Day Twelve - The Hours EP
EBM, Electronics Okay, as a short introduction, this is Day Twelve's first release coming out just two days ago. I discovered them on Bandcamp like so many others, and, as usual, I am damn proud that I found them. Hailing from Providence, Rhode Island, Day Twelve combines some very nice melodic beats with a powerful lead female voice that works well aside all the sounds.

Their first song, "Blu Print", really sets in well, with a slow beat to start off with, with a synth line and light piano work, as well as, well, more synths. The vocals kick in about thirty seconds in, and you are hit with beauty. They are deep vocals, but extremely nice at the same time. Sometimes, I find myself feeling as if the vocals go off a bit on the low end at the start of the singing, and as if the breath that they let off at the end of each line is annoying. But, that apart, the singing is still great. And the echoing beats along with the chorus effect that accompanies the voice is relatively adequate.

The next song in the line up is "Move", and is yet another good track. It combines a light drum line every couple of seconds, along with more synths and piano work. Again, the beats are nice, and the vocals come back. This time, there is a bit of screaming within the song, as little as it is, it's still there. And the lead singer also manages to hold a few notes, which isn't anything notable, but with a voice that nice it's lovely to hear.

Now, the basement starts off very slow, nothing but pure ambient work at first, which is then accompanied by more piano work and an extremely light synth, bordering on the line of, again, ambient work. The vocals go back to being deep, but quiet to accompany the tune of the track. And the song really remains light throughout, and is perhaps my favorite track on the album. It keeps its slow pace throughout, and hardly kicks up around the three minute mark.

And then comes along "Monster", which really is the Monster of the album. It's more dance floor like, and proves that Day Twelve is very well adapted to both making electronic pieces and also EBM tracks as they state they can. The vocals completely switch over to a more spoken style that goes along with the tune, and has a very light distortion to it. There is some screeching in the album, which can kick up to a higher pitch and be a nuiance in the ear, but is nothing to really whine about.

Now, as far as I can tell, this is a pretty good EP. It has a few flaws, and may not be the greatest thing that I have ever listened to, but it's still a damn good start for Day Twelve. Their lyrics are very nice, usually having some sort of meaning within them, and as a man who is usually listening to a shit ton of aggrotech with lyrics that usually either involve just pure hatred or mindless bullshit, it's nice to take a break and find something that I can enjoy out of that scene. And I have found that something in the form of Day Twelve. I tip my hat to them.
4
Brutal Resonance

Day Twelve - The Hours EP

8.0
"Great"
N/A
Electroracle
Released off label 2013
Okay, as a short introduction, this is Day Twelve's first release coming out just two days ago. I discovered them on Bandcamp like so many others, and, as usual, I am damn proud that I found them. Hailing from Providence, Rhode Island, Day Twelve combines some very nice melodic beats with a powerful lead female voice that works well aside all the sounds.

Their first song, "Blu Print", really sets in well, with a slow beat to start off with, with a synth line and light piano work, as well as, well, more synths. The vocals kick in about thirty seconds in, and you are hit with beauty. They are deep vocals, but extremely nice at the same time. Sometimes, I find myself feeling as if the vocals go off a bit on the low end at the start of the singing, and as if the breath that they let off at the end of each line is annoying. But, that apart, the singing is still great. And the echoing beats along with the chorus effect that accompanies the voice is relatively adequate.

The next song in the line up is "Move", and is yet another good track. It combines a light drum line every couple of seconds, along with more synths and piano work. Again, the beats are nice, and the vocals come back. This time, there is a bit of screaming within the song, as little as it is, it's still there. And the lead singer also manages to hold a few notes, which isn't anything notable, but with a voice that nice it's lovely to hear.

Now, the basement starts off very slow, nothing but pure ambient work at first, which is then accompanied by more piano work and an extremely light synth, bordering on the line of, again, ambient work. The vocals go back to being deep, but quiet to accompany the tune of the track. And the song really remains light throughout, and is perhaps my favorite track on the album. It keeps its slow pace throughout, and hardly kicks up around the three minute mark.

And then comes along "Monster", which really is the Monster of the album. It's more dance floor like, and proves that Day Twelve is very well adapted to both making electronic pieces and also EBM tracks as they state they can. The vocals completely switch over to a more spoken style that goes along with the tune, and has a very light distortion to it. There is some screeching in the album, which can kick up to a higher pitch and be a nuiance in the ear, but is nothing to really whine about.

Now, as far as I can tell, this is a pretty good EP. It has a few flaws, and may not be the greatest thing that I have ever listened to, but it's still a damn good start for Day Twelve. Their lyrics are very nice, usually having some sort of meaning within them, and as a man who is usually listening to a shit ton of aggrotech with lyrics that usually either involve just pure hatred or mindless bullshit, it's nice to take a break and find something that I can enjoy out of that scene. And I have found that something in the form of Day Twelve. I tip my hat to them. Feb 19 2013

Off label

Official relesae released by the artist themselves without the backing of a label.

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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Started in spring 2009, Brutal Resonance quickly grew from a Swedish based netzine into an established International zine of the highest standard.

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