Juz Nie Zyjesz - Nieswiat
Coldwave, Synthpop What I'm about to review is a completely Polish act through and through. While I normally like to give a bit of history here and there in reviews, I really wasn't able to find much on them that wasn't written in their native language. And, with translations from Google and other online internet sources being nearly unreadable, and with my complete lack of any knowledge on the Polish language, I'm going to be taking this review based on complete musical critique.

So, the first question that's usually asked is what are you actually getting yourself into. I was introduced to this band as a synthpop band with punk and electro influences. Whatever the case is, and however you wish to classify your music, this isn't half bad at all.

The vocals are clear as can be, and if I knew Polish, the songs would be pretty easy to follow through on. They aren't menacing in any sense, but are definitely meant to be felt passionately. And I sort of get that feeling when listening to such songs as Sciany. However, in other songs, I felt as if the voice didn't go along so well with the music surrounding it. Such as in Nikt. It wasn't the worst thing I've ever heard, but if both the vocals and the music were to just cooperate with another more than not, I think some songs would have made out better.

When it comes to the musical end of the deal, you're getting a fairly light album. Nothing screams out too much, and all the instruments being used go well with one another. Not one demands more attention than the next. While synths are used, it's mainly the guitars and drums that shall stand out in this album. Widok shows that off for us positively.

However, one complaint that I have when it comes to this album is that, as well as everything works, there's not much about it that stands out to me. I mean, I've been through it a few times already, and I can't really point out one song that I would want to keep on repeat, or one that I would really want to hear again later on. There is something here, however, in order to catch audiences onto this release, or future releases, there needs to be some sort of musical rendition that will capture their attention and make them want to stick around for more.
3
Brutal Resonance

Juz Nie Zyjesz - Nieswiat

6.0
"Alright"
Released 2014 by Machineries
What I'm about to review is a completely Polish act through and through. While I normally like to give a bit of history here and there in reviews, I really wasn't able to find much on them that wasn't written in their native language. And, with translations from Google and other online internet sources being nearly unreadable, and with my complete lack of any knowledge on the Polish language, I'm going to be taking this review based on complete musical critique.

So, the first question that's usually asked is what are you actually getting yourself into. I was introduced to this band as a synthpop band with punk and electro influences. Whatever the case is, and however you wish to classify your music, this isn't half bad at all.

The vocals are clear as can be, and if I knew Polish, the songs would be pretty easy to follow through on. They aren't menacing in any sense, but are definitely meant to be felt passionately. And I sort of get that feeling when listening to such songs as Sciany. However, in other songs, I felt as if the voice didn't go along so well with the music surrounding it. Such as in Nikt. It wasn't the worst thing I've ever heard, but if both the vocals and the music were to just cooperate with another more than not, I think some songs would have made out better.

When it comes to the musical end of the deal, you're getting a fairly light album. Nothing screams out too much, and all the instruments being used go well with one another. Not one demands more attention than the next. While synths are used, it's mainly the guitars and drums that shall stand out in this album. Widok shows that off for us positively.

However, one complaint that I have when it comes to this album is that, as well as everything works, there's not much about it that stands out to me. I mean, I've been through it a few times already, and I can't really point out one song that I would want to keep on repeat, or one that I would really want to hear again later on. There is something here, however, in order to catch audiences onto this release, or future releases, there needs to be some sort of musical rendition that will capture their attention and make them want to stick around for more. Mar 25 2014

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

Share this review

Facebook
Twitter
Google+
8
Shares

Buy this release

BandCamp

Shortly about us

Started in spring 2009, Brutal Resonance quickly grew from a Swedish based netzine into an established International zine of the highest standard.

We cover genres like Synthpop, EBM, Industrial, Dark Ambient, Neofolk, Darkwave, Noise and all their sub- and similar genres.

© Brutal Resonance 2009-2016
Designed by and developed by Head of Mímir 2016