Three Winters - Atrocites EP
Electronics, Synthpop Coming from Norway hails a trio of men coming from various other projects based under the industrial belt who have joined hands and forces together to create Three Winters, which can easily be described as being a harder form of synthpop. What they have released here, however, is not a full release; rather, it is an EP showcasing of what shall be dawning upon the listener when they decide to pick up their first official album (whenever that may be, as nothing more has been announced of it). And, well within this EP do I find myself feeling a gaggle of excitement for future releases under the Three Winters name.

I mean, to explain what to expect on the album, we are presented with three original tracks with four remixes . And, as a first, let me get through the original tracks. Atrocites starts off the album, being the title track, and leads a steady beat and tempo, not too fast, but very moody and cinematic at the same time. It was a grand pleasure to listen to, and had me stuck on it from the start. At the Centre of Dystopia picks up the beat ever so slightly, and works on the synths greatly. There are some whispering vocals, definitely distorted, and sounding like that of a ghost. Again, I was impressed by the sound of this song. And, the final track on the EP as well as the last non-remix on the album was Aeon Surveillance. It surely plays off as quite the goodbye song, as something that just asks you to ask yourself what you have just gone through. And it was pretty good, especially with the slow beginning turning into a more fruitful end.

And, now, however, we get into the remixes. I cannot say that of the four remixes that any of them were better than the original tracks. The Pseen mix of At the Centre of Dystopia was enjoyable, however, taking away the bass from the original and using the synths to create a more spooky like atmosphere in the song did not work for me too well. After this, we are presented with three different mixes of Atrocities.

The Aymeric Thomas didn't really seem like it tried to do much on it's own other than throw in a few more electronics and digital effects while keeping the same pace of the original song for the most part. The Mister mix was decent, but seemed to be a little too low quality for myself. Perhaps that's how it was supposed to sound, but I could not get into it. And, finally, the last mix, the Th. Tot mix, again, seemed to not really change up the song too much, and I was disappointed with it.

And, there you have it, folks. This is my opinion on the release and I am sticking with it. I absolutely adored the original tracks a lot; as I said, I was hooked upon first listen of the title song, Atrocities. Even as I finish typing this out at the final few seconds, I find myself listening to the song again. And, well, you should all check this out; it's a grand effort, and I find no remorse in listening to it.
4
Brutal Resonance

Three Winters - Atrocites EP

8.5
"Great"
N/A
Electroracle
Released 2013 by Beläten
Coming from Norway hails a trio of men coming from various other projects based under the industrial belt who have joined hands and forces together to create Three Winters, which can easily be described as being a harder form of synthpop. What they have released here, however, is not a full release; rather, it is an EP showcasing of what shall be dawning upon the listener when they decide to pick up their first official album (whenever that may be, as nothing more has been announced of it). And, well within this EP do I find myself feeling a gaggle of excitement for future releases under the Three Winters name.

I mean, to explain what to expect on the album, we are presented with three original tracks with four remixes . And, as a first, let me get through the original tracks. Atrocites starts off the album, being the title track, and leads a steady beat and tempo, not too fast, but very moody and cinematic at the same time. It was a grand pleasure to listen to, and had me stuck on it from the start. At the Centre of Dystopia picks up the beat ever so slightly, and works on the synths greatly. There are some whispering vocals, definitely distorted, and sounding like that of a ghost. Again, I was impressed by the sound of this song. And, the final track on the EP as well as the last non-remix on the album was Aeon Surveillance. It surely plays off as quite the goodbye song, as something that just asks you to ask yourself what you have just gone through. And it was pretty good, especially with the slow beginning turning into a more fruitful end.

And, now, however, we get into the remixes. I cannot say that of the four remixes that any of them were better than the original tracks. The Pseen mix of At the Centre of Dystopia was enjoyable, however, taking away the bass from the original and using the synths to create a more spooky like atmosphere in the song did not work for me too well. After this, we are presented with three different mixes of Atrocities.

The Aymeric Thomas didn't really seem like it tried to do much on it's own other than throw in a few more electronics and digital effects while keeping the same pace of the original song for the most part. The Mister mix was decent, but seemed to be a little too low quality for myself. Perhaps that's how it was supposed to sound, but I could not get into it. And, finally, the last mix, the Th. Tot mix, again, seemed to not really change up the song too much, and I was disappointed with it.

And, there you have it, folks. This is my opinion on the release and I am sticking with it. I absolutely adored the original tracks a lot; as I said, I was hooked upon first listen of the title song, Atrocities. Even as I finish typing this out at the final few seconds, I find myself listening to the song again. And, well, you should all check this out; it's a grand effort, and I find no remorse in listening to it. Sep 15 2013

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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