Worms of the Earth - Netjer
Dark Ambient, Martial Industrial Whenever Worms of the Earth releases a new album I understand that it is going to be a deep, occult and ritualistic trip into some pantheon of Gods that I've either never explored or researched myself. Sure, the middle eastern influences present within the artist's music, imagery, and themes were spoken of and taught in my high school years but that was more or less a pass over on what requires years and years of study to fully understand. Dan Barrett, the curator of Worms of the Earth's dark ambiance, is an electronic sorcerer and fully grasps the mentality needed to immerse and teach the listener of his own findings and examinations into another culture and theology. While I could attempt to half-ass explain what the project's new album "Netjer" is about, I would recommend hopping on over to Worms' Bandcamp page and reading the short paragraph of text located underneath the track listing - followed up by any further readings you may want to do yourself. 

What I shan't glimpse over is the wonderful music and sudden ritual I found myself enveloped in as soon as I hit the play button on "Netjer". Worms of the Earth's output consistently comes in two tones; there are the chilling albums of what some would call evil spiritual forces (though what I call the best meditative music in the world) such as "Azal'ucel" and "Sitra Achra", and then the middle eastern influenced works such as "Anagami". "Netjer" finds itself allocated to the middle eastern range of albums.

What I was treated with on the album was a plethora of songs featuring wind instruments and strings from a far off land; ancient and forgotten studies being brought to the threshold of the new world, and a meeting with forces of omnipotent potential that they are Lovecraftian in their nature. My favorite song on the album would have to be the last, 'The Spell To Evoke The Amenti'. This little over sixteen minute exercise travels from drawn out drones to cryptic rhythms thought of only in the great pyramids of Egypt. Other stand out tracks include the first song 'He Who Traverses The Duat'; this opening song sucked me in and gripped me thanks to the fluttery flute and the gorgeous hums throughout the song. 'The Trial of Akh' is also another wonderful expression of the synthetic meeting the natural; a darkly esoteric celebration of something most would fear to approach. 

The only two songs on the album that I could not get into were 'The Hidden Pyramid, Where The Astral Is Given Form' and 'Neb Medu Netjer'. For what they are - which are drone tracks mixed with backdropped ancient whispers and an array of noises / sounds of mystifying proportions - the tracks are not bad. They are very well produced as has come to be expected of Worms of the Earth, but I did find myself thinking they were a bit bland in accordance to Worms' normal output. I have heard many songs like these two from other dark ambient and drone producers and it just does not seem as concentrated as the rest of the songs on the album. Perhaps this is still an underhanded compliment, though; Worms of the Earth's output is so stellar that a typical drone song can be picked out of the bunch. But do not let this minor complaint stop you from enjoying the rest of the album as it is something to die for. 

Whenever I finish digesting a Worms of the Earth album I never walk away from it disliking it; instead I wrestle it in my head trying to see how my I enjoyed it. Each one of Worms' works are phenomenal; they can be used for spiritual study and to further your own understanding of powers, beings, and ancient figures. For me, I use these albums as meditative pieces for when I need a break from modern life. "Netjer", while perhaps not my favorite album from the Washington based producer, still holds up and has given me moments of rest throughout the past month and a half of listening. The gems on the album will be going into my standard playlists forever and again. 
4
Brutal Resonance

Worms of the Earth - Netjer

8.0
"Great"
Released 2019 by Zazen Sounds
Whenever Worms of the Earth releases a new album I understand that it is going to be a deep, occult and ritualistic trip into some pantheon of Gods that I've either never explored or researched myself. Sure, the middle eastern influences present within the artist's music, imagery, and themes were spoken of and taught in my high school years but that was more or less a pass over on what requires years and years of study to fully understand. Dan Barrett, the curator of Worms of the Earth's dark ambiance, is an electronic sorcerer and fully grasps the mentality needed to immerse and teach the listener of his own findings and examinations into another culture and theology. While I could attempt to half-ass explain what the project's new album "Netjer" is about, I would recommend hopping on over to Worms' Bandcamp page and reading the short paragraph of text located underneath the track listing - followed up by any further readings you may want to do yourself. 

What I shan't glimpse over is the wonderful music and sudden ritual I found myself enveloped in as soon as I hit the play button on "Netjer". Worms of the Earth's output consistently comes in two tones; there are the chilling albums of what some would call evil spiritual forces (though what I call the best meditative music in the world) such as "Azal'ucel" and "Sitra Achra", and then the middle eastern influenced works such as "Anagami". "Netjer" finds itself allocated to the middle eastern range of albums.

What I was treated with on the album was a plethora of songs featuring wind instruments and strings from a far off land; ancient and forgotten studies being brought to the threshold of the new world, and a meeting with forces of omnipotent potential that they are Lovecraftian in their nature. My favorite song on the album would have to be the last, 'The Spell To Evoke The Amenti'. This little over sixteen minute exercise travels from drawn out drones to cryptic rhythms thought of only in the great pyramids of Egypt. Other stand out tracks include the first song 'He Who Traverses The Duat'; this opening song sucked me in and gripped me thanks to the fluttery flute and the gorgeous hums throughout the song. 'The Trial of Akh' is also another wonderful expression of the synthetic meeting the natural; a darkly esoteric celebration of something most would fear to approach. 

The only two songs on the album that I could not get into were 'The Hidden Pyramid, Where The Astral Is Given Form' and 'Neb Medu Netjer'. For what they are - which are drone tracks mixed with backdropped ancient whispers and an array of noises / sounds of mystifying proportions - the tracks are not bad. They are very well produced as has come to be expected of Worms of the Earth, but I did find myself thinking they were a bit bland in accordance to Worms' normal output. I have heard many songs like these two from other dark ambient and drone producers and it just does not seem as concentrated as the rest of the songs on the album. Perhaps this is still an underhanded compliment, though; Worms of the Earth's output is so stellar that a typical drone song can be picked out of the bunch. But do not let this minor complaint stop you from enjoying the rest of the album as it is something to die for. 

Whenever I finish digesting a Worms of the Earth album I never walk away from it disliking it; instead I wrestle it in my head trying to see how my I enjoyed it. Each one of Worms' works are phenomenal; they can be used for spiritual study and to further your own understanding of powers, beings, and ancient figures. For me, I use these albums as meditative pieces for when I need a break from modern life. "Netjer", while perhaps not my favorite album from the Washington based producer, still holds up and has given me moments of rest throughout the past month and a half of listening. The gems on the album will be going into my standard playlists forever and again. 
Nov 23 2019

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

Share this review

Facebook
Twitter
Google+
0
Shares

Buy this release

Bandcamp

Related articles

E.S.A. - 'That Beast'

Review, May 06 2018

Worms of the Earth

Interview, Nov 16 2013

Shortly about us

Started in spring 2009, Brutal Resonance quickly grew from a Swedish based netzine into an established International zine of the highest standard.

We cover genres like Synthpop, EBM, Industrial, Dark Ambient, Neofolk, Darkwave, Noise and all their sub- and similar genres.

© Brutal Resonance 2009-2016
Designed by and developed by Head of Mímir 2016