Ecstasphere & Aphexia - Klangportrats I+II
Rhythmic Noise, Experimental I won't be light at all when I say I haven't really found the urge to write reviews as much as I have in the past lately; perhaps it's a musical depression that I find myself in where the tunes that hit my ears are just so blank and empty that I have no joy in typing out the most feeble words about them. To simply spend my time with those sounds for more than five minutes, I think, would be an atrocity on my own behalf, and would not be healthy for my body or soul. And this all boils down to my next point that I'm going to make over the next few paragraphs or so.

Within this journey that I've had of passing by album after album, release after release and single after single, I emerged from the quicksand pit I so found myself caught within victoriously and with room to breathe. That would be all thanks to Ophelia The Suffering, a German based composer mixed well within the world of rhythmic noise, ambient, IDM, and just general experimental anthems that kick the shit out of nearly everything that crosses its path.

Now, before I continue on and jump into this album, you must understand that The Suffering goes by two different names when writing and creating music: Ecstasphere and Aphexia. Ecstasphere is listed as putting out rhythmic noise, industrial, electronica, and experimental music, but there is more to the name than just mere genres.

This project molds the inner mechanics of her mind in spiritual, intellectual, and emotional currents of life that trickle straight down into fragments of unreal music. The result, more often than not, is breathtaking pieces that showcase just how whole music makes her heart. Aside from pouring out her own thoughts and ideologies into the experience, Ophelia is also attempting to bring out thought, creativity, and a desire to become something more within you, the listener. Once more, for myself, at least, she has succeeded in inspiring creativity and a sense of awareness through this meditative album. For her other project, Aphexia (Electronica, IDM, Industrial influenced ambient sounds), there isn't as much detail to be found about it as Ecstasphere, but a simple quote listed on the Facebook page for this project speaks enough, "aphexia seeks liberation in expression".

Either way, under both projects names, Ophelia has released a double EP entitled Klangportrats I+II. As such, both sections of the EP are simply separated as I and II, which is good enough to be able to tell the difference in styles. I'd say that section I is the craftwork of Ecstasphere as section II belongs to the creative name of Aphexia, although you can see some similarities between the two as they both stem from the same mind. That's not a complaint, however, as each song brings forth a unique culmination of sounds that puts together collages from Ophelia's psyche.

Now, section I is completely instrumental aside from a few whispers that may happen every now and then here and there. But, as it goes, they are so subliminal that they just sound like another electronic line or instrument being tapped into. Through each song, pulses of rhythmic noise deepened with bass are often set out with ambient structures moving right behind them, which easily makes for magical authority not to be toyed with. Without further ado, though, let me quote something the artist said about section I:

" It is centered around spherical soundscapes and penetrating subbasses and generally has a very abstract quality to it that illustrates a hypnotized, floating feeling of timeless submersion."

There is no better way to learn what this part of Klangportrats attracted then to simply listen to the mouth Ophelia herself. But, arguably, what's more important would be the vocally decorated section II.

While there may have been some nervous tension in how this section would be received from the artist, as it is a new avenue into her music composition, there is naught to fear. Every sound comes off wonderfully, even if it does beckon a little to the first half, but the structure appears tighter, and there is an evolution in a sense of progression within the works. Any single person who even attempts to doubt the chords of this siren need only listen to Marie, as around the six minute mark Ophelia puts out a beautiful solo with nothing but a string instrument backing her voice and it comes off as one of the most loving sounds I have ever come across in my life.

Going into aesthetics, the simple brilliance of the artwork on the album was enough to entice me to move straight toward it. Just as the music goes, the beautiful drawing so perfectly laid out on the cover is just as abstract as the album can be, and its meaning can be numerous from varying person to varying person. If I could get a poster of this to put on my wall, I would, because it's simply lovely and would make for excellent home decor. You can thank Lisa Schwabe for this awesome craft.

