Genus Inkasso - Odd Little Gestures
Experimental I can't really write an introduction in a formal manner as every ounce of information that is normally found online about an artist just is not there for Germany's Genus Inkasso. You will be able to find a few releases here and there for this experimental producer with minor information, but other than that this person is a blank slate. While on one hand I respect that, as Genus Inkasso allows his music to do the talking rather than his person becoming a figurehead, I also find it a little bit annoying that I cannot really learn about the person behind the music. Alas, here I am reviewing Genus Inkasso's one second short of twenty-six minutes single Odd Little Gestures.

Yes, it is a single, but as I said it is nearly a half hour long. What it is is an extremely experimental track that is rather down in mood. I suppose a horror film with focus on minimalism and suspense would do well with this type of material. Even the cover art has a weird vibe about it. A lone, small airplane sits in the middle of a field of grass, Though dark on the inside, I can almost make out the pilot sitting in his plane. Standing before this plane is a darkened figure in a giant, trench coat. As you look at the cover as you listen to the song, you can't help but feel a bit of fear for the man inside the airplane. 

Now, as for the song itself, I was quite surprised by the depth of it all. Most songs like this that go on for an above average extent usually tend to loop and dry out with constant drones. Genus Inkasso avoids that at all costs. At first, what sounds like Morse code is transmitted out from the song with an ever slight bit of static behind it. Rewound tape loops come forth, and it is eerily beautiful. Slowly and steady, the rhythm builds with the sounds of war and drums, but cuts right back into simplicity. Again, backward sounds come out, like subliminal cries for help. For a couple of minutes, there is just ambiance played out with random effects out before what sounds like someone tapping on glass with nails is brought forth. Around the twelve minute mark, ritualistic drums come forth. It's at this time that I feel as if I'm part of some sort of masochistic's twisted plan. Classical music plays out behind the drums, adding to the mood of the song, but that sound soon goes away for a more rushed, panicked beat. A down-tempo like sound crawls out for a short while, before just deep atmosphere rushes in around the twenty minute mark. All that cuts out not a minute later, and the song is thrust into a static, aural assault. 

So, even though I hardly know anything about this artist, it is rather nice to hear from them. Odd Little Gestures is exactly that; a combination of weird sounds and noises put together for our listening pleasure. Its strange, sometimes spooky, but Odd Little Gestures is altogether a wonderful sound to listen to. I'll be waiting to hear more from this artist in the future. 
4
Brutal Resonance

Genus Inkasso - Odd Little Gestures

7.5
"Good"
N/A
Electroracle
Released 2016 by Tonestrukt
I can't really write an introduction in a formal manner as every ounce of information that is normally found online about an artist just is not there for Germany's Genus Inkasso. You will be able to find a few releases here and there for this experimental producer with minor information, but other than that this person is a blank slate. While on one hand I respect that, as Genus Inkasso allows his music to do the talking rather than his person becoming a figurehead, I also find it a little bit annoying that I cannot really learn about the person behind the music. Alas, here I am reviewing Genus Inkasso's one second short of twenty-six minutes single Odd Little Gestures.

Yes, it is a single, but as I said it is nearly a half hour long. What it is is an extremely experimental track that is rather down in mood. I suppose a horror film with focus on minimalism and suspense would do well with this type of material. Even the cover art has a weird vibe about it. A lone, small airplane sits in the middle of a field of grass, Though dark on the inside, I can almost make out the pilot sitting in his plane. Standing before this plane is a darkened figure in a giant, trench coat. As you look at the cover as you listen to the song, you can't help but feel a bit of fear for the man inside the airplane. 

Now, as for the song itself, I was quite surprised by the depth of it all. Most songs like this that go on for an above average extent usually tend to loop and dry out with constant drones. Genus Inkasso avoids that at all costs. At first, what sounds like Morse code is transmitted out from the song with an ever slight bit of static behind it. Rewound tape loops come forth, and it is eerily beautiful. Slowly and steady, the rhythm builds with the sounds of war and drums, but cuts right back into simplicity. Again, backward sounds come out, like subliminal cries for help. For a couple of minutes, there is just ambiance played out with random effects out before what sounds like someone tapping on glass with nails is brought forth. Around the twelve minute mark, ritualistic drums come forth. It's at this time that I feel as if I'm part of some sort of masochistic's twisted plan. Classical music plays out behind the drums, adding to the mood of the song, but that sound soon goes away for a more rushed, panicked beat. A down-tempo like sound crawls out for a short while, before just deep atmosphere rushes in around the twenty minute mark. All that cuts out not a minute later, and the song is thrust into a static, aural assault. 

So, even though I hardly know anything about this artist, it is rather nice to hear from them. Odd Little Gestures is exactly that; a combination of weird sounds and noises put together for our listening pleasure. Its strange, sometimes spooky, but Odd Little Gestures is altogether a wonderful sound to listen to. I'll be waiting to hear more from this artist in the future. 
Feb 25 2016

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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