Marek X. Marchoff - Funeral Muzik fur Jenny Marchoff
Experimental This is a very odd composition, indeed. Fifteen years ago, the grandmother of this artist, Jenny Marchoff had passed away. And she was a very important, influential, and beloved figure in Marek Marchoff's life. This album was written as a way to cope, and every range of emotion that can be felt when a relative passes is found within this album; from nostalgia, to despair, to happiness, to even mourning. Hidden from time for quite a while, it has only been resurrected recently, not touched or remastered, to let the listener experience the exact same emotion that was conveyed oh-so many years ago.

Thorpa Lea Road started off the album with some pretty odd sounds and effects. It's hard to describe them exactly, but it's almost as if you're experiencing the sounds of a UFO above your head, but you're too tired to determine as to whether or not what you're seeing is real, or just part of a dream.

Egham starts off with an odd sample of what sounds like a baby either saying something in a foreign language, or just making noises. A sort of low quality bell effect is used with a light, but high pitched synth also leading the way. This sound continues for too long, as it lasts a good seven minutes before much decides to change. A few more sound effects decide to break the pace, and at around the eight minute mark, the bell goes away and we're met with a dark ambient sound. That lasts for four minutes before a light, creepy tone joins in adding a horror-like effect. THe final portion of the song which lasts from about the fourteen and a half minute mark and on is awesome. A few chimes, the same dark ambient sound well underneath the recording, and a resemblance of a rhythm all play along.

Orylska sort of works as an intermission, lasting only thirty five seconds, having a minimalist approach with a few sci-fi like effects and what sounds like a xylophone. It also serves as a pretty good precursor to Brixton. This song sort of takes on the same atmosphere that the previous did, with a minimal approach, and noises that make you feel as if you're on an alien planet. Though the life around you beckons to be explored, you can't help but be put down by the emotional tension that surrounds your body.

27th Street definitely has some wonderful throws to IDM, and plays with the electronics in the song extremely well. I absolutely adored this song. And, for something that was recorded fifteen years ago, this is one song that comes off clear.

Broadway goes back into the dark ambient, odd end of the book. Random sections placed throughout focusing on one main sound or another before switching to the next. And, again, I reminisce of songs that would be found in old-school horror movies.

Amityville continues the pace from where the last song left off, and can definitely creep someone out in one form or the next. The final song, Chrysler Benz - New Yorker 86, which title takes itself after a car, is too repetitive for me to enjoy.

Now, for as heartfelt this entire work was supposed to be, I felt as if it was a bit off. Certainly, this is the artist's way of outputting his emotions, but to others, this may seem a bit odd. Everyone experiences a form of grief differently, especially musically, and perhaps this is a work that was best left to himself. But, to share it to the world, when he created a piece that was more for himself at one of his most down times, well, that is remarkable. The act was certainly noble, and the music may be hard to understand, but there is something special here that I can't just quite throw away.
3
Brutal Resonance

Marek X. Marchoff - Funeral Muzik fur Jenny Marchoff

6.0
"Alright"
N/A
Electroracle
Released 2013 by Zoharum Records
This is a very odd composition, indeed. Fifteen years ago, the grandmother of this artist, Jenny Marchoff had passed away. And she was a very important, influential, and beloved figure in Marek Marchoff's life. This album was written as a way to cope, and every range of emotion that can be felt when a relative passes is found within this album; from nostalgia, to despair, to happiness, to even mourning. Hidden from time for quite a while, it has only been resurrected recently, not touched or remastered, to let the listener experience the exact same emotion that was conveyed oh-so many years ago.

Thorpa Lea Road started off the album with some pretty odd sounds and effects. It's hard to describe them exactly, but it's almost as if you're experiencing the sounds of a UFO above your head, but you're too tired to determine as to whether or not what you're seeing is real, or just part of a dream.

Egham starts off with an odd sample of what sounds like a baby either saying something in a foreign language, or just making noises. A sort of low quality bell effect is used with a light, but high pitched synth also leading the way. This sound continues for too long, as it lasts a good seven minutes before much decides to change. A few more sound effects decide to break the pace, and at around the eight minute mark, the bell goes away and we're met with a dark ambient sound. That lasts for four minutes before a light, creepy tone joins in adding a horror-like effect. THe final portion of the song which lasts from about the fourteen and a half minute mark and on is awesome. A few chimes, the same dark ambient sound well underneath the recording, and a resemblance of a rhythm all play along.

Orylska sort of works as an intermission, lasting only thirty five seconds, having a minimalist approach with a few sci-fi like effects and what sounds like a xylophone. It also serves as a pretty good precursor to Brixton. This song sort of takes on the same atmosphere that the previous did, with a minimal approach, and noises that make you feel as if you're on an alien planet. Though the life around you beckons to be explored, you can't help but be put down by the emotional tension that surrounds your body.

27th Street definitely has some wonderful throws to IDM, and plays with the electronics in the song extremely well. I absolutely adored this song. And, for something that was recorded fifteen years ago, this is one song that comes off clear.

Broadway goes back into the dark ambient, odd end of the book. Random sections placed throughout focusing on one main sound or another before switching to the next. And, again, I reminisce of songs that would be found in old-school horror movies.

Amityville continues the pace from where the last song left off, and can definitely creep someone out in one form or the next. The final song, Chrysler Benz - New Yorker 86, which title takes itself after a car, is too repetitive for me to enjoy.

Now, for as heartfelt this entire work was supposed to be, I felt as if it was a bit off. Certainly, this is the artist's way of outputting his emotions, but to others, this may seem a bit odd. Everyone experiences a form of grief differently, especially musically, and perhaps this is a work that was best left to himself. But, to share it to the world, when he created a piece that was more for himself at one of his most down times, well, that is remarkable. The act was certainly noble, and the music may be hard to understand, but there is something special here that I can't just quite throw away. Jun 29 2014

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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