The Second Sun Coldwave, Darkwave Der Klinke Formed in 2009, Belgian act Der Klinke released their debut album, 'Square Moon', in 2011, quickly followed by 'The Second Sun' in 2012. Even though there wasn't much time between the release of the two albums, Der Klinke here, on 'The Second Sun', show that they're truly finding their place and their sound, defining themselves as a recognizable act. Heavily reminiscent of 80s and early 90s goth-type music with more modern synth and structure elements thrown in, this album took me back many years to a self that reveled in blends of atmospheric synths, rockish guitars, and deep, mournful vocals. While Der Klinke's style is no longer my preferred type of music, I'm looking at this album as my 18-year-old self would have, driving along in my car at night with the music blaring (I did that a lot back then - still do, actually). 'The Second Sun' opens with "Pictures in My Mind", a good choice for an intro because it sets the stage for the overall feel of the album. Atmospheric synths build up, joined by a drumbeat and reverberating, echoey vocals. It's full, rich, and shows true presence that lingers after the final note, which makes for a bit of a jarring effect when track two, "House of Belief", begins. After the slow, relaxed end to track one, "House of Belief" commences with an upbeat tempo that segues into something that really showcases that reminiscence of 80s and early 90s goth that I mentioned. It follows a classic song structure that was popular during that time, with fairly simple, full guitar riffs that break off into high-pitched meanderings for a bit, and chant-like, mellow vocals that crescendo into plaintive wails during the chorus. The sound and styling of the vocals in this song particularly call to mind Rozz Williams of Christian Death. Given the Joy Division links that were particularly noticeable in their debut album, Der Klinke seem to have a knack for channeling talented singer/songwriters who died of suicide. Interesting trait. Being a former violinist and a member of various orchestras for years, I have to give a nod to track three, "Chasing Shadows". While there are vocals in this song, it is much more about the instrumentals (or perhaps I simply notice them more given my history), with synths being joined by string instruments. There is a somewhat subtle feel of symphony-like movements within this song. I'd actually be curious to hear what they could do with it if they were to pick this song back up and concentrate on it as a solely instrumental piece (this is not at all a criticism of the vocals), expanding it and more fully developing the separate elements. With track four, we again find some major old-school influence, this time reminding me of Clan of Xymox. "The Game" opens with stuttering, reverberating synths in a style that I generally associate with that iconic act, and the vocals are reminiscent of them as well. Featuring the vocal talents of Martin Bowes of Attrition, this track does take a decidedly non-Xymox turn when it breaks into a deep, raspy spoken-word section about midway through the song. It changes up the song interestingly. Track five, "Universal Energy", is purely instrumental, with a nice blend of drawn-out synths, quick, rhythmic guitar riffs, and violins. It's not particularly memorable to me, but it has a good flow to it. Moving on to track six, the titular song "The Second Sun" provides what I found to be the most interesting vocals on the album. Bassist Sam Claeys joins vocalist Geert Vandekerkhof on this track, and Claeys' higher, more melodic voice pairs nicely with Vandekerkhof's deep, full stylings. They should consider partnering more frequently in the future. If you're looking for a track to dance to on this album, track seven, "Las Fabricas", is probably your best bet. An aggressive synth line and beat are joined by a classically dance-worthy synth line and the vocals are more so exclamations/proclamations than they are melodies. It's followed by "In Flames", another track that might do well on the dancefloor, although the energy isn't consistent enough for it to be as much of a success. I previously mentioned Der Klinke's Joy Division influences - well, this track calls JD to mind, as well as their rebirth, New Order, especially where the guitar is concerned. Track nine, "Love in Colours", features guest vocalist Jock McDonald from The Bollock Brothers, and the stylings are noticeably different from those on the other tracks. "Love in Colours" is much more rock-oriented than any other track on the album, and would likely have mainstream appeal. Its placement as the second to last song on the album is an interesting choice, as its style and energy level is markedly different from the following and final track, "Last Moments", an instrumental piece featuring various synths and an ethereal, wordless female voice. It isn't exceptionally interesting, but it's a good background tune and was a good choice for a closer. 'The Second Sun' was quite an interesting journey down memory lane for me. As I said, this isn't the type of music you'll usually catch me listening to these days (I'm more of an aggrotech girl) but I know my coldwave and gothier music from my younger days, and for those who are fans of those genres, Der Klinke is an act to follow. 450
Brutal Resonance

