You know, I kinda get bored of asking this question to every artist I interview, but, for those who don't know of you and your project, can we get a little history lesson?

MIchael - "Tapewyrm began in late 2010 as a studio based hobby project. Born primarily out of my own frustrations with aborted bands and the desire to do something, anything creative."

I understand (at least from what your discogs page tells me) that Tapewyrm didn't release any music until around 2012. Did you have anything out before that?

Michael - "That's mostly correct, prior to Misanthropic Noise there were two demo EPs which were revised and revisited to form the bulk of the album. Outside of that many of my early tracks were released on Soundcloud."

As well as previous music goes, did you ever have any previous projects before Tapewyrm? Or participate in anything else?

Michael - "Nothing that ever really went anywhere, there were a couple of bands in my early 20's. I left music for a few years after those and came back to it in the late 2000s, until I decided to do it all myself nothing happened."

Now, when it comes to Rhythmic Noise, you have a very distinct sound that will allow anyone to recognize your sounds, in my opinion. When did you first start developing this unique flow?

Michael - "That's hard to pin down if I'm honest, I think in part it's because of my background outside electronic music."

As of now, you only have one full length album released, as well as the recent EP. When can we next expect a new album?

Michael - "Well, depending on how things pan out, I'm hoping to release 3 EPs over the course of this year. Any one of those could easily turn into a full length album during the writing process. As it stands, though, there probably won't be a new full length until the end of the year or next year."

One product that I honestly hope comes to fruition would be a cassette tape release of some of your work, whether it be of something old or new. Do you ever have plans on releasing a tape? I think it would go along with the project's name.

Michael - "That's already in the works, I'm not entirely sure what the plan is just yet but in all likelihood there will be a re-release of this first chapter at some point so, watch this space."

In House of Cards, there was some almost subliminal singing from a woman named Tiffanie Wells on the title track. Who is she and will you be featuring her chords in any future work?

Michael - "Tiff is a great friend of mine from ambient/noise group Beinaheleidenschaftsgegenstand. I first met Tiff at Resistanz 2013, through our mutual support of Beat:Cancer & love of Throbbing Gristle. When it came down to needing a creepy female vocal for House of Cards I knew exactly who to call. As for future appearances, I'm not ruling anything out, it depends entirely on what I feel each track needs."

I'm not sure if you can open up any information on this, but I know that House of Cards marked the end of the first chapter for Tapewyrm. Can you let us know what direction you're going in next?

Michael - "It's early days yet, I started out as a guitarist so I'm folding that back into the mix in some way. There are a bunch of things I'm experimenting with right now. I'd expect the next release to be more organic on the whole, there may be a few surprises for people already familiar with my stuff too."

I know that you have an upcoming show in May, supporting the wonderful iVardensphere. Have you performed live before and, if so, how were the responses?

Michael - "This will be my first time out with Tapewyrm. I've played a few shows with previous bands and played a few DJ slots before now, but nothing on this kind of scale. I'm looking forward to it but I've got to say I'm a little nervous."

Aside from playing on stage, what do you plan on doing to spice things up for the crowd? I could see you being the type to chuck chainsaws into the audience. It'd fit well with the chaos of the music.

Michael - "Haha, I can't rule out chainsaws but for the most part I'll be letting the music do the talking, no BS, no gimmicks just 100% pure noise."

After the UK show, do you have any future shows planned?

Michael - "I'm in the process of sorting some more shows out, hopefully one or two with Beinaheleidenschaftsgegenstand depending on how things go."

And I think that's all I can really ask at the moment. I have everything covered, so, if anything, do you have any final words for anyone in particular?

Michael - "I'm also appearing on Beat:Cancer Volume 2 this year alongside some incredible artists from throughout the scene. Beat:Cancer is a charity compilation in aid of Cancer Research UK, last year it raised over £2000 for the cause & this year we're hoping to better that. It's released on April 19th at Resistanz & is available for pre-order now. Other than that I just want to thank all those who have supported me this far, friends, fans, bands & the crew at Juggernaut."
Tapewyrm interview
February 3, 2014
Brutal Resonance

Tapewyrm

Feb 2014
You know, I kinda get bored of asking this question to every artist I interview, but, for those who don't know of you and your project, can we get a little history lesson?

