Enemy Darkwave, EBM Aeon Rings I had my first encounter with Aeon Rings many years ago in NYC. Unknown to me at the time, I was fortunate to catch them open for the band I initially travelled from New Jersey to see. I can't even remember who the headliner was, perhaps The Hunt?  Their sound merged strong ties to synthpop with an underlaying grip of darkness. There was excitement mixed with anticipation from one track to the next. When the shows go as late as they do in NYC, you want the opening bands to be swift with their sets. That was not the case here. I wanted them to play longer. I saw them again at the Human Music Festival several years later in Newark NJ at the legendary QXTs.  Shortly after the Human Music Festival, Aeon Rings toured with Korine and Timecop 1983. I was certain more music would be released but things went quiet, then the dark days of Covid hit and they seemed to vanish into obscurity. Aeon Rings resurfaced years later with the release of Enemy on Negative Gain Productions. The album hits hard with a revamped sound that incorporates many elements Aeon Rings is known for such as precision synth work with intricate variations in song structure and the mesmerizing vocal melodies that evoke envy. So, what did Aeon Rings do to update their sound? For those already familiar with Aeon Rings sound, I can only imagine what went racing through their heads when the opening tracks played. "Fully Operational" and "Enemy" are absolutely mind-blowing by raising the power bar with some heavy EBM elements. "Fully Operational" is laced with melody, aggression and daring new vibe for an artist known for synthpop. There are foundational elements that have been built upon with a new outlook on structure and execution. "Fully Operational" is the signal flare that Aeon Rings is back and ready destroy with fiery variation and diversity in sound. "Enemy" continues in the same vein as "Fully Operational" with more EBM pummeling paired with Davey's infectious voice. The vocals on "Enemy" even hint to extreme metal for a moment with a foreboding guttural gruffness that adds a dark charm to the track. "Closet Case", "IO",  "Lover" and "Adam Hadem" retain the EBM influence, but that often becomes ancillary to the vocal execution. The arrangements showcase the range and delivery that speak to the maturation of sound from the early days of Floods to where we are now with Enemy. "Lover" slowly builds up and rips with more very aggressive vocals and throbbing EBM beats to back the viciousness of that segment while "Adam Hadem" stays very monotone with a more straight EBM sound. "Body To Body"  employs a robotic filter on the chorus that has arcs to the late 80's to select industrial acts on New Zone or BOY Records. "Shallow End", "Slow Choke" and "All Mine" favor a more restrained execution. These offerings have a strong vocal appeal complimented with layers sounds that give each track its unique statement. "All Mine" really stands out with a dreamy perhaps even romantic feel. By the time we are ready to close final chapter of Enemy, the concluding routine reveals the wonderful yet very dark "September Sober". This track chills the blood with a very slow tempo set a very personal subject as the title reveals. Outside of a select few tracks, the album leans more towards synthpop as the undercurrent delivers a healthy dose of EBM vibes carefully woven into the fabric of Aeon Rings' music. The new feel is not disparate at all, it  just injects more flavor from years of experiences and the natural progression of the artist's influences. The album is available from Negative Gain Productions. Click here to order the CD/LP versions 450
Brutal Resonance

Aeon Rings - Enemy

8.0
"Great"
Released 2022 by Negative Gain Productions
I had my first encounter with Aeon Rings many years ago in NYC. Unknown to me at the time, I was fortunate to catch them open for the band I initially travelled from New Jersey to see. I can't even remember who the headliner was, perhaps The Hunt?  Their sound merged strong ties to synthpop with an underlaying grip of darkness. There was excitement mixed with anticipation from one track to the next. When the shows go as late as they do in NYC, you want the opening bands to be swift with their sets. That was not the case here. I wanted them to play longer. I saw them again at the Human Music Festival several years later in Newark NJ at the legendary QXTs.  Shortly after the Human Music Festival, Aeon Rings toured with Korine and Timecop 1983. I was certain more music would be released but things went quiet, then the dark days of Covid hit and they seemed to vanish into obscurity. 

Aeon Rings resurfaced years later with the release of Enemy on Negative Gain Productions. The album hits hard with a revamped sound that incorporates many elements Aeon Rings is known for such as precision synth work with intricate variations in song structure and the mesmerizing vocal melodies that evoke envy. So, what did Aeon Rings do to update their sound? 


For those already familiar with Aeon Rings sound, I can only imagine what went racing through their heads when the opening tracks played. "Fully Operational" and "Enemy" are absolutely mind-blowing by raising the power bar with some heavy EBM elements. "Fully Operational" is laced with melody, aggression and daring new vibe for an artist known for synthpop. There are foundational elements that have been built upon with a new outlook on structure and execution. "Fully Operational" is the signal flare that Aeon Rings is back and ready destroy with fiery variation and diversity in sound.

"Enemy" continues in the same vein as "Fully Operational" with more EBM pummeling paired with Davey's infectious voice. The vocals on "Enemy" even hint to extreme metal for a moment with a foreboding guttural gruffness that adds a dark charm to the track. "Closet Case", "IO",  "Lover" and "Adam Hadem" retain the EBM influence, but that often becomes ancillary to the vocal execution. The arrangements showcase the range and delivery that speak to the maturation of sound from the early days of Floods to where we are now with Enemy. "Lover" slowly builds up and rips with more very aggressive vocals and throbbing EBM beats to back the viciousness of that segment while "Adam Hadem" stays very monotone with a more straight EBM sound. "Body To Body"  employs a robotic filter on the chorus that has arcs to the late 80's to select industrial acts on New Zone or BOY Records. "Shallow End", "Slow Choke" and "All Mine" favor a more restrained execution. These offerings have a strong vocal appeal complimented with layers sounds that give each track its unique statement. "All Mine" really stands out with a dreamy perhaps even romantic feel. By the time we are ready to close final chapter of Enemy, the concluding routine reveals the wonderful yet very dark "September Sober". This track chills the blood with a very slow tempo set a very personal subject as the title reveals. 

Outside of a select few tracks, the album leans more towards synthpop as the undercurrent delivers a healthy dose of EBM vibes carefully woven into the fabric of Aeon Rings' music. The new feel is not disparate at all, it  just injects more flavor from years of experiences and the natural progression of the artist's influences.

The album is available from Negative Gain Productions. Click here to order the CD/LP versions


Nov 02 2022

Luke Jacobs

info@brutalresonance.com
Reviewer since 2012

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Started in spring 2009, Brutal Resonance quickly grew from a Swedish based netzine into an established International zine of the highest standard.

We cover genres like Synthpop, EBM, Industrial, Dark Ambient, Neofolk, Darkwave, Noise and all their sub- and similar genres.

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