Every once in a while I'll post something on Facebook such as, "Show me what you got and I might review it." This time I did a thing where I reviewed the four artists who got the most likes in the comments. Originally I wanted to only do three, but then I moved on and did four as the fourth was neck and neck with the others. So, four small reviews for a couple of bands. One I absolutely loved, one I really enjoyed, one was mediocre, and one I'll never have to listen to again so long as I have a choice. 

Horskh : Body : 9 out of 10
I saw a couple of comments mentioning how Horskh is such a compliment to that of NIN and KMFDM. And, yeah, I suppose I can agree on account of how they’re all in the industrial rock and industrial metal spectrum. However, I’m gonna go out on a limb here and say that everything that Horskh has accomplished on this album is better than the entire output of KMFDM and NIN combined. This isn’t me throwing shade or anything like that, this is me talking about my personal preferences as I never really got into NIN or KMFDM all that much. What we’re provided here is a non-stop ballad of machine industrial, from the clean and pumping percussion to the glitchy and sample filled breakdowns. It’s industrial at its finest with Horskh honing their craft like a master blacksmith sharpening a blade. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve had a workout session this week as I blasted the rapid fire beats of ‘BODY BUILDING’ through my earbuds, or how ‘TURBINE ON’ gave me a sweet stress relief after work due to the energetic and aggressive nature of the track. Mingling flesh with machine and becoming so much more. It’s a phenomenal construction from start to finish and I can’t wait to have a vinyl sitting on my shelf in the near future. 


Pilgrims of Yearning : Hadal : 7 out of 10
This little darkwave / post-punk EP strode past me in 2022 but I’m lucky enough that founding member Juls Garat commented on our Facebook post (and luckier that so many people voted for it). From the get go with ‘La Mar’ I’m greeted with a moody atmosphere thanks to deep backing synths and an equally unforgettable bass guitar. Garat’s vocals are mystifying throughout the song, echoing off into the background and being clean sung when necessary, emphasizing and becoming a ghost as necessary. ‘Tides’ is a bit messy in the mix as I think that her vocals could have been brought a bit more up front as I can’t really hear what she’s trying to sing. Other than that, it’s a stark contrast to the opening song with a bit more of a dark pop flair to it. I’d say I have the same problem with the vocals on ‘Rivers’ as I did with ‘Tides’, but overall that’s another fun goth adjacent jam. The final song on the EP breaks a bit into the punk part of post-punk with excellent use of the drum machine, a rapid fire shot of music straight down the line while still maintaining identity. Overall, a pretty fun EP. A small amount of work to be done to make the music even better, but a damn solid start. 


Sven Phalanx & Eleven-FX : The Battle Begins : 6 out of 10
This is going to be difficult to review not because it’s terrible or even all that grand, but that I can’t really find too many words to describe it due to the rather generic approach the artists have taken with the song. It sounds like a harder dance single with a punchy bassline and a bit of a futuristic tone. I suppose this can be considered an environmental song more than anything, as I’m sure it will get the dance floor moving, it’ll provide a good pump at the gym, so on and so forth. But for listening pleasure, not really. I couldn’t see myself throwing this on in my daily routine. Well produced, energetic, but bland and a stock song that I could see any DJ throwing about. 


Shinigami IND : Rage Machine : 3 out of 10
First thing that I thought when I hit the play button on this album was, “Oh God, no, please.” This is an aggrotech, harsh EBM album that’s attempting to call back to the heyday of harsh EBM which was a decade or more ago at this point. But it fails at every attempt to do so. The vocals are completely muddled out, as if someone’s trying to scream whilst their mouth is filled with a gallon of water. The vocals are also buried beneath the beat. Meanwhile the beat is nothing crazy to talk about, either; peaks a bit too much and overpowers anything the vocals are doing making for an awful mix. The beats themselves range from poor to average, without anything ever moving past that point. I think the title track has a decent beat to it, sounding like something that could be played in a Need For Speed game, but the vocals are present throughout most of the track and ruin any fun I’m having with it. But then you have other songs such as ‘No More’ which sounds as if it wasn’t mixed or mastered properly and I’m stuck here listening to it. It’s a pretty bad album and one that I can’t recommend to anyone.  

