Dogfight Sox - Flux
Experimental, Industrial Rock Well, the story of Dogfight Sox is rather a funny one; two artists (Indigo and Crimson) came together through Facebook from two different genres of music, and decided to create an album together in 2010. After a long time spent in home recording, the duo finally released their debut album titled Lunatic Fairytales. It came to good reception on the site, and now here I am reviewing their latest EP, Flux. And I can say that this is another well piece that manages to make me laugh.

The first song, Konichiwa Bitches! introduces to us what I am pretty sure is the sound you here in the original Pokemon games when you're about to fight a wild Pokemon. We are then introduced straight into almost hip-hop inspired vocals, filled with a lot of pop culture (they mention the Hattori Hanzo swords from Kill Bill). Along with that comes a lot of guitar work, and a lot of other work that really makes this stand out. During the chorus, the guitar fades away, and we are treated to an Eastern culture inspired synth work.

Templum definitely takes a step with a lot of drum work, the guitar still in the background. And, this time, the vocals are definitely rap inspired. And the thing is, I am okay with this. A lot of times, I can't really stand rap fused with industrial at all. But, these guys pull it off somehow that appeals to my ears. Fuse in the dub step influences, and you have a pretty kick ass song.

Sunfall was rather slow and very ambient like for the first thirty seconds or so, but then we're given into more growling like vocals. They are angry, you can hear that just by the voice, and then at the minute and seventeen second mark, all the rage comes to open up with screaming and heavy guitars. The song then ebbs in and out of calming, sort of tribal-like beats and then back to the rough screaming and guitars. Again, I found myself liking this song.

Songs Of Distant Earth begins off with some rainfall, and then goes into a very light song compared to the rest. This is one that I really didn't enjoy too much, as I found it a bit too light for the fast paced vocals that shoot through the song. The contrast is just too great to enjoy. And, twice in the song the guitars come back with a robotic voice, and that really just didn't do me in too well, either.

And, finally, we come to my favorite song on the album, which would be The Intergalactic Chimpanzee Frenzee. There's a conversation going on between two apes, one growling, and one sounding like an overly concerned...Monkey. The song is funny in general, mixing in what I assume to be a space battle, along with drill mishaps, and also the two arguing over a pack of cigarettes. To me, this was hilarious.

However, in all hilarity, that is also where I see a bit of a downfall with this album. There's a shit ton of talent here, and a lot of variety, and a lot of it sounds awesome, but, sometimes, I find it to be a bit too immature for it's own good. Yes, the whole monkey thing at the end of the album made me chuckle, but after I was done listening to it, I also told myself, "This was a waste of time." It's a guilty pleasure of sorts. I will come back to listen to it again, but I can't say I'll do so feeling proud. But, nonetheless, I cannot deny good music when it is indeed pleasurable, and this was, in fact, a pleasurable album.
4
Brutal Resonance

Dogfight Sox - Flux

7.5
"Good"
Released 2012 by Dungeon Recordings
Well, the story of Dogfight Sox is rather a funny one; two artists (Indigo and Crimson) came together through Facebook from two different genres of music, and decided to create an album together in 2010. After a long time spent in home recording, the duo finally released their debut album titled Lunatic Fairytales. It came to good reception on the site, and now here I am reviewing their latest EP, Flux. And I can say that this is another well piece that manages to make me laugh.

The first song, Konichiwa Bitches! introduces to us what I am pretty sure is the sound you here in the original Pokemon games when you're about to fight a wild Pokemon. We are then introduced straight into almost hip-hop inspired vocals, filled with a lot of pop culture (they mention the Hattori Hanzo swords from Kill Bill). Along with that comes a lot of guitar work, and a lot of other work that really makes this stand out. During the chorus, the guitar fades away, and we are treated to an Eastern culture inspired synth work.

Templum definitely takes a step with a lot of drum work, the guitar still in the background. And, this time, the vocals are definitely rap inspired. And the thing is, I am okay with this. A lot of times, I can't really stand rap fused with industrial at all. But, these guys pull it off somehow that appeals to my ears. Fuse in the dub step influences, and you have a pretty kick ass song.

Sunfall was rather slow and very ambient like for the first thirty seconds or so, but then we're given into more growling like vocals. They are angry, you can hear that just by the voice, and then at the minute and seventeen second mark, all the rage comes to open up with screaming and heavy guitars. The song then ebbs in and out of calming, sort of tribal-like beats and then back to the rough screaming and guitars. Again, I found myself liking this song.

Songs Of Distant Earth begins off with some rainfall, and then goes into a very light song compared to the rest. This is one that I really didn't enjoy too much, as I found it a bit too light for the fast paced vocals that shoot through the song. The contrast is just too great to enjoy. And, twice in the song the guitars come back with a robotic voice, and that really just didn't do me in too well, either.

And, finally, we come to my favorite song on the album, which would be The Intergalactic Chimpanzee Frenzee. There's a conversation going on between two apes, one growling, and one sounding like an overly concerned...Monkey. The song is funny in general, mixing in what I assume to be a space battle, along with drill mishaps, and also the two arguing over a pack of cigarettes. To me, this was hilarious.

However, in all hilarity, that is also where I see a bit of a downfall with this album. There's a shit ton of talent here, and a lot of variety, and a lot of it sounds awesome, but, sometimes, I find it to be a bit too immature for it's own good. Yes, the whole monkey thing at the end of the album made me chuckle, but after I was done listening to it, I also told myself, "This was a waste of time." It's a guilty pleasure of sorts. I will come back to listen to it again, but I can't say I'll do so feeling proud. But, nonetheless, I cannot deny good music when it is indeed pleasurable, and this was, in fact, a pleasurable album. Aug 20 2013

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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