The Ignorance Cartel Electropunk, Industrial Angelspit It is a dark humor conundrum to look at Angelspit's latest album "The Ignorance Cartel" and compare it to the recent world events that surrounded its release. Though never intended to coincide with the Covid-19 outbreak (its progress was started twelve months before the pandemic hit) it's hard to deviate the cyberpunk-rooted material, themes, and lyrics from all that's been said about and during the infestation. As Angelspit has explained through both press releases and on his Bandcamp page, the lockdown, the pandemic, mass unemployment, and a flood of disinformation pushed him to produce "The Ignorance Cartel" into darker and heavier turfs during a four-month post-production period. With an initial release date of October 20th, 2020, I am finally here to give the album a review and write-up.The album's theme is spoken aloud just by taking a quick glance at the cover art. The red-suited menace (whether due to lighting or actual color) looks at me with an eerie smile, black metal inspired eye makeup, and white, glowing eyes. A dunce cap with symbols sit atop their head and I can only imagine that this is the ring-leader of the titular Ignorance Cartel the album spouts on about. As I always state, the cover art of an album never gives or takes points away from the album, but this is one Hell of a way to attract potential listeners to your music. The Ignorance Cartel by AngelspitWhat we find on the album, then, is what you would expect from Zoog Von Rock. Electronic rock inspired by industrial with various influences from outside sources such as glitch, hip hop, and punk. I was given a slice of that when I hit the play button for the first track 'EAT THE CHILDREN'. Dealing with the hypnotic effect big corporations bring out to quell the masses, the song itself has a danceable underlying beat with warning synths in the background like we're in an episode of The Twilight Zone. Accompanying crunchy guitars and background vocals help the song along for the ride. The lyrics exclaim, "Fuck you Fox, fuck you Disney / Sinister glossy landfill that makes you decay / Slip into the void for just ten bucks a month". It is clear that Zoog is not taking sides; no left, no right; just sheer animosity to the machine we're all stuck in. Zoog's aural assault continues with good songs such as 'SOMEONE ELSE'. This time Angelspit does not attack media or corporations but instead focuses on the individual which could include both you and I. The hip-hop influences come in as the lyrical delivery is clean cut and rhythmic while electroclash elements rip apart the track. The lyrics are harsh and honest from Zoog's perspective. They read, "Obedience is not enough / Humiliation is the final seal for your submission / We dream of storming Eden, but we're locked in a slum / I hate the person I'm trained to become". The fictional cyberpunk universe Zoog has built around the Angelspit legacy comes out in full force and yet they, in horrifying fashion, coincide with modern day events. 'ALL PUPPET NO MASTER' allows Zoog to show off what he can do when the beat is not going a million miles per hour. Rather than focusing on danceable beats or attitude driven electronic menaces, 'ALL PUPPET NO MASTER' is a back-to-roots, electro-industrial goody. What's also interesting about this song, especially with the creepy, spoken word and AI-sounding lyrical delivery, is that it seems to be from another perspective. This one from the Ignorance Cartel themselves. The voice speaks, "No one is going to save you / Agree with us or exile / No one is going to save you / Agree with us or die". There's even a line in the song that contradicts earlier sentiments in the album from 'EAT THE CHILDREN'. Going back to dark humor, the line reads, 'Contrary to popular belief / I don't eat children". Not only is this a swell way to connect the album to itself in full circle, but it's also a way for Angelspit to build the lore and myth around the album for those looking into it. There are not too many complaints I can type out about the album. The only song I took issue with was 'SPADE'. It did not hit right with me; it sounds like generic cinematic music for a sci-fi film or the main menu music in a video game. Well produced but nonetheless bland for my taste buds. I also wasn't as flawed with the album as I have been with prior Angelspit releases. That's not to say I didn't enjoy the album (for fuck's sake I'm giving a 7.5 out of 10) as it was a joyous ride to get through. But I would much rather listen to "Bang Operative" over "The Ignorance Cartel" for my Angelspit endeavors. There are times where I believe a concluding paragraph is necessary and times where I don't. But I don't think repeating myself and being redundant of all points made above are going to be worth my or your time. Instead I can end off the review by saying that fans of Angelspit and dirty electronic music alike are going to love the new album. Like many of his other releases, Zoog did not hold back in terms of physical merchandise available with the release of "The Ignorance Cartel". Regular and signed CDs are available, as well as a VHS tape containing videos for each track on the album. So, if you have your VCR available somewhere, dust it off and pop that bad boy right on in there. This review was commissioned through our Ko-fi page. Feel free to check it out for review, interview, and premiere opportunities.  450
Brutal Resonance