If my long digested thoughts and considerations that have so carefully been put across throughout this entire review have not been enough to deliver the message I've been trying to convey for the last few paragraphs, then let me be blunt: This EP is one of the best I've had the pleasure of listening to in 2015 thus far. Give Klangportrats a thorough listen, immerse yourself in the experience, live and let die. This has hit the top of my 2015 list, and it will take a real rocker to get it anywhere near off.
5
Brutal Resonance

Ecstasphere & Aphexia - Klangportrats I+II

I won't be light at all when I say I haven't really found the urge to write reviews as much as I have in the past lately; perhaps it's a musical depression that I find myself in where the tunes that hit my ears are just so blank and empty that I have no joy in typing out the most feeble words about them. To simply spend my time with those sounds for more than five minutes, I think, would be an atrocity on my own behalf, and would not be healthy for my body or soul. And this all boils down to my next point that I'm going to make over the next few paragraphs or so.

Within this journey that I've had of passing by album after album, release after release and single after single, I emerged from the quicksand pit I so found myself caught within victoriously and with room to breathe. That would be all thanks to Ophelia The Suffering, a German based composer mixed well within the world of rhythmic noise, ambient, IDM, and just general experimental anthems that kick the shit out of nearly everything that crosses its path.

Now, before I continue on and jump into this album, you must understand that The Suffering goes by two different names when writing and creating music: Ecstasphere and Aphexia. Ecstasphere is listed as putting out rhythmic noise, industrial, electronica, and experimental music, but there is more to the name than just mere genres.

This project molds the inner mechanics of her mind in spiritual, intellectual, and emotional currents of life that trickle straight down into fragments of unreal music. The result, more often than not, is breathtaking pieces that showcase just how whole music makes her heart. Aside from pouring out her own thoughts and ideologies into the experience, Ophelia is also attempting to bring out thought, creativity, and a desire to become something more within you, the listener. Once more, for myself, at least, she has succeeded in inspiring creativity and a sense of awareness through this meditative album. For her other project, Aphexia (Electronica, IDM, Industrial influenced ambient sounds), there isn't as much detail to be found about it as Ecstasphere, but a simple quote listed on the Facebook page for this project speaks enough, "aphexia seeks liberation in expression".

Either way, under both projects names, Ophelia has released a double EP entitled Klangportrats I+II. As such, both sections of the EP are simply separated as I and II, which is good enough to be able to tell the difference in styles. I'd say that section I is the craftwork of Ecstasphere as section II belongs to the creative name of Aphexia, although you can see some similarities between the two as they both stem from the same mind. That's not a complaint, however, as each song brings forth a unique culmination of sounds that puts together collages from Ophelia's psyche.

Now, section I is completely instrumental aside from a few whispers that may happen every now and then here and there. But, as it goes, they are so subliminal that they just sound like another electronic line or instrument being tapped into. Through each song, pulses of rhythmic noise deepened with bass are often set out with ambient structures moving right behind them, which easily makes for magical authority not to be toyed with. Without further ado, though, let me quote something the artist said about section I:

" It is centered around spherical soundscapes and penetrating subbasses and generally has a very abstract quality to it that illustrates a hypnotized, floating feeling of timeless submersion."

There is no better way to learn what this part of Klangportrats attracted then to simply listen to the mouth Ophelia herself. But, arguably, what's more important would be the vocally decorated section II.

While there may have been some nervous tension in how this section would be received from the artist, as it is a new avenue into her music composition, there is naught to fear. Every sound comes off wonderfully, even if it does beckon a little to the first half, but the structure appears tighter, and there is an evolution in a sense of progression within the works. Any single person who even attempts to doubt the chords of this siren need only listen to Marie, as around the six minute mark Ophelia puts out a beautiful solo with nothing but a string instrument backing her voice and it comes off as one of the most loving sounds I have ever come across in my life.

Going into aesthetics, the simple brilliance of the artwork on the album was enough to entice me to move straight toward it. Just as the music goes, the beautiful drawing so perfectly laid out on the cover is just as abstract as the album can be, and its meaning can be numerous from varying person to varying person. If I could get a poster of this to put on my wall, I would, because it's simply lovely and would make for excellent home decor. You can thank Lisa Schwabe for this awesome craft.

If my long digested thoughts and considerations that have so carefully been put across throughout this entire review have not been enough to deliver the message I've been trying to convey for the last few paragraphs, then let me be blunt: This EP is one of the best I've had the pleasure of listening to in 2015 thus far. Give Klangportrats a thorough listen, immerse yourself in the experience, live and let die. This has hit the top of my 2015 list, and it will take a real rocker to get it anywhere near off. Feb 22 2015

Off label

Official release released by the artist themselves without the backing of a label.

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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