Death Made - Darkpop Redux
Synthpop Death Made is a two man synthpop act founded in 2007 by Oleg Gomer (Vocalist) from Israel, and Jonathan Rousso (synths) from Sweden. The same year the two joined forces, they released their first ten song demo including tracks such as Enslaved, Digital Rain, and Bad Girls Go To Hell. However, after this and another demo in 2008 called Planet Death, the act sort of fell off the face off the Earth. It wasn't until 2012 that they made a comeback of sorts with live performances and touched on tracks. Not only that, but this album was born from it, and was finally mastered.

And, Darkpop Redux definitely has the synthpop melodies going for it; upbeat hits left and right from track to track. The slow moving Enslaved definitely shows off that side of things, while Planet Death gets a bit more aggressive in both vocals and beat. The more electronic vocals in the song were neat, however.

The New World felt unbalanced between beat and vocals. The instrumentation sounded nice and clean, same with the vocals, but the spoken out like lyrics kind of dominated the song for the most part, which was a bit of a displeasure as the music surrounding them was great.

Digital Rain had some nice synth work going for it, the balance fixed. Nice and dancey, catchy, trance in a sense, the song was pretty good. I don't think the vocals went along too well with the song, though. Something needed to be fixed there; however, what exactly that was, I don't know.

Bad Girls Go To Hell began off with an organ like sound, the chords of the singer slowly coming in like a ghoul sneaking up on you in bed. I appreciated this song a lot, both for it's somewhat humorous lyrical content and its creepy tone.

Play With Me had another nice set of beats, but the vocals just knocked the song off. I guess my thoughts were pretty much summed up in the same manner with Our Revolution and onwards. Great music, but the vocals just couldn't match it.

And, I suppose that remains the main problem for this duo. When all is set in a more macabre and dark mood, the chords can match the overall nasty tone. However, when the synths get more set for a club atmosphere, more trance-like, the chords take a fall and that's not all too fun.

A merging of the two needs to happen so the songs can actually fit well together. Because, as of right now, like this, half the songs are enjoyable, but another half aren't. I think that if they were instrumentals, I'd be able to enjoy them a lot more by now.
3
Brutal Resonance

Death Made - Darkpop Redux

5.5
"Mediocre"
N/A
Electroracle
Released off label 2014
Death Made is a two man synthpop act founded in 2007 by Oleg Gomer (Vocalist) from Israel, and Jonathan Rousso (synths) from Sweden. The same year the two joined forces, they released their first ten song demo including tracks such as Enslaved, Digital Rain, and Bad Girls Go To Hell. However, after this and another demo in 2008 called Planet Death, the act sort of fell off the face off the Earth. It wasn't until 2012 that they made a comeback of sorts with live performances and touched on tracks. Not only that, but this album was born from it, and was finally mastered.

And, Darkpop Redux definitely has the synthpop melodies going for it; upbeat hits left and right from track to track. The slow moving Enslaved definitely shows off that side of things, while Planet Death gets a bit more aggressive in both vocals and beat. The more electronic vocals in the song were neat, however.

The New World felt unbalanced between beat and vocals. The instrumentation sounded nice and clean, same with the vocals, but the spoken out like lyrics kind of dominated the song for the most part, which was a bit of a displeasure as the music surrounding them was great.

Digital Rain had some nice synth work going for it, the balance fixed. Nice and dancey, catchy, trance in a sense, the song was pretty good. I don't think the vocals went along too well with the song, though. Something needed to be fixed there; however, what exactly that was, I don't know.

Bad Girls Go To Hell began off with an organ like sound, the chords of the singer slowly coming in like a ghoul sneaking up on you in bed. I appreciated this song a lot, both for it's somewhat humorous lyrical content and its creepy tone.

Play With Me had another nice set of beats, but the vocals just knocked the song off. I guess my thoughts were pretty much summed up in the same manner with Our Revolution and onwards. Great music, but the vocals just couldn't match it.

And, I suppose that remains the main problem for this duo. When all is set in a more macabre and dark mood, the chords can match the overall nasty tone. However, when the synths get more set for a club atmosphere, more trance-like, the chords take a fall and that's not all too fun.

A merging of the two needs to happen so the songs can actually fit well together. Because, as of right now, like this, half the songs are enjoyable, but another half aren't. I think that if they were instrumentals, I'd be able to enjoy them a lot more by now. Jul 20 2014

Off label

Official relesae released by the artist themselves without the backing of a label.

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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