In this round, Christopher Gurney, AKA IIOIOIOII gives us his five favorite horror films, showing that just because he's known for his softer synthpop and dreamy vocals, he appreciates gore and tense suspense just like the rest of us. 

"Alien" by Ridley Scott

"This movie set the stage for suspense and horror. At the same time, it used realistic sci-fi as a setting so successfully it inspired countless films. The amazing set designs and artistic direction still holds to this day. Giger's work was so faithfully reproduced that it was clearly a work of love and inspiration. I know many people have seen this film in theaters, VHS, or DVD but I highly recommend you watch it in HD. There are so many colors in the sets that were lost in poor resolutions and limitations in the projection technology of the time. It really didn't do the movie justice. The choices to limit the visibility of the xenomorph until the very end of the movie was genius. Very little can prepare you for the final feeling of helplessness in the final scene. This movie is timeless and will continue to terrify generations to come."

"The Haunting" by Robert Wise

"Subtlety is the key phrase for this classic horror movie. Through the use of inner monologues and very clever sound design this movie was the first to successfully make one jump at their own shadow. Through the entire film you expect the worst hells to come and confront the main character Eleanor Lance. You wait with bated breath completely tense until you begin to question the heroin's own sanity. This isn't a horror film that rests on the laurels of its effects and makeup but the strength of its actors."


"The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari" by Robert Wiene

"The great Robert Wiene directed a movie so influential it literally made successful careers for future directors decades later. One of the first movies to reveal a psychological twist in the plot. A set design that would be appropriated and used countless times. There's very little in this world from 1921 that can hold its own to their contemporary peers but this film can still be enjoyed immensely by everyone."



"One Hour Photo" by Mark Romanek

"I consider this to be one of Robin Williams' best works. The feelings of depression, loneliness, and unease overwhelm your senses and make you wary of and sympathetic to Williams' character Sy. You see the fragility of the family unit and the vulnerability we all share from even the most inconspicuous sources. The cinematography is very subtle and minimalist. The dialogue is uncomfortable and realistic. The emotions this film brings out are real but almost undefined."


"Audition" by Takashi Miike

"A fever dream from a visionary Japanese director. Takashi Miike creates a surrealist horror movie focusing on honesty and intentions. You watch the main character manipulate his way into a relationship with a complete stranger. Feeling disjointed and appalled you see the relationship spiral into a horror filled nightmare you never expected. Great sound design and scenes create some of the most horrifying scenes you will ever see. Needless to say it freaked me out... kiri kiri kiri."
IIOIOIOII's Top Five Horror Films
October 4, 2015
Brutal Resonance

IIOIOIOII's Top Five Horror Films

In this round, Christopher Gurney, AKA IIOIOIOII gives us his five favorite horror films, showing that just because he's known for his softer synthpop and dreamy vocals, he appreciates gore and tense suspense just like the rest of us. 

"Alien" by Ridley Scott

"This movie set the stage for suspense and horror. At the same time, it used realistic sci-fi as a setting so successfully it inspired countless films. The amazing set designs and artistic direction still holds to this day. Giger's work was so faithfully reproduced that it was clearly a work of love and inspiration. I know many people have seen this film in theaters, VHS, or DVD but I highly recommend you watch it in HD. There are so many colors in the sets that were lost in poor resolutions and limitations in the projection technology of the time. It really didn't do the movie justice. The choices to limit the visibility of the xenomorph until the very end of the movie was genius. Very little can prepare you for the final feeling of helplessness in the final scene. This movie is timeless and will continue to terrify generations to come."

"The Haunting" by Robert Wise

"Subtlety is the key phrase for this classic horror movie. Through the use of inner monologues and very clever sound design this movie was the first to successfully make one jump at their own shadow. Through the entire film you expect the worst hells to come and confront the main character Eleanor Lance. You wait with bated breath completely tense until you begin to question the heroin's own sanity. This isn't a horror film that rests on the laurels of its effects and makeup but the strength of its actors."


"The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari" by Robert Wiene

"The great Robert Wiene directed a movie so influential it literally made successful careers for future directors decades later. One of the first movies to reveal a psychological twist in the plot. A set design that would be appropriated and used countless times. There's very little in this world from 1921 that can hold its own to their contemporary peers but this film can still be enjoyed immensely by everyone."



"One Hour Photo" by Mark Romanek

"I consider this to be one of Robin Williams' best works. The feelings of depression, loneliness, and unease overwhelm your senses and make you wary of and sympathetic to Williams' character Sy. You see the fragility of the family unit and the vulnerability we all share from even the most inconspicuous sources. The cinematography is very subtle and minimalist. The dialogue is uncomfortable and realistic. The emotions this film brings out are real but almost undefined."


"Audition" by Takashi Miike

"A fever dream from a visionary Japanese director. Takashi Miike creates a surrealist horror movie focusing on honesty and intentions. You watch the main character manipulate his way into a relationship with a complete stranger. Feeling disjointed and appalled you see the relationship spiral into a horror filled nightmare you never expected. Great sound design and scenes create some of the most horrifying scenes you will ever see. Needless to say it freaked me out... kiri kiri kiri."
Oct 04 2015

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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Started in spring 2009, Brutal Resonance quickly grew from a Swedish based netzine into an established International zine of the highest standard.

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