Resin is the solo project of Prague-born cinematic, ambient, and industrial producer Niko Antonucci. Now living in the sprawling city of Los Angeles, Resin is setting up to release her next EP "Fidget" on August 25th. With the album just a few weeks away, we got a chance to speak with Antonucci about her history and "Fidget" in detail. Don't forget to hit the play button directly below: 



Hi there and welcome to Brutal Resonance! It's lovely to have Resin on the site after listening to 'Fidget' a couple of times. Let's start off with some basic introductory stuff. Who is in Resin, how would you describe your music, and what's your favorite movie?

Resin:  Hey, thank you for having me. My name is Niko and I have a music project called Resin where I produce dark, ambient electronica. I also sing on most of my tracks. And Grinch is my favorite movie.

I read that you were born in Prague, started playing the piano at six, and stole your fathers guitar from time to time as a teen. It seems you were born with a passion for music from the get-go. That being said, when did you get into producing electronic music?

Resin:  Well, I have played with acoustic guitar for a few years but after getting more into industrial and drum’n’bass, I saw the potential of producing myself. With all the synths and libraries I unlocked the potential of the big sound I have always dreamed of, all that without anybody constantly telling me what the sound should be. And I’m still seeking, but having the possibility to work with endless instruments and sounds is very inspiring. 

Though raised in Prague, you eventually moved to Los Angeles. Did that move help or hurt your musical career in any way?

Resin:  The transition was tough because back in Prague, I was a part of the music inner circle, the music community - I knew people, I knew how to get around, where to ask for favors. Here I didn’t know anybody except for my husband. I was stuck home. I believe that I moved here at the right time though. I made the commitment to produce myself and being in a strange world gave me the time, the isolation and the inspiration I needed, as well as the space to make mistakes and not feel judged by an audience. I had time to improve myself. 

You've got a couple of influences such as NIN, Portishead, and Nirvana. However, would you say that any one band has had more of an impact on your style than any other? If so, why?

Resin:  I don’t know if on my style but Nirvana was the totem I always looked up to. Other artists helped me understand my sound little better, helped me figure out how to express myself better technically. Nirvana defined me.


I understand that you played in a multitude of different bands in your life, but when did you give birth to Resin? Is there a first single or demo lying anywhere around the internet?

Resin:  I pretty much started producing in 2014 when I moved to LA. I have been creating under Libido which was the name I was using back in Czech. But I wanted to start over, without comparing myself to my older songs. I was ready to progress. I released a few songs last year and you can find them on iTunes and Soundcloud.

When you did first create music under the Resin name, did you feel odd without a band around yourself, or did you feel more at home knowing that you could express yourself without anyone else getting in the way?

Resin:  I have been playing with few bands but it has always been mostly me. Producing made me feel free because I had the option of choosing more than one instrument, option of capturing my ideas and layer them with other ideas, recording strings at 2AM – that kind of stuff. I never considered producing myself until I had to. I ran out of options to make music that would please me since my guitar skills and equipment were so limited. I love guitar more than anything but I wanted more. I miss guitar so much though.

And how has it been writing under Resin? Do you ever find yourself in a difficult spot where writer's block takes charge, or do you find yourself smoothly making music without trial and error?

Resin:  I know when I feel inspired and things happen fast then. But I struggle with sticking to one sound, one genre. I would love to have a cohesive sound but I am torn between so many different directions. One day I’d write cinematic ballad with heartbreaking lyrics and vocals and next day I feel like dark psytrance and I feel embarrassed that I enjoyed writing my cinematic ballad from yesterday. I am scared to be classified because I really want to belong into the right class, I really want to be classified correctly - I don’t know how to classify myself.

Your upcoming album Fidget is releasing on August 25th and I'd like to take some time to go over that with you. What is Fidget about? Does it have an overall concept or theme, or does each song speak for itself?

