Paul Robb - Nocturnes
Ambient, Experimental Best known for his role in the electro/freestyle/pop band Information Society, Paul Robb has recently diverted his attention to a subtle style. Robb has given birth to a new solo outing that has given birth to the beautifully put together "Nocturnes". This album is a moving, emotional piece that covers so many glorious pictures and images in the listeners minds. While Robb has purposefully left so many attractions in the album vague and without title, it is all up to our minds, as the listener, to determine what sounds are attributed to what paintings. 

Now, this album is underneath the ambient genre even though Robb says otherwise. However, this is not your strict, run of the mill offshoot ambient project that was created by some amateur producer in a basement. No, this is a well thought out production that spans more than fifty minutes. Robb has also been quick to point out that this is not just background music. He wants to engage the listener, making them want to pay attention to his music and not just use it as some useless background music as a chore is done. This is an art in itself. 

On "Nocturnes" there are eight pieces numbered in a scattered order. The numbers, presumably from low to high, showcase which songs were recorded first. However, the order they were put in is how Robb thought they would best be listened to. Continuing on aesthetics, the cover art is quite catching; a poor little baby bird is being struck by a brutal blizzard, or so it seems. It's almost a helpless situation, and it invoked pity within me. I can only hope that that poor little bird makes it out of its predicament alive. 

Now, onto the music. 'Nocturne #1' is a very cinematic piece, lasting around eleven minutes. Light enough in atmosphere, the song is able to break you down into a calm state with charming and gracious synth lines. 'Nocturne #2' plays off an experimental vibe. I'd say this track pertains more to minimal noise than anything. I will admit that it was hard to actually find myself attracted to this song. Minimalism is a bitch to tackle, and to make it want to be heard is even a tougher task. While the effects within it were certainly interesting, they could not make up for the barren wasteland I experienced. 

'Nocturne #7' picked up more on the pace of the first track, allocating more light synth work and strung out notes in its mainframe. Again, the song made me at peace and was blissful. 'Nocturne #3' played out like a soft lullaby, and would be perfect for relaxation and meditation. 

'Nocturne #5' came along and was more in the form of 'Nocturne #2'. Risky experimental noises came along, like the pulsating heartbeat of a slumbering robotic system. However, this time around the efforts paid off. The song did loop and did get repetitious, but for some reason I just didn't mind. I rather enjoyed my time spent with the track. 

With a slightly heavier atmosphere, 'Nocturne #8' came along next. Utilizing drone tactics, longer notes did play out. Other swiping effects kept the song in motion, but they weren't enough to really keep it a thrill ride. Perhaps the most well done track on the album thus far, 'Nocturne #4' combined both the experimental and ambient sides of Robb's talent in one wholesome song. Static-ish element blended with higher pitched ambiance. As the track moved on, digital altercations came by. It was like wandering through a factory that was hit by a nuclear bomb, with it's only remnants being machines continuing their quotas even after their operators had died. Lastly, the only song with a name on the album played out. 'Aubade' hit with similar notes to previous soothing ambient works found earlier in the album, but still managed to impress. 

Now, I won't sit here and say that Robb is a grandmaster in the experimental and ambient fields by any means. No, that would both be a lie and not benefit him nor I. What I will say is that this man has put together a very well done, very well produced ambient/experimental album that really is better off listened to on its own rather than just as background music. While he does have some leaps and bounds to make as his time goes on, he really is off to a good start. 

If you're looking for a way to just unwind from a stressful day, look no further than "Nocturnes". It's sure to be a healthy relieving agent while soothing your soul. 
4
Brutal Resonance

Paul Robb - Nocturnes

7.0
"Good"
N/A
Electroracle
Released off label 2015
Best known for his role in the electro/freestyle/pop band Information Society, Paul Robb has recently diverted his attention to a subtle style. Robb has given birth to a new solo outing that has given birth to the beautifully put together "Nocturnes". This album is a moving, emotional piece that covers so many glorious pictures and images in the listeners minds. While Robb has purposefully left so many attractions in the album vague and without title, it is all up to our minds, as the listener, to determine what sounds are attributed to what paintings. 

Now, this album is underneath the ambient genre even though Robb says otherwise. However, this is not your strict, run of the mill offshoot ambient project that was created by some amateur producer in a basement. No, this is a well thought out production that spans more than fifty minutes. Robb has also been quick to point out that this is not just background music. He wants to engage the listener, making them want to pay attention to his music and not just use it as some useless background music as a chore is done. This is an art in itself. 

On "Nocturnes" there are eight pieces numbered in a scattered order. The numbers, presumably from low to high, showcase which songs were recorded first. However, the order they were put in is how Robb thought they would best be listened to. Continuing on aesthetics, the cover art is quite catching; a poor little baby bird is being struck by a brutal blizzard, or so it seems. It's almost a helpless situation, and it invoked pity within me. I can only hope that that poor little bird makes it out of its predicament alive. 

Now, onto the music. 'Nocturne #1' is a very cinematic piece, lasting around eleven minutes. Light enough in atmosphere, the song is able to break you down into a calm state with charming and gracious synth lines. 'Nocturne #2' plays off an experimental vibe. I'd say this track pertains more to minimal noise than anything. I will admit that it was hard to actually find myself attracted to this song. Minimalism is a bitch to tackle, and to make it want to be heard is even a tougher task. While the effects within it were certainly interesting, they could not make up for the barren wasteland I experienced. 

'Nocturne #7' picked up more on the pace of the first track, allocating more light synth work and strung out notes in its mainframe. Again, the song made me at peace and was blissful. 'Nocturne #3' played out like a soft lullaby, and would be perfect for relaxation and meditation. 

'Nocturne #5' came along and was more in the form of 'Nocturne #2'. Risky experimental noises came along, like the pulsating heartbeat of a slumbering robotic system. However, this time around the efforts paid off. The song did loop and did get repetitious, but for some reason I just didn't mind. I rather enjoyed my time spent with the track. 

With a slightly heavier atmosphere, 'Nocturne #8' came along next. Utilizing drone tactics, longer notes did play out. Other swiping effects kept the song in motion, but they weren't enough to really keep it a thrill ride. Perhaps the most well done track on the album thus far, 'Nocturne #4' combined both the experimental and ambient sides of Robb's talent in one wholesome song. Static-ish element blended with higher pitched ambiance. As the track moved on, digital altercations came by. It was like wandering through a factory that was hit by a nuclear bomb, with it's only remnants being machines continuing their quotas even after their operators had died. Lastly, the only song with a name on the album played out. 'Aubade' hit with similar notes to previous soothing ambient works found earlier in the album, but still managed to impress. 

Now, I won't sit here and say that Robb is a grandmaster in the experimental and ambient fields by any means. No, that would both be a lie and not benefit him nor I. What I will say is that this man has put together a very well done, very well produced ambient/experimental album that really is better off listened to on its own rather than just as background music. While he does have some leaps and bounds to make as his time goes on, he really is off to a good start. 

If you're looking for a way to just unwind from a stressful day, look no further than "Nocturnes". It's sure to be a healthy relieving agent while soothing your soul. 
Aug 13 2015

Off label

Official release released by the artist themselves without the backing of a label.

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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