Reviews From the Facebook Comments: Featuring Horskh, Pilgrims of Yearning, Shinigami IND, Sven Phalanx & Eleven-FX
June 2, 2024
Brutal Resonance

Reviews From the Facebook Comments: Featuring Horskh, Pilgrims of Yearning, Shinigami IND, Sven Phalanx & Eleven-FX

Every once in a while I'll post something on Facebook such as, "Show me what you got and I might review it." This time I did a thing where I reviewed the four artists who got the most likes in the comments. Originally I wanted to only do three, but then I moved on and did four as the fourth was neck and neck with the others. So, four small reviews for a couple of bands. One I absolutely loved, one I really enjoyed, one was mediocre, and one I'll never have to listen to again so long as I have a choice. 

Horskh : Body : 9 out of 10
I saw a couple of comments mentioning how Horskh is such a compliment to that of NIN and KMFDM. And, yeah, I suppose I can agree on account of how they’re all in the industrial rock and industrial metal spectrum. However, I’m gonna go out on a limb here and say that everything that Horskh has accomplished on this album is better than the entire output of KMFDM and NIN combined. This isn’t me throwing shade or anything like that, this is me talking about my personal preferences as I never really got into NIN or KMFDM all that much. What we’re provided here is a non-stop ballad of machine industrial, from the clean and pumping percussion to the glitchy and sample filled breakdowns. It’s industrial at its finest with Horskh honing their craft like a master blacksmith sharpening a blade. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve had a workout session this week as I blasted the rapid fire beats of ‘BODY BUILDING’ through my earbuds, or how ‘TURBINE ON’ gave me a sweet stress relief after work due to the energetic and aggressive nature of the track. Mingling flesh with machine and becoming so much more. It’s a phenomenal construction from start to finish and I can’t wait to have a vinyl sitting on my shelf in the near future. 


Pilgrims of Yearning : Hadal : 7 out of 10
This little darkwave / post-punk EP strode past me in 2022 but I’m lucky enough that founding member Juls Garat commented on our Facebook post (and luckier that so many people voted for it). From the get go with ‘La Mar’ I’m greeted with a moody atmosphere thanks to deep backing synths and an equally unforgettable bass guitar. Garat’s vocals are mystifying throughout the song, echoing off into the background and being clean sung when necessary, emphasizing and becoming a ghost as necessary. ‘Tides’ is a bit messy in the mix as I think that her vocals could have been brought a bit more up front as I can’t really hear what she’s trying to sing. Other than that, it’s a stark contrast to the opening song with a bit more of a dark pop flair to it. I’d say I have the same problem with the vocals on ‘Rivers’ as I did with ‘Tides’, but overall that’s another fun goth adjacent jam. The final song on the EP breaks a bit into the punk part of post-punk with excellent use of the drum machine, a rapid fire shot of music straight down the line while still maintaining identity. Overall, a pretty fun EP. A small amount of work to be done to make the music even better, but a damn solid start. 


Sven Phalanx & Eleven-FX : The Battle Begins : 6 out of 10
This is going to be difficult to review not because it’s terrible or even all that grand, but that I can’t really find too many words to describe it due to the rather generic approach the artists have taken with the song. It sounds like a harder dance single with a punchy bassline and a bit of a futuristic tone. I suppose this can be considered an environmental song more than anything, as I’m sure it will get the dance floor moving, it’ll provide a good pump at the gym, so on and so forth. But for listening pleasure, not really. I couldn’t see myself throwing this on in my daily routine. Well produced, energetic, but bland and a stock song that I could see any DJ throwing about. 


Shinigami IND : Rage Machine : 3 out of 10
First thing that I thought when I hit the play button on this album was, “Oh God, no, please.” This is an aggrotech, harsh EBM album that’s attempting to call back to the heyday of harsh EBM which was a decade or more ago at this point. But it fails at every attempt to do so. The vocals are completely muddled out, as if someone’s trying to scream whilst their mouth is filled with a gallon of water. The vocals are also buried beneath the beat. Meanwhile the beat is nothing crazy to talk about, either; peaks a bit too much and overpowers anything the vocals are doing making for an awful mix. The beats themselves range from poor to average, without anything ever moving past that point. I think the title track has a decent beat to it, sounding like something that could be played in a Need For Speed game, but the vocals are present throughout most of the track and ruin any fun I’m having with it. But then you have other songs such as ‘No More’ which sounds as if it wasn’t mixed or mastered properly and I’m stuck here listening to it. It’s a pretty bad album and one that I can’t recommend to anyone.  

Jun 02 2024

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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Started in spring 2009, Brutal Resonance quickly grew from a Swedish based netzine into an established International zine of the highest standard.

We cover genres like Synthpop, EBM, Industrial, Dark Ambient, Neofolk, Darkwave, Noise and all their sub- and similar genres.

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