Resin:  I’d say that it does have a common theme but as much as I would love to say that it is conceptual, it is not. There has been a theme that I tend to focus on, especially lyric-wise. But it also contains one of the most narcissistic songs I’ve ever written.


How do you go about writing lyrics for a song? Do you look in yourself for the words, do you look out into the world? Do you try to write about personal issues as a sort of stress relief? In other words, what inspires you to write?

Resin:  I tend to write about my relationship to one particular theme that is repeating. But my perspective on that relationship is changing and that’s what I usually write about. Unless I feel really shitty, then I write about myself. 

When you were finally done putting Fidget together in one cohesive package, did you feel good about it? Do you think this is your piece de resistance?

I guess I did feel good. I felt okay with it for the first time in my life. I used to hate my work, I used to be embarrassed by it. This time I felt like I did good. But by the time I finished the album I was already in a different place, ready to progress, ready to write new stuff. But it helped me to define my sound. It made it clearer in my head, where I’m going, what the next direction could be. 

I know the album is not out as of yet, but have their been any comments about the album so far? Good or bad? And how do you take reception for your music? Do you take it seriously or do you just kind of brush it off your shoulder?

Resin:  Ooh it’s tough. After all these years I got very insecure about my music. I barely have enough confidence to put it out there, so when I get even a constructive criticism, I take it hard. It breaks my heart. I have to learn how to deal with that. I am so afraid that I could embarrass myself. 

And what's the future hold for Resin? Any EPs, remixes, tours, shows, or gigs lined up? If so, can we have the details on them?

Resin:  I am playing in New York on Aug 9 and then I have a few shows lined up in LA. The official release party is on Sept 9 at Bar Sinister. I am planning on releasing a full length album in spring of 2018. So I’m planning on shutting myself home in the fall to collect enough material.

Lastly, I'd like to thank you for your time! I hope “Fidget” catches on with a large audience and that it gets appreciated – as it properly should. Cheers!
Resin interview
August 8, 2017
Brutal Resonance

Resin

Aug 2017
Resin is the solo project of Prague-born cinematic, ambient, and industrial producer Niko Antonucci. Now living in the sprawling city of Los Angeles, Resin is setting up to release her next EP "Fidget" on August 25th. With the album just a few weeks away, we got a chance to speak with Antonucci about her history and "Fidget" in detail. Don't forget to hit the play button directly below: 



Hi there and welcome to Brutal Resonance! It's lovely to have Resin on the site after listening to 'Fidget' a couple of times. Let's start off with some basic introductory stuff. Who is in Resin, how would you describe your music, and what's your favorite movie?

Resin:  Hey, thank you for having me. My name is Niko and I have a music project called Resin where I produce dark, ambient electronica. I also sing on most of my tracks. And Grinch is my favorite movie.

I read that you were born in Prague, started playing the piano at six, and stole your fathers guitar from time to time as a teen. It seems you were born with a passion for music from the get-go. That being said, when did you get into producing electronic music?

Resin:  Well, I have played with acoustic guitar for a few years but after getting more into industrial and drum’n’bass, I saw the potential of producing myself. With all the synths and libraries I unlocked the potential of the big sound I have always dreamed of, all that without anybody constantly telling me what the sound should be. And I’m still seeking, but having the possibility to work with endless instruments and sounds is very inspiring. 

Though raised in Prague, you eventually moved to Los Angeles. Did that move help or hurt your musical career in any way?

Resin:  The transition was tough because back in Prague, I was a part of the music inner circle, the music community - I knew people, I knew how to get around, where to ask for favors. Here I didn’t know anybody except for my husband. I was stuck home. I believe that I moved here at the right time though. I made the commitment to produce myself and being in a strange world gave me the time, the isolation and the inspiration I needed, as well as the space to make mistakes and not feel judged by an audience. I had time to improve myself. 

You've got a couple of influences such as NIN, Portishead, and Nirvana. However, would you say that any one band has had more of an impact on your style than any other? If so, why?

