older.

And, with UNFLESH, Bernholz decided to face her demons that have been plaguing her ever since she was a child. I would have no doubt that when writing this album she had horrors from the past confront her once more, that much can be said, but the overall experience of having finally put to rest obstacles that have been tormenting her since she was younger delivers a very powerful message out to everyone who may listen to UNFLESH.

From the beginning sonic and digital shriek found in the title track of the album, a strong presence, one that is in control, formulates and sticks through the rest of the music. This is not a person who is letting the past get the best of her; this is a capable and firm woman taking control of the wheel, and is not letting a single person tell her otherwise.

Each track on the album plays with a stripped form of dark electronics and minimal synth form, focusing on vocal delivery and usually faster paced rhythms. Of course, the already talked about and very well received Anti Body and Belly of the Beast both appear on the album, and their placement is impeccable.

While there is no one song that is weak on the album, there are some that stand out way more than the others, giving me goosebumps as I listen and enjoy with a wicked smile shooting across my face. Exorcise is one of those songs, which begins off with soft sounds which paves way for a sort of drum'n'bass driven song later on; the evolution within it is fantastic. The ambient and drone work that helped kick off the career of GT makes a comeback in Child, as her high pitched vocals plays in the fields of the forgotten for a short, but ever lasting duration. And, lastly, the last song I wish to point your attention to would be Human Touch; the breaths that GT utilizes becomes an instrument within itself, and, again, an evolution within the song is presented through a four minute craft.

I always find that in personal works, I myself and swept up in the moment and feel the exact struggle that the artist has gone through. Whether or not it's the case of me trying to connect with the pain the musician has gone through, or if it's just that I get so caught up with the music that I just can't help but allow myself to enter their shoes for a moment is unknown to me. However, whenever this happens, I know that an emotionally shocking and mentally powerful message has just struck me right across the face, and Bernolz has managed to do that with UNFLESH.

Do not let the mere appearance and themes of GT put you off; this is an album that is worth every minute and every second that you may allow yourself to put towards it. But, I do think that the term "album" just cannot explain what has been created here. No, album is not the word. This is more than that. This is an experience. A personal journey into the most private and vulnerable areas of a secluded mind. Enter this album and live through someone else's horror, but also their salvation.
Feb 12 2015

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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