E.S.A. - Themes of Carnal Empowerment Pt. 2: Deceit
Rhythmic Noise, Death Industrial I love waking up in the morning only to find that what I sat down to review is simply fantastic. It just gives my day a whole new meaning and gives me the motivation I need to carry out brutal and harsh tasks (such as taking out the trash). Jokes aside, E.S.A. has followed up their previous album, Themes Of Carnal Empowerment Pt. I : Lust with this one, same title, however this is part 2, aptly using the feeling of deceit to push forward the rhythmic noise that pervades our ears and hits us in the gut with passion.

This is an eleven track wonder, and at first, it sounds very, very soothing to the ears. Let the Sinful Sparrow Sing begins off the whole show, It breaks the ice with a very, very slow ambient work that builds up with darkened piano keys, and. before you know it, you're delving into a blissful harmony with gorgeous female vocals. This was a remarkable way to start off an album.

And, the first song just continues to build into this marching tune before fully slamming you into the rhythmic noise power that E.S.A. is so good at delivering. If the first song is meant to showcase beauty, I Know Your Wounds is meant to showcase rigorous filth; the song is fast and unforgiving, slamming you left and right with it's powerful bass. But, then again, this song rolled right into the third one.

The Heart is Marked continues the trend of savvy rhythmic noise; I would say it makes it a little more dance worthy. Some very distorted and angry vocals play in the song. There's a bit of a break halfway in the song, but slowly continues back up into more noise, before quieting down again into the next song, Breathing Through You,

This track is interesting because it hits you with noise in the beginning for a second or two, and then breaks, and then continues, and repeats the pattern until all you're getting is more solid noise. Tribal like drums come into effect and make the song more interesting, along with a little more electronics. Towards the end, it breaks down straight into an electronic nightmare, paving the way for the next song, The Shape of Hate to Come.

It follows through with those electronics, the prophecy being fulfilled, and everything comes together nicely. It's a bit slower than the rest of the album, but the samples that are thrusted into the song are a lot more creepy than any of the others on the album. However, that's just a little break before being slammed back into power mode with the title track, Deceit (The Sharpening of Shears). Humming comes crossing into the boundaries with a wonderful synth line. When the noise, the synths, and the humming all comes in together, it's amazing.

Then we get into the most danceable song so far on the album with No One Will Ever Touch You. More creepy whispering flows in with this track, with a far off, tortured like voice hitting us, as well. The next track takes on a very warming title, called, If I Could Hurt You All Over Again, I Would. It felt a bit standard for the most part, up until I hit a part with piano work and more female vocals. It was a pretty contrast to what I was just listening and served very, very well. The noise paired with the singing and the piano work towards the end of the song has become the highlight of the album for myself.

As sad as I was when that song ended, I was glad to hear While You Sleep I Converse With The Dark Birds. This was a very tribal like song. It was different from the rest of the album, so it was able to keep my attention fairly well. The chanting that went along with the song kept up with the tribal aesthetics, and was glorious.

And, as the final track on the album, Confudere, was fairly low-fi, and slow. However, the final minute of the album gave us a shocking goodbye in the form of more rhythmic noise. It was pretty harsh, had a good beat going to it, and was a pretty surprise considering the last few minutes of the song descended into an ambient soundscape.

And, here, I come to an end of the review. If you've any respect for noise in any shape, you will take a listen to this album. It's absolutely fantastic, and was a treat to discover around the holidays. This is like an early Christmas present for myself, even though it released back in June. I am flattered that I am even able to listen to this; it has been an honor, and I can't wait until I'm able to sit down again and experience this joy ride all over again.
5
Brutal Resonance

E.S.A. - Themes of Carnal Empowerment Pt. 2: Deceit

I love waking up in the morning only to find that what I sat down to review is simply fantastic. It just gives my day a whole new meaning and gives me the motivation I need to carry out brutal and harsh tasks (such as taking out the trash). Jokes aside, E.S.A. has followed up their previous album, Themes Of Carnal Empowerment Pt. I : Lust with this one, same title, however this is part 2, aptly using the feeling of deceit to push forward the rhythmic noise that pervades our ears and hits us in the gut with passion.

This is an eleven track wonder, and at first, it sounds very, very soothing to the ears. Let the Sinful Sparrow Sing begins off the whole show, It breaks the ice with a very, very slow ambient work that builds up with darkened piano keys, and. before you know it, you're delving into a blissful harmony with gorgeous female vocals. This was a remarkable way to start off an album.

And, the first song just continues to build into this marching tune before fully slamming you into the rhythmic noise power that E.S.A. is so good at delivering. If the first song is meant to showcase beauty, I Know Your Wounds is meant to showcase rigorous filth; the song is fast and unforgiving, slamming you left and right with it's powerful bass. But, then again, this song rolled right into the third one.

The Heart is Marked continues the trend of savvy rhythmic noise; I would say it makes it a little more dance worthy. Some very distorted and angry vocals play in the song. There's a bit of a break halfway in the song, but slowly continues back up into more noise, before quieting down again into the next song, Breathing Through You,

This track is interesting because it hits you with noise in the beginning for a second or two, and then breaks, and then continues, and repeats the pattern until all you're getting is more solid noise. Tribal like drums come into effect and make the song more interesting, along with a little more electronics. Towards the end, it breaks down straight into an electronic nightmare, paving the way for the next song, The Shape of Hate to Come.

It follows through with those electronics, the prophecy being fulfilled, and everything comes together nicely. It's a bit slower than the rest of the album, but the samples that are thrusted into the song are a lot more creepy than any of the others on the album. However, that's just a little break before being slammed back into power mode with the title track, Deceit (The Sharpening of Shears). Humming comes crossing into the boundaries with a wonderful synth line. When the noise, the synths, and the humming all comes in together, it's amazing.

Then we get into the most danceable song so far on the album with No One Will Ever Touch You. More creepy whispering flows in with this track, with a far off, tortured like voice hitting us, as well. The next track takes on a very warming title, called, If I Could Hurt You All Over Again, I Would. It felt a bit standard for the most part, up until I hit a part with piano work and more female vocals. It was a pretty contrast to what I was just listening and served very, very well. The noise paired with the singing and the piano work towards the end of the song has become the highlight of the album for myself.

As sad as I was when that song ended, I was glad to hear While You Sleep I Converse With The Dark Birds. This was a very tribal like song. It was different from the rest of the album, so it was able to keep my attention fairly well. The chanting that went along with the song kept up with the tribal aesthetics, and was glorious.

And, as the final track on the album, Confudere, was fairly low-fi, and slow. However, the final minute of the album gave us a shocking goodbye in the form of more rhythmic noise. It was pretty harsh, had a good beat going to it, and was a pretty surprise considering the last few minutes of the song descended into an ambient soundscape.

And, here, I come to an end of the review. If you've any respect for noise in any shape, you will take a listen to this album. It's absolutely fantastic, and was a treat to discover around the holidays. This is like an early Christmas present for myself, even though it released back in June. I am flattered that I am even able to listen to this; it has been an honor, and I can't wait until I'm able to sit down again and experience this joy ride all over again. Dec 13 2013

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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