Resin:  I don’t know if on my style but Nirvana was the totem I always looked up to. Other artists helped me understand my sound little better, helped me figure out how to express myself better technically. Nirvana defined me.


I understand that you played in a multitude of different bands in your life, but when did you give birth to Resin? Is there a first single or demo lying anywhere around the internet?

Resin:  I pretty much started producing in 2014 when I moved to LA. I have been creating under Libido which was the name I was using back in Czech. But I wanted to start over, without comparing myself to my older songs. I was ready to progress. I released a few songs last year and you can find them on iTunes and Soundcloud.

When you did first create music under the Resin name, did you feel odd without a band around yourself, or did you feel more at home knowing that you could express yourself without anyone else getting in the way?

Resin:  I have been playing with few bands but it has always been mostly me. Producing made me feel free because I had the option of choosing more than one instrument, option of capturing my ideas and layer them with other ideas, recording strings at 2AM – that kind of stuff. I never considered producing myself until I had to. I ran out of options to make music that would please me since my guitar skills and equipment were so limited. I love guitar more than anything but I wanted more. I miss guitar so much though.

And how has it been writing under Resin? Do you ever find yourself in a difficult spot where writer's block takes charge, or do you find yourself smoothly making music without trial and error?

Resin:  I know when I feel inspired and things happen fast then. But I struggle with sticking to one sound, one genre. I would love to have a cohesive sound but I am torn between so many different directions. One day I’d write cinematic ballad with heartbreaking lyrics and vocals and next day I feel like dark psytrance and I feel embarrassed that I enjoyed writing my cinematic ballad from yesterday. I am scared to be classified because I really want to belong into the right class, I really want to be classified correctly - I don’t know how to classify myself.

Your upcoming album Fidget is releasing on August 25th and I'd like to take some time to go over that with you. What is Fidget about? Does it have an overall concept or theme, or does each song speak for itself?

Resin:  I’d say that it does have a common theme but as much as I would love to say that it is conceptual, it is not. There has been a theme that I tend to focus on, especially lyric-wise. But it also contains one of the most narcissistic songs I’ve ever written.


How do you go about writing lyrics for a song? Do you look in yourself for the words, do you look out into the world? Do you try to write about personal issues as a sort of stress relief? In other words, what inspires you to write?

Resin:  I tend to write about my relationship to one particular theme that is repeating. But my perspective on that relationship is changing and that’s what I usually write about. Unless I feel really shitty, then I write about myself. 

When you were finally done putting Fidget together in one cohesive package, did you feel good about it? Do you think this is your piece de resistance?

I guess I did feel good. I felt okay with it for the first time in my life. I used to hate my work, I used to be embarrassed by it. This time I felt like I did good. But by the time I finished the album I was already in a different place, ready to progress, ready to write new stuff. But it helped me to define my sound. It made it clearer in my head, where I’m going, what the next direction could be. 

I know the album is not out as of yet, but have their been any comments about the album so far? Good or bad? And how do you take reception for your music? Do you take it seriously or do you just kind of brush it off your shoulder?

Resin:  Ooh it’s tough. After all these years I got very insecure about my music. I barely have enough confidence to put it out there, so when I get even a constructive criticism, I take it hard. It breaks my heart. I have to learn how to deal with that. I am so afraid that I could embarrass myself. 

And what's the future hold for Resin? Any EPs, remixes, tours, shows, or gigs lined up? If so, can we have the details on them?

Resin:  I am playing in New York on Aug 9 and then I have a few shows lined up in LA. The official release party is on Sept 9 at Bar Sinister. I am planning on releasing a full length album in spring of 2018. So I’m planning on shutting myself home in the fall to collect enough material.

Lastly, I'd like to thank you for your time! I hope “Fidget” catches on with a large audience and that it gets appreciated – as it properly should. Cheers!
Aug 08 2017

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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