Der Klinke - The Second Sun

8.0
"Great"
N/A
Electroracle
Spotify
Released 2012 by Echozone
Formed in 2009, Belgian act Der Klinke released their debut album, 'Square Moon', in 2011, quickly followed by 'The Second Sun' in 2012. Even though there wasn't much time between the release of the two albums, Der Klinke here, on 'The Second Sun', show that they're truly finding their place and their sound, defining themselves as a recognizable act. Heavily reminiscent of 80s and early 90s goth-type music with more modern synth and structure elements thrown in, this album took me back many years to a self that reveled in blends of atmospheric synths, rockish guitars, and deep, mournful vocals. While Der Klinke's style is no longer my preferred type of music, I'm looking at this album as my 18-year-old self would have, driving along in my car at night with the music blaring (I did that a lot back then - still do, actually).

'The Second Sun' opens with "Pictures in My Mind", a good choice for an intro because it sets the stage for the overall feel of the album. Atmospheric synths build up, joined by a drumbeat and reverberating, echoey vocals. It's full, rich, and shows true presence that lingers after the final note, which makes for a bit of a jarring effect when track two, "House of Belief", begins. After the slow, relaxed end to track one, "House of Belief" commences with an upbeat tempo that segues into something that really showcases that reminiscence of 80s and early 90s goth that I mentioned. It follows a classic song structure that was popular during that time, with fairly simple, full guitar riffs that break off into high-pitched meanderings for a bit, and chant-like, mellow vocals that crescendo into plaintive wails during the chorus. The sound and styling of the vocals in this song particularly call to mind Rozz Williams of Christian Death. Given the Joy Division links that were particularly noticeable in their debut album, Der Klinke seem to have a knack for channeling talented singer/songwriters who died of suicide. Interesting trait.

Being a former violinist and a member of various orchestras for years, I have to give a nod to track three, "Chasing Shadows". While there are vocals in this song, it is much more about the instrumentals (or perhaps I simply notice them more given my history), with synths being joined by string instruments. There is a somewhat subtle feel of symphony-like movements within this song. I'd actually be curious to hear what they could do with it if they were to pick this song back up and concentrate on it as a solely instrumental piece (this is not at all a criticism of the vocals), expanding it and more fully developing the separate elements.

With track four, we again find some major old-school influence, this time reminding me of Clan of Xymox. "The Game" opens with stuttering, reverberating synths in a style that I generally associate with that iconic act, and the vocals are reminiscent of them as well. Featuring the vocal talents of Martin Bowes of Attrition, this track does take a decidedly non-Xymox turn when it breaks into a deep, raspy spoken-word section about midway through the song. It changes up the song interestingly.

Track five, "Universal Energy", is purely instrumental, with a nice blend of drawn-out synths, quick, rhythmic guitar riffs, and violins. It's not particularly memorable to me, but it has a good flow to it. Moving on to track six, the titular song "The Second Sun" provides what I found to be the most interesting vocals on the album. Bassist Sam Claeys joins vocalist Geert Vandekerkhof on this track, and Claeys' higher, more melodic voice pairs nicely with Vandekerkhof's deep, full stylings. They should consider partnering more frequently in the future.

If you're looking for a track to dance to on this album, track seven, "Las Fabricas", is probably your best bet. An aggressive synth line and beat are joined by a classically dance-worthy synth line and the vocals are more so exclamations/proclamations than they are melodies. It's followed by "In Flames", another track that might do well on the dancefloor, although the energy isn't consistent enough for it to be as much of a success. I previously mentioned Der Klinke's Joy Division influences - well, this track calls JD to mind, as well as their rebirth, New Order, especially where the guitar is concerned.

Track nine, "Love in Colours", features guest vocalist Jock McDonald from The Bollock Brothers, and the stylings are noticeably different from those on the other tracks. "Love in Colours" is much more rock-oriented than any other track on the album, and would likely have mainstream appeal. Its placement as the second to last song on the album is an interesting choice, as its style and energy level is markedly different from the following and final track, "Last Moments", an instrumental piece featuring various synths and an ethereal, wordless female voice. It isn't exceptionally interesting, but it's a good background tune and was a good choice for a closer.

'The Second Sun' was quite an interesting journey down memory lane for me. As I said, this isn't the type of music you'll usually catch me listening to these days (I'm more of an aggrotech girl) but I know my coldwave and gothier music from my younger days, and for those who are fans of those genres, Der Klinke is an act to follow. Dec 02 2012

Jessica S

info@brutalresonance.com
Writer and contributor on Brutal Resonance

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