Colossloth - Outstretch Your Hand For The Impress of Truth
Experimental If we are to speak of Britain's drone and dark ambient scenes, Colossloth should not be a name that goes unmentioned. This solo project has been around for ten years, The Leicester project has been around since 2006 crafting uncanny experimental drone artpieces since his inauguration to the scene. Since then, he has garnered both praise and, I assume while I say this, more than a few curious eyebrows who either find what he is doing is special or completely bonkers. I consider myself one of the few who both realize the ripe traits he showcases while maintaining a morbid fascination with his odd sounds. 

The end of 2015 saw the release of a new beast from Colossloth titled "Outstretch Your Hand For The Impress Of Truth", a nine track album which boasts a comprehensive library of various articles of noise. Colossloth is able to maintain his own identity in the experimental locale thanks to his stunning backdrops and focus on analog-like sounds from another era. 

'The Flavour Of The Weak' would have you think that it might just be another drone track in the vastness of all other things drone and boring. However, once you get to the noise distortion and what sounds like the utter destruction of tape, you will be corrected almost immediately. 'Your Flag Stands For Nothing' shoots between hard blasts of noise and backwards synth loops. The end result is an ugly beauty. 

'Cave In We Are Complete' follows a song structure that was built upon in the last two tracks; a simple drone sound starts us off, but slowly Colossloth drives us down a lane of haunting atmospheres and notes played backward. Some might call this a nightmare but I do not blame them. This is a soundtrack to someone's worst fears; they just don't know it yet. The title track of the album shows an advanced understanding for static noise, and the mid-section of the track showcases the first semblance of rhythm in the album. What sounds like an industrial song trying to come out is cut short and brought back into Colossloth's filthy, unending grasp. 

'The World Keeps Turning  (On Me)' is the first track on the album that is slightly more peaceful than the rest. A screeching noise disrupts any full sense of mind you might think you will get, but it is nonetheless a calmer break in the album. A sick industrial mess is located within 'Of Talons And Teeth'; ADHD is at play as the song goes from one sound to the next, never sticking to a pattern. 

I came across the only song I wasn't all too partial to on the album, and that would be 'Paint Her Face To Simulate The Bloom'. I did appreciate a section that had piano running through it as other, various psychotic sounds overlapped it, but that's about it. This song actually did not sit well with my ears, and as experimental as experimental can be, this just was a headache. Some may like that, though, as masochistic as some can be. I, however, prefer my punishments physically on the body, not aurally. 

Relatively the same thoughts erupted with 'The Nameless Saint'. I absolutely indulged in the first half of the song as blasts of noise controlled the otherwise peaceful piano vibes that rolled through the track. However, the second half without piano guiding it did not speak to me well. The final song on the album, 'Black Deeds From Dead Seeds', was a play with minimal works to tape distortion and very light synths. Not for the light hearted, this final ode to experimentation was rather enjoyable. 

Colossloth is tackling a very niche audience with his latest album, but that is quite alright. He will find his music's place one way or the other. There are a lot of times when I hear that some people just don't quite "get" music like this. But, there is nothing to get. You either like the sound you're hearing or you don't. For me, noise like this - experimental sounds that never cease to twist and bend every corner you stroll down - has a meditative quality to it when played at a low to mid-level, and that's exactly how I prefer it. "Outstretch Your Hand For The Impress Of Truth" is a grueling test of self through industrial menaces and noise experimentation. 
4
Brutal Resonance

Colossloth - Outstretch Your Hand For The Impress of Truth

7.0
"Good"
N/A
Electroracle
Released 2016 by Cold Spring
If we are to speak of Britain's drone and dark ambient scenes, Colossloth should not be a name that goes unmentioned. This solo project has been around for ten years, The Leicester project has been around since 2006 crafting uncanny experimental drone artpieces since his inauguration to the scene. Since then, he has garnered both praise and, I assume while I say this, more than a few curious eyebrows who either find what he is doing is special or completely bonkers. I consider myself one of the few who both realize the ripe traits he showcases while maintaining a morbid fascination with his odd sounds. 

The end of 2015 saw the release of a new beast from Colossloth titled "Outstretch Your Hand For The Impress Of Truth", a nine track album which boasts a comprehensive library of various articles of noise. Colossloth is able to maintain his own identity in the experimental locale thanks to his stunning backdrops and focus on analog-like sounds from another era. 

'The Flavour Of The Weak' would have you think that it might just be another drone track in the vastness of all other things drone and boring. However, once you get to the noise distortion and what sounds like the utter destruction of tape, you will be corrected almost immediately. 'Your Flag Stands For Nothing' shoots between hard blasts of noise and backwards synth loops. The end result is an ugly beauty. 

'Cave In We Are Complete' follows a song structure that was built upon in the last two tracks; a simple drone sound starts us off, but slowly Colossloth drives us down a lane of haunting atmospheres and notes played backward. Some might call this a nightmare but I do not blame them. This is a soundtrack to someone's worst fears; they just don't know it yet. The title track of the album shows an advanced understanding for static noise, and the mid-section of the track showcases the first semblance of rhythm in the album. What sounds like an industrial song trying to come out is cut short and brought back into Colossloth's filthy, unending grasp. 

'The World Keeps Turning  (On Me)' is the first track on the album that is slightly more peaceful than the rest. A screeching noise disrupts any full sense of mind you might think you will get, but it is nonetheless a calmer break in the album. A sick industrial mess is located within 'Of Talons And Teeth'; ADHD is at play as the song goes from one sound to the next, never sticking to a pattern. 

I came across the only song I wasn't all too partial to on the album, and that would be 'Paint Her Face To Simulate The Bloom'. I did appreciate a section that had piano running through it as other, various psychotic sounds overlapped it, but that's about it. This song actually did not sit well with my ears, and as experimental as experimental can be, this just was a headache. Some may like that, though, as masochistic as some can be. I, however, prefer my punishments physically on the body, not aurally. 

Relatively the same thoughts erupted with 'The Nameless Saint'. I absolutely indulged in the first half of the song as blasts of noise controlled the otherwise peaceful piano vibes that rolled through the track. However, the second half without piano guiding it did not speak to me well. The final song on the album, 'Black Deeds From Dead Seeds', was a play with minimal works to tape distortion and very light synths. Not for the light hearted, this final ode to experimentation was rather enjoyable. 

Colossloth is tackling a very niche audience with his latest album, but that is quite alright. He will find his music's place one way or the other. There are a lot of times when I hear that some people just don't quite "get" music like this. But, there is nothing to get. You either like the sound you're hearing or you don't. For me, noise like this - experimental sounds that never cease to twist and bend every corner you stroll down - has a meditative quality to it when played at a low to mid-level, and that's exactly how I prefer it. "Outstretch Your Hand For The Impress Of Truth" is a grueling test of self through industrial menaces and noise experimentation. 
Jan 19 2016

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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