Street Sects - End Position
Noise, Industrial "Tomorrow I will do it. I will cash my paycheck and I will buy the gun. I am tired and I can't take anymore."



Too many acts try to take the darker than thou art route but usually sing about the same religious or political context every single other musician in the world has spoken about. What they boil down to are a bunch of whiny Neanderthals who - although they may have talent - brag about the problems in society without ever really doing anything about it other than saying, "Fuck the man," via internet forums. They cease to be artists with powerful messages and just become a joke. Every once in a while bands such as Street Sects step in and deliver hate and fucked up concepts that come from a deep, inside and personal disgust with the world surrounding themselves. 

The last time I spoke of Street Sects was back in August of 2014; if you missed out on these two Austin, Texas based industrial/punk/noise producers you should go back and check out their discography. Their previous songs sound much, much different than how they're presented in the now. Both their previous EPs Broken Windows, Sunken Ceilings and The Morning After The Night We Raped Death are noise fueled industrial chaos with an attitude only punk could describe. Both prior EPs were part of the Gentrification Series, a planned album series that would take place in five parts. 

Nonetheless I'm proud of these two Texas based musicians for being able to get End Position out on The Flenser. The label was able to provide a special, limited edition package for the band as well as better mixing and production than from prior efforts. The result is a definitive Street Sects experience filled with all of the misanthropic and hard to endure content that I fell in love with from when I first started listening to the band. 

Street Sects extreme music is brought to life on End Position starting off with 'And I Grew into Ribbons'. Drums, chaos, distorted screams and scratches are all present on this track. Also, when I said in the previous paragraph that the production on the album is stellar I truly do mean that; comparing End Position and the previous EPs is like night and day. 'Copper in the Slots' struts through paces of absolute anarchy and complacent and synth backed calmer moments. But, the fact is that this is coming from a violent mind so every corner you turn there is always an ominous presence. 

'In Defense of Resentment' had the noise and anger we all love and endure but had more harmonic and sung out vocals. I mean, the shouting came later in the song but I was still in a bit of a shock going through this one getting atoned with the new era of Street Sects. 'Featherweight Hate' had a fast paced rhythm to it with plenty of lovely synth work rolling along it, while 'Our Lesions' had a deconstructed sound about it as if it was a mind unraveling past the breaking point. 

Both 'Victims of Nostalgia' and 'Black Din' sounded more like a song that belonged on the Gentrification EPs and turned out to be two of the hardest songs on the album. While 'Feigning Familiarity' slowed down the pace, the sound was undeniably that of Street Sects nurture, 'Collared, Kept' brought forth more hardened noise. The longest song on the album 'If This is What Passes for Living' is also the final one and appears to be the most lyrically heavy album on the album. There is a huge, somber pause in the music that starts around the two and a half minute mark with ambient and cinematic noises, as well as a panicked breath. When the music does kick back in, it's industrial sludge at its finest, and the song ends off with a creepy sample from a small child. 

Some people cannot stand the ugliness of this world and turn their heads in it; they create a false utopia in their head and think everything is okay. Others try to embrace it only to find themselves too weak to deal with the horrible, horrible reality of everyday life. Street Sects, however, bask in these hideous and unsightly occurrences and are able to make chaotic filth for all of us to take pleasure in. It's fucking great music and noise, the type that will make you question your very own existence and thoughts yet will also make you want to end something - be it another human being or just a random object. End Position is like a fire injected in your veins that can only be put out through an equally morbid and grotesque act. 
4
Brutal Resonance

Street Sects - End Position

8.0
"Great"
N/A
Electroracle
Spotify
Released 2016 by The Flenser
"Tomorrow I will do it. I will cash my paycheck and I will buy the gun. I am tired and I can't take anymore."



Too many acts try to take the darker than thou art route but usually sing about the same religious or political context every single other musician in the world has spoken about. What they boil down to are a bunch of whiny Neanderthals who - although they may have talent - brag about the problems in society without ever really doing anything about it other than saying, "Fuck the man," via internet forums. They cease to be artists with powerful messages and just become a joke. Every once in a while bands such as Street Sects step in and deliver hate and fucked up concepts that come from a deep, inside and personal disgust with the world surrounding themselves. 

The last time I spoke of Street Sects was back in August of 2014; if you missed out on these two Austin, Texas based industrial/punk/noise producers you should go back and check out their discography. Their previous songs sound much, much different than how they're presented in the now. Both their previous EPs Broken Windows, Sunken Ceilings and The Morning After The Night We Raped Death are noise fueled industrial chaos with an attitude only punk could describe. Both prior EPs were part of the Gentrification Series, a planned album series that would take place in five parts. 

Nonetheless I'm proud of these two Texas based musicians for being able to get End Position out on The Flenser. The label was able to provide a special, limited edition package for the band as well as better mixing and production than from prior efforts. The result is a definitive Street Sects experience filled with all of the misanthropic and hard to endure content that I fell in love with from when I first started listening to the band. 

Street Sects extreme music is brought to life on End Position starting off with 'And I Grew into Ribbons'. Drums, chaos, distorted screams and scratches are all present on this track. Also, when I said in the previous paragraph that the production on the album is stellar I truly do mean that; comparing End Position and the previous EPs is like night and day. 'Copper in the Slots' struts through paces of absolute anarchy and complacent and synth backed calmer moments. But, the fact is that this is coming from a violent mind so every corner you turn there is always an ominous presence. 

'In Defense of Resentment' had the noise and anger we all love and endure but had more harmonic and sung out vocals. I mean, the shouting came later in the song but I was still in a bit of a shock going through this one getting atoned with the new era of Street Sects. 'Featherweight Hate' had a fast paced rhythm to it with plenty of lovely synth work rolling along it, while 'Our Lesions' had a deconstructed sound about it as if it was a mind unraveling past the breaking point. 

Both 'Victims of Nostalgia' and 'Black Din' sounded more like a song that belonged on the Gentrification EPs and turned out to be two of the hardest songs on the album. While 'Feigning Familiarity' slowed down the pace, the sound was undeniably that of Street Sects nurture, 'Collared, Kept' brought forth more hardened noise. The longest song on the album 'If This is What Passes for Living' is also the final one and appears to be the most lyrically heavy album on the album. There is a huge, somber pause in the music that starts around the two and a half minute mark with ambient and cinematic noises, as well as a panicked breath. When the music does kick back in, it's industrial sludge at its finest, and the song ends off with a creepy sample from a small child. 

Some people cannot stand the ugliness of this world and turn their heads in it; they create a false utopia in their head and think everything is okay. Others try to embrace it only to find themselves too weak to deal with the horrible, horrible reality of everyday life. Street Sects, however, bask in these hideous and unsightly occurrences and are able to make chaotic filth for all of us to take pleasure in. It's fucking great music and noise, the type that will make you question your very own existence and thoughts yet will also make you want to end something - be it another human being or just a random object. End Position is like a fire injected in your veins that can only be put out through an equally morbid and grotesque act. 
Sep 03 2016

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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