Endgame Protocol - American Dreams
Industrial Editor's Note: This review was originally posted when the artist was under the name of "antiPLUR". We were requested to change the name of the artist and removed the Bandcamp link as it is broken. We will re-add shop links later and more information when it is available. 

Alright, well, there really isn't much information available online in regards to antiPLUR, other than it is headed by Aaron Dictor based in Sarasota, FL, and that it's an industrial project. This band was featured in a...mixtape (I hate that fucking word so much, but you can view that here) back in 2013, where his song 'Hipster Trash' was featured. Perhaps that was a sign that one day I would be writing a full review on his album, "American Dreams". 

And what we have here is a pretty stellar dude who knows his industrial well enough to produce a good album. The title track hits in first, and in classic industrial form, it's a bitingly political song that homes in on religious issues found within the United States, but I suppose the message could be universal throughout each and every country. EBM is the name of the game in this song, focusing on a harsh EBM style scream while, 'It's a great day to be an American' is sung, but goes to a sort of echoed shout during the verse. Overall, it was a very powerful start to the album, and would be a hard song to conquer as the album went on. 

'Dust' through in guitar work to an overall faster paced electronic beat. This is also where I realized that antiPLUR's vocals aren't always on spot; the sort of chorus effect placed on them at certain segments of the song was able to mask his sort of flat tone; nonetheless, I had no problems with the music and it was able to keep the song flowing. 

'Legacy' had some excellent synth work going on, with what sounds like high pitched electronic guitar notes ringing in the background the whole time. It does stay more or less within the EBM genre, but, once more, I think his chords needed work; they were nasally. 

'The Day I Didn't Speak My Mind' threw us back to the more shouty sort of sounding singing, which was lovely because it took the vocals back to a more pleasant sound. Expect another EBM track with not so many surprises as it is just technical mastery. 

'ESV (Electronic State Voyeurism' was a shorter song, using samples and organ sounds to make it sound like it belonged on a soundtrack to an old school, demon-based horror film. The song got louder and louder as it went on, and that was part of the magic. 

'Panicide' takes the ship and rockets it into completely new territory. You can tell it's still antiPLUR as it does contain some of his niche techniques, but the sharp guitar work and screeching chords brings this song right into industrial metal bounds. It was awesome, and a surprise. After this, an instrumental that sort of follows suit, but lighter (straying more into industrial rock territory without the inclusion of the harsh sounds and vocal work) displayed itself. It wasn't my favorite song on the album, nor did it contain the best sound to it, but I was able to get through it. 

Another electronic, sort of rhythmic noise based instrumental came next with 'NTMR'. While I thought the build up was a bit slow and boring, when the clash of electronics hit my blood boiled and I was able to dig the track. 

'Spiders' came along, and was another shocking song. Acoustic instrumentation met antiPLUR's softer industrial side. Well, that's at least for the first two and a half minutes. After that, the drum work cranked up a bit and a riveting electronic line came along, and Dictor started screaming once more. It sounded lovely. In all honesty, this song reminded me of something that Citizen 16 would put out, except less on the synthpop side. I could see these two doing a collaboration sometime in the future. 

Lastly, 'I, Singularity' hit in with a sort of cyberpunk sound mixed with Holy chords as the intro; this is probably something that should be played as bombs drop before your very eyes. Or something like that. The rest of the song just mixes and mingles a solid beat and Dictor's voice wasn't half bad at all this time around. Good on him. 

So, though the vocals were pretty rough in certain parts, Dictor has managed to push out a very, very solid album underneath antiPLUR. Someone sign this guy; he's pretty fucking good. 
4
Brutal Resonance

Endgame Protocol - American Dreams

7.5
"Good"
Released off label 2015
Editor's Note: This review was originally posted when the artist was under the name of "antiPLUR". We were requested to change the name of the artist and removed the Bandcamp link as it is broken. We will re-add shop links later and more information when it is available. 

Alright, well, there really isn't much information available online in regards to antiPLUR, other than it is headed by Aaron Dictor based in Sarasota, FL, and that it's an industrial project. This band was featured in a...mixtape (I hate that fucking word so much, but you can view that here) back in 2013, where his song 'Hipster Trash' was featured. Perhaps that was a sign that one day I would be writing a full review on his album, "American Dreams". 

And what we have here is a pretty stellar dude who knows his industrial well enough to produce a good album. The title track hits in first, and in classic industrial form, it's a bitingly political song that homes in on religious issues found within the United States, but I suppose the message could be universal throughout each and every country. EBM is the name of the game in this song, focusing on a harsh EBM style scream while, 'It's a great day to be an American' is sung, but goes to a sort of echoed shout during the verse. Overall, it was a very powerful start to the album, and would be a hard song to conquer as the album went on. 

'Dust' through in guitar work to an overall faster paced electronic beat. This is also where I realized that antiPLUR's vocals aren't always on spot; the sort of chorus effect placed on them at certain segments of the song was able to mask his sort of flat tone; nonetheless, I had no problems with the music and it was able to keep the song flowing. 

'Legacy' had some excellent synth work going on, with what sounds like high pitched electronic guitar notes ringing in the background the whole time. It does stay more or less within the EBM genre, but, once more, I think his chords needed work; they were nasally. 

'The Day I Didn't Speak My Mind' threw us back to the more shouty sort of sounding singing, which was lovely because it took the vocals back to a more pleasant sound. Expect another EBM track with not so many surprises as it is just technical mastery. 

'ESV (Electronic State Voyeurism' was a shorter song, using samples and organ sounds to make it sound like it belonged on a soundtrack to an old school, demon-based horror film. The song got louder and louder as it went on, and that was part of the magic. 

'Panicide' takes the ship and rockets it into completely new territory. You can tell it's still antiPLUR as it does contain some of his niche techniques, but the sharp guitar work and screeching chords brings this song right into industrial metal bounds. It was awesome, and a surprise. After this, an instrumental that sort of follows suit, but lighter (straying more into industrial rock territory without the inclusion of the harsh sounds and vocal work) displayed itself. It wasn't my favorite song on the album, nor did it contain the best sound to it, but I was able to get through it. 

Another electronic, sort of rhythmic noise based instrumental came next with 'NTMR'. While I thought the build up was a bit slow and boring, when the clash of electronics hit my blood boiled and I was able to dig the track. 

'Spiders' came along, and was another shocking song. Acoustic instrumentation met antiPLUR's softer industrial side. Well, that's at least for the first two and a half minutes. After that, the drum work cranked up a bit and a riveting electronic line came along, and Dictor started screaming once more. It sounded lovely. In all honesty, this song reminded me of something that Citizen 16 would put out, except less on the synthpop side. I could see these two doing a collaboration sometime in the future. 

Lastly, 'I, Singularity' hit in with a sort of cyberpunk sound mixed with Holy chords as the intro; this is probably something that should be played as bombs drop before your very eyes. Or something like that. The rest of the song just mixes and mingles a solid beat and Dictor's voice wasn't half bad at all this time around. Good on him. 

So, though the vocals were pretty rough in certain parts, Dictor has managed to push out a very, very solid album underneath antiPLUR. Someone sign this guy; he's pretty fucking good. 
May 08 2015

Off label

Official release released by the artist themselves without the backing of a label.

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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