Seraphim System - Automaton Assisted Annihilation
Aggrotech, Industrial What do you get when you have a gigantic hard-on for classic sci-fi films such as Terminator 2: Judgement Day, enjoy the wobbles of dubstep and the grit of industrial, yet all you want to be is a nihilistic sarcastic fuck while ironically enjoying life as much as you can? You get Seraphim System, the industrial project that recently played at Resistanz 2016 and was absolutely loved by the crowd. Handshakes, free beer, and signature requests all followed his set which included his remix of the T2 theme song. But before all that, there was November 2015, and in that normally thankful albeit cold month, Seraphim System's fourth album Automaton Assisted Annihilation. 

Though being inducted into the industrial world via DWA's vast roster of killer artists, it has been quite a difficult journey to get a lot of people to fully embrace Seraphim System's sound. Solo producer and mastermind of the project BL4KJ4K does not care for genre standards or tropes; he's a man who's as much a synth as his imagination takes him. With that mentality, he blends everything from industrial, hip-hop, and dubstep into his arsenal. 

The intro track is more cinematic than it is filled with big bass as a robotic voice along with the sounds of an all out sci-fi attack setting the mood for the rest of the album. Rightfully so, 'Come Up and Get Me' brings in everything I mentioned above. Big bass alongside smooth flowing, robotic vocals mesh together. It's shocking how well this clash of different ideas works, but somehow BL4KJ4K is able to work his magic. 

'Supreme Authority' takes it upon itself to be more dancefloor friendly with metallic clangs and a more electro flow to it. The same could be said about 'This Is Invasion', however it has a delightful, harder edge to it. What I enjoy about Seraphim System is that, although their are lyrics present with his songs, he mainly let's his experimental music procedures talk for himself. 

'Assault Protocol' has a beautiful break down section that begins around the two minute and ten second mark, which is brought back to life by faster spit lyrical content backed up by a rhythmic noise sounding segment. The two songs on the album that could blow your fucking ears right off would be 'Antihuman' and 'Descent'. Deadly bass drops and a lethal injection of darkly inspired synths will leave you wanting to both headbang and stomp your feet at the same time. 

'The Reaper' definitely has a nice industrial/experimental kick to it; this is a song that actually sounds as if it was recorded on a robotic battlefield. 'Cybermorphosis' is one of the more technically sound songs on the album as it isn't all about up and in-your face electronics. It has more meat to it. 'Firebomb' was a tad bit shocking as it is a really, slowed down dubstep, drum and bass sorta track. The final track 'Poetry in Extinction' utilized rhythmic big bass, more drum and bass, and as always the hip-hop influenced lyricism Seraphim System is known for. 

While others may have a hard time finding Seraphim System a blast to listen to, I am not. It's so easy to dive into his music and just completely enjoy yourself. Maybe that's because I'm not a judgmental bastard. But then again that's a lie considering I'm a critic. Nonetheless, this is a most impressive album where the bass is loud and the robots are angry. Get on it. 
4
Brutal Resonance

Seraphim System - Automaton Assisted Annihilation

8.0
"Great"
N/A
Electroracle
Released 2016 by DWA
What do you get when you have a gigantic hard-on for classic sci-fi films such as Terminator 2: Judgement Day, enjoy the wobbles of dubstep and the grit of industrial, yet all you want to be is a nihilistic sarcastic fuck while ironically enjoying life as much as you can? You get Seraphim System, the industrial project that recently played at Resistanz 2016 and was absolutely loved by the crowd. Handshakes, free beer, and signature requests all followed his set which included his remix of the T2 theme song. But before all that, there was November 2015, and in that normally thankful albeit cold month, Seraphim System's fourth album Automaton Assisted Annihilation. 

Though being inducted into the industrial world via DWA's vast roster of killer artists, it has been quite a difficult journey to get a lot of people to fully embrace Seraphim System's sound. Solo producer and mastermind of the project BL4KJ4K does not care for genre standards or tropes; he's a man who's as much a synth as his imagination takes him. With that mentality, he blends everything from industrial, hip-hop, and dubstep into his arsenal. 

The intro track is more cinematic than it is filled with big bass as a robotic voice along with the sounds of an all out sci-fi attack setting the mood for the rest of the album. Rightfully so, 'Come Up and Get Me' brings in everything I mentioned above. Big bass alongside smooth flowing, robotic vocals mesh together. It's shocking how well this clash of different ideas works, but somehow BL4KJ4K is able to work his magic. 

'Supreme Authority' takes it upon itself to be more dancefloor friendly with metallic clangs and a more electro flow to it. The same could be said about 'This Is Invasion', however it has a delightful, harder edge to it. What I enjoy about Seraphim System is that, although their are lyrics present with his songs, he mainly let's his experimental music procedures talk for himself. 

'Assault Protocol' has a beautiful break down section that begins around the two minute and ten second mark, which is brought back to life by faster spit lyrical content backed up by a rhythmic noise sounding segment. The two songs on the album that could blow your fucking ears right off would be 'Antihuman' and 'Descent'. Deadly bass drops and a lethal injection of darkly inspired synths will leave you wanting to both headbang and stomp your feet at the same time. 

'The Reaper' definitely has a nice industrial/experimental kick to it; this is a song that actually sounds as if it was recorded on a robotic battlefield. 'Cybermorphosis' is one of the more technically sound songs on the album as it isn't all about up and in-your face electronics. It has more meat to it. 'Firebomb' was a tad bit shocking as it is a really, slowed down dubstep, drum and bass sorta track. The final track 'Poetry in Extinction' utilized rhythmic big bass, more drum and bass, and as always the hip-hop influenced lyricism Seraphim System is known for. 

While others may have a hard time finding Seraphim System a blast to listen to, I am not. It's so easy to dive into his music and just completely enjoy yourself. Maybe that's because I'm not a judgmental bastard. But then again that's a lie considering I'm a critic. Nonetheless, this is a most impressive album where the bass is loud and the robots are angry. Get on it. 
May 08 2016

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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