Angelspit - The Ignorance Cartel

7.5
"Good"
Released 2020 by Black Pill Red Pill
It is a dark humor conundrum to look at Angelspit's latest album "The Ignorance Cartel" and compare it to the recent world events that surrounded its release. Though never intended to coincide with the Covid-19 outbreak (its progress was started twelve months before the pandemic hit) it's hard to deviate the cyberpunk-rooted material, themes, and lyrics from all that's been said about and during the infestation. As Angelspit has explained through both press releases and on his Bandcamp page, the lockdown, the pandemic, mass unemployment, and a flood of disinformation pushed him to produce "The Ignorance Cartel" into darker and heavier turfs during a four-month post-production period. With an initial release date of October 20th, 2020, I am finally here to give the album a review and write-up.

The album's theme is spoken aloud just by taking a quick glance at the cover art. The red-suited menace (whether due to lighting or actual color) looks at me with an eerie smile, black metal inspired eye makeup, and white, glowing eyes. A dunce cap with symbols sit atop their head and I can only imagine that this is the ring-leader of the titular Ignorance Cartel the album spouts on about. As I always state, the cover art of an album never gives or takes points away from the album, but this is one Hell of a way to attract potential listeners to your music. 



What we find on the album, then, is what you would expect from Zoog Von Rock. Electronic rock inspired by industrial with various influences from outside sources such as glitch, hip hop, and punk. I was given a slice of that when I hit the play button for the first track 'EAT THE CHILDREN'. Dealing with the hypnotic effect big corporations bring out to quell the masses, the song itself has a danceable underlying beat with warning synths in the background like we're in an episode of The Twilight Zone. Accompanying crunchy guitars and background vocals help the song along for the ride. The lyrics exclaim, "Fuck you Fox, fuck you Disney / Sinister glossy landfill that makes you decay / Slip into the void for just ten bucks a month". It is clear that Zoog is not taking sides; no left, no right; just sheer animosity to the machine we're all stuck in. 

Zoog's aural assault continues with good songs such as 'SOMEONE ELSE'. This time Angelspit does not attack media or corporations but instead focuses on the individual which could include both you and I. The hip-hop influences come in as the lyrical delivery is clean cut and rhythmic while electroclash elements rip apart the track. The lyrics are harsh and honest from Zoog's perspective. They read, "Obedience is not enough / Humiliation is the final seal for your submission / We dream of storming Eden, but we're locked in a slum / I hate the person I'm trained to become". The fictional cyberpunk universe Zoog has built around the Angelspit legacy comes out in full force and yet they, in horrifying fashion, coincide with modern day events. 

'ALL PUPPET NO MASTER' allows Zoog to show off what he can do when the beat is not going a million miles per hour. Rather than focusing on danceable beats or attitude driven electronic menaces, 'ALL PUPPET NO MASTER' is a back-to-roots, electro-industrial goody. What's also interesting about this song, especially with the creepy, spoken word and AI-sounding lyrical delivery, is that it seems to be from another perspective. This one from the Ignorance Cartel themselves. The voice speaks, "No one is going to save you / Agree with us or exile / No one is going to save you / Agree with us or die". There's even a line in the song that contradicts earlier sentiments in the album from 'EAT THE CHILDREN'. Going back to dark humor, the line reads, 'Contrary to popular belief / I don't eat children". Not only is this a swell way to connect the album to itself in full circle, but it's also a way for Angelspit to build the lore and myth around the album for those looking into it. 

There are not too many complaints I can type out about the album. The only song I took issue with was 'SPADE'. It did not hit right with me; it sounds like generic cinematic music for a sci-fi film or the main menu music in a video game. Well produced but nonetheless bland for my taste buds. I also wasn't as flawed with the album as I have been with prior Angelspit releases. That's not to say I didn't enjoy the album (for fuck's sake I'm giving a 7.5 out of 10) as it was a joyous ride to get through. But I would much rather listen to "Bang Operative" over "The Ignorance Cartel" for my Angelspit endeavors. 

There are times where I believe a concluding paragraph is necessary and times where I don't. But I don't think repeating myself and being redundant of all points made above are going to be worth my or your time. Instead I can end off the review by saying that fans of Angelspit and dirty electronic music alike are going to love the new album. Like many of his other releases, Zoog did not hold back in terms of physical merchandise available with the release of "The Ignorance Cartel". Regular and signed CDs are available, as well as a VHS tape containing videos for each track on the album. So, if you have your VCR available somewhere, dust it off and pop that bad boy right on in there. 

This review was commissioned through our Ko-fi page. Feel free to check it out for review, interview, and premiere opportunities. 
Dec 12 2020

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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