Shatoo - Floodlights
Synthpop In the dawn of 1987, the Norwegian synthpop group Shatoo was formed by a group of 15 to 17 year old boys. And, it's funny, too, because they were able to top music charts with their debut single, Overload, and achieved much more with huge hits such as Santorini and Dangertown. But, just as the fun began, it also ended in 1990 to much depreciation from fans.

However, time has passed, and now they're back in full form to blend their 80s sound into modern music. So far, there have been two comeback singles, one of them being Nothing That I Wouldn't Do and Floodlights. A third single will be on its way, and, to add onto their bigger plans, rereleases of A True Story, Life, and Tranquility will be pressed on CD. Not only that, but there is an as of yet unnamed full length album in the works. So, you have a lot to be excited for.

However, back in December of 2013, this four man band released the Floodlights EP which not only features remixes by Technomancer and Angst Pop, but also features reworkings of old songs, as well as their two latest singles.

As such, the EP starts off with the song of the same name, Floodlights. And, hell, if I'm not being brought back in a time capsule, then someone needs to punch me in the face and get me out of the eighties. The signature sound of the band still maintains a heavy hold on the era of three decades ago. The sound is very crisp and clear, and really hits nicely. The bass is deep enough to hold this song as a nice dance friendly track.

Now, the next song, Nothing That I Wouldn't Do, goes more in the direction of smooth synthpop with a faster beat. The chimes in it along with the bassline still hold true to the eighties, which is something I was greatly appreciative of.

One of their bigger hits from when they were active oh so many years ago also got an extended remix, and that song would be Dangertown. At seven minutes, I wasn't too fond of the main opening vocals, as they stuttered really bad with effects, and were annoying to get through. However, once the main chorus broke through, it sounded absolutely fantastic.

And then there were the four remixes involved. Technomancer took a stab at Floodlights, adding more electronics and a bit of a faster pace. When the chorus came along the song quieted down some, which was a bit disappointing for I was waiting a really powerful beat to shine through with it. It didn't really happen. Nonetheless, this remix was fairly good.

Now, the next three remixes all were remixed by Angst Pop and featured Technomancer. The first of which to appear was a remix of Dangertown. Each remix brought about by these two still hold high in the eighties aspect, and now I feel like going to a club to bust out some disco moves.

And, well, if this is just a sneak peak at what's to come from this Norwegian band, I am more than prepared for more from where it came form. I absolutely adored this album and its gigantic throwback to the eighties. I hunger for more, and I suppose I'll just have to hold over by delving into more eighties centric music for the time being.

4
Brutal Resonance

Shatoo - Floodlights

8.0
"Great"
N/A
Electroracle
Spotify
Released off label 2013
In the dawn of 1987, the Norwegian synthpop group Shatoo was formed by a group of 15 to 17 year old boys. And, it's funny, too, because they were able to top music charts with their debut single, Overload, and achieved much more with huge hits such as Santorini and Dangertown. But, just as the fun began, it also ended in 1990 to much depreciation from fans.

However, time has passed, and now they're back in full form to blend their 80s sound into modern music. So far, there have been two comeback singles, one of them being Nothing That I Wouldn't Do and Floodlights. A third single will be on its way, and, to add onto their bigger plans, rereleases of A True Story, Life, and Tranquility will be pressed on CD. Not only that, but there is an as of yet unnamed full length album in the works. So, you have a lot to be excited for.

However, back in December of 2013, this four man band released the Floodlights EP which not only features remixes by Technomancer and Angst Pop, but also features reworkings of old songs, as well as their two latest singles.

As such, the EP starts off with the song of the same name, Floodlights. And, hell, if I'm not being brought back in a time capsule, then someone needs to punch me in the face and get me out of the eighties. The signature sound of the band still maintains a heavy hold on the era of three decades ago. The sound is very crisp and clear, and really hits nicely. The bass is deep enough to hold this song as a nice dance friendly track.

Now, the next song, Nothing That I Wouldn't Do, goes more in the direction of smooth synthpop with a faster beat. The chimes in it along with the bassline still hold true to the eighties, which is something I was greatly appreciative of.

One of their bigger hits from when they were active oh so many years ago also got an extended remix, and that song would be Dangertown. At seven minutes, I wasn't too fond of the main opening vocals, as they stuttered really bad with effects, and were annoying to get through. However, once the main chorus broke through, it sounded absolutely fantastic.

And then there were the four remixes involved. Technomancer took a stab at Floodlights, adding more electronics and a bit of a faster pace. When the chorus came along the song quieted down some, which was a bit disappointing for I was waiting a really powerful beat to shine through with it. It didn't really happen. Nonetheless, this remix was fairly good.

Now, the next three remixes all were remixed by Angst Pop and featured Technomancer. The first of which to appear was a remix of Dangertown. Each remix brought about by these two still hold high in the eighties aspect, and now I feel like going to a club to bust out some disco moves.

And, well, if this is just a sneak peak at what's to come from this Norwegian band, I am more than prepared for more from where it came form. I absolutely adored this album and its gigantic throwback to the eighties. I hunger for more, and I suppose I'll just have to hold over by delving into more eighties centric music for the time being.

Jun 08 2014

Off label

Official release released by the artist themselves without the backing of a label.

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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