MIchael - "Tapewyrm began in late 2010 as a studio based hobby project. Born primarily out of my own frustrations with aborted bands and the desire to do something, anything creative."

I understand (at least from what your discogs page tells me) that Tapewyrm didn't release any music until around 2012. Did you have anything out before that?

Michael - "That's mostly correct, prior to Misanthropic Noise there were two demo EPs which were revised and revisited to form the bulk of the album. Outside of that many of my early tracks were released on Soundcloud."

As well as previous music goes, did you ever have any previous projects before Tapewyrm? Or participate in anything else?

Michael - "Nothing that ever really went anywhere, there were a couple of bands in my early 20's. I left music for a few years after those and came back to it in the late 2000s, until I decided to do it all myself nothing happened."

Now, when it comes to Rhythmic Noise, you have a very distinct sound that will allow anyone to recognize your sounds, in my opinion. When did you first start developing this unique flow?

Michael - "That's hard to pin down if I'm honest, I think in part it's because of my background outside electronic music."

As of now, you only have one full length album released, as well as the recent EP. When can we next expect a new album?

Michael - "Well, depending on how things pan out, I'm hoping to release 3 EPs over the course of this year. Any one of those could easily turn into a full length album during the writing process. As it stands, though, there probably won't be a new full length until the end of the year or next year."

One product that I honestly hope comes to fruition would be a cassette tape release of some of your work, whether it be of something old or new. Do you ever have plans on releasing a tape? I think it would go along with the project's name.

Michael - "That's already in the works, I'm not entirely sure what the plan is just yet but in all likelihood there will be a re-release of this first chapter at some point so, watch this space."

In House of Cards, there was some almost subliminal singing from a woman named Tiffanie Wells on the title track. Who is she and will you be featuring her chords in any future work?

Michael - "Tiff is a great friend of mine from ambient/noise group Beinaheleidenschaftsgegenstand. I first met Tiff at Resistanz 2013, through our mutual support of Beat:Cancer & love of Throbbing Gristle. When it came down to needing a creepy female vocal for House of Cards I knew exactly who to call. As for future appearances, I'm not ruling anything out, it depends entirely on what I feel each track needs."

I'm not sure if you can open up any information on this, but I know that House of Cards marked the end of the first chapter for Tapewyrm. Can you let us know what direction you're going in next?

Michael - "It's early days yet, I started out as a guitarist so I'm folding that back into the mix in some way. There are a bunch of things I'm experimenting with right now. I'd expect the next release to be more organic on the whole, there may be a few surprises for people already familiar with my stuff too."

I know that you have an upcoming show in May, supporting the wonderful iVardensphere. Have you performed live before and, if so, how were the responses?

Michael - "This will be my first time out with Tapewyrm. I've played a few shows with previous bands and played a few DJ slots before now, but nothing on this kind of scale. I'm looking forward to it but I've got to say I'm a little nervous."

Aside from playing on stage, what do you plan on doing to spice things up for the crowd? I could see you being the type to chuck chainsaws into the audience. It'd fit well with the chaos of the music.

Michael - "Haha, I can't rule out chainsaws but for the most part I'll be letting the music do the talking, no BS, no gimmicks just 100% pure noise."

After the UK show, do you have any future shows planned?

Michael - "I'm in the process of sorting some more shows out, hopefully one or two with Beinaheleidenschaftsgegenstand depending on how things go."

And I think that's all I can really ask at the moment. I have everything covered, so, if anything, do you have any final words for anyone in particular?

Michael - "I'm also appearing on Beat:Cancer Volume 2 this year alongside some incredible artists from throughout the scene. Beat:Cancer is a charity compilation in aid of Cancer Research UK, last year it raised over £2000 for the cause & this year we're hoping to better that. It's released on April 19th at Resistanz & is available for pre-order now. Other than that I just want to thank all those who have supported me this far, friends, fans, bands & the crew at Juggernaut."
Feb 03 2014
Mankind often is too blind to see reality.
Suicide Commando, Jan 01